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John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 2 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 21, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
-fifth Illinois, who found symptoms of typhoid fever. The river was low; we made slow progress till above Helena; and, as we approached Memphis, Dr. Roler told me that Willie's life was in danger, and he was extremely anxious to reach Memphis for certain medicines and for consultation. We arrived at Memphis on the 2d of October, carried Willie up to the Gayoso Hotel, and got the most experienced physician there, who acted with Dr. Roler, but he sank rapidly, and died the evening of the 3d of October. The blow was a terrible one to us all, so sudden and so unexpected, that I could not help reproaching myself for having consented to his visit in that sickly region in the summer-time. Of all my children, he seemed the most precious. Born in San Francisco, I had watched with intense interest his development, and he seemed more than any of the children to take an interest in my special profession. Mrs. Sherman, Minnie, Lizzie, and Tom, were with him at the time, and we all, helpless
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
heast of Gadsden, where the rebel army could be supplied from the direction of Montgomery and Mobile, and from which point Hood could easily threaten Middle Tennessee. My first impression was, that Hood would make for that point; but by the 3d of October the indications were that he would strike our railroad nearer us, viz., about Kingston or Marietta. Orders were at once made for the Twentieth Corps (Slocum's) to hold Atlanta and the bridges of the Chattahoochee, and the other corps were Tennessee about eight thousand cavalry, and Hood's army was estimated at from thirty-five to forty thousand men, infantry and artillery, including Wheeler's cavalry, then about three thousand strong. We crossed the Chattahoochee River during the 3d and 4th of October, rendezvoused at the old battle-field of Smyrna Camp, and the next day reached Marietta and Kenesaw. The telegraph-wires had been cut above Marietta, and learning that heavy masses of infantry, artillery, and cavalry, had been s
med a position, to take a position which would give us the use of our batteries and the open ground in the vicinity of Corinth, the exact position to be determined by events and the movements of the enemy. operations of the battle of the Third of October. Early in the morning the advance under Col. Oliver found strong indications that the pressure under which he had retired on the second came from the advancing foe, and accordingly took a strong position on the hill near the angle of the sent out the Chewalla road to meet the rebels, with instructions to resist strongly enough to draw them under the defences of Corinth. The rebels skirmished with us on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and appeared in great force on Friday, (October third.) Our troops were then rather rudely pushed back. We were, in fact, getting the worst of it, and severely. Stanley's division meantime was sent out to support the advance, and our forces in Corinth were prepared for the encounter. By night
ng road. The general plan which was explained to the division commanders verbally on the morning, was to hold the enemy at arm's length by approaching him strongly in our assumed positions, and when his force became fully developed and he had assumed a position, to take a position which would give us the use of our batteries and the open ground in the vicinity of Corinth, the exact position to be determined by events and the movements of the enemy. operations of the battle of the Third of October. Early in the morning the advance under Col. Oliver found strong indications that the pressure under which he had retired on the second came from the advancing foe, and accordingly took a strong position on the hill near the angle of the rebel breastworks, with his three regiments and a section of artillery. By nine o'clock the enemy began to press them sharply and outflank them. Brigadier-General Arthur, whom I had requested to go to the front, reported widespread but slack skir
The Keeper of the Richmond Bastile.--Capt. T. D. Jeffress, C. S. A., has been assigned to the command of the confederate States military prison, known as the Libby, corner of Twentieth and Cary streets. Capt. Jeffress was attached to the Fifty-sixth Virginia regiment, and was with Gen. John B. Floyd in Western Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee, and also served in the battles of Gaines's Mills and Frazier's Dam, around Richmond, where for gallant and meritorious service he received honorable mention in the brigade report.--Richmond Examiner, October 3.
Salt in Virginia.--The first instalment of salt for the citizens of Henrico County has arrived, and will be distributed to-day, (Oct. 3,) by Mr. M. C. Eggleston, at the county court-house. Persons before applying must procure a certificate from a justice of the peace in his district. Each person in charge of a family is entitled to one and a half pounds for each member of the family, at five cents per pound. Carry the right change in order to prevent confusion and delay. Ten days is only allowed to deliver the above instalment. Elijah baker.
Mobile, October 3.--Brute Butler has issued an order (No. 76) requiring all persons in New-Orleans, male or female, eighteen years of age or upwards, who sympathize with the Southern Confederacy, to report themselves by first October, with descriptive lists of their property, real and personal. If they renew their allegiance to the United States Government, they are to be recommended for pardon; if not, they will be fined and imprisoned, and their property confiscated. The policemen of the city are charged with the duty of seeing that every householder enrols his property in the respective districts.--Richmond Inquirer, October 6.
of Atlanta, until the twenty-ninth of September, on which day, at an early hour, General Morgan's division (Second) left by railroad for Chattanooga and Huntsville, to operate against Forrest's forces, then threatening our communications in the vicinity of Decatur and Athens, Alabama. The other two divisions remained in camp, holding themselves in readiness to move against Hood, as soon as the object of the movement he was then making on our right flank could be determined. On the third of October, in obedience to instructions from the headquarters of the military division of the Mississippi, following the Fourth corps, my command reached the Chattahoochee River, at the railroad crossing, at nightfall; but, owing to the rain and high water, the bridges became very insecure, and the crossing was not accomplished until the next morning. The troops only marched as far as Nickajack, and went into camp to await the arrival of the wagons, detained at the river by the crossing of Gen
consin, Tenth Wisconsin, and Fifteenth Kentucky. The entire Second brigade was detached about the last of September and ordered to Lookout Mountain. On the third of October, I commenced the campaign against the rebel army under Hood, who had gone to our rear and was operating on our communications. The march was continued daily Hood, through North-western Georgia to the border of Alabama. The following statements show the principal points arrived at during these marches. On the third day of October, the brigade marched with the division from Atlanta, and on the night of the fifth it bivouacked near Marietta. On the morning of the sixth, we again resuovements of this division in consequence: October first and second, division remained in camp, situated about one mile south of the city of Atlanta. On Monday, October third, at ten o'clock P. M., pursuant to orders from corps headquarters, tents were struck and the march commenced toward railroad bridge. Crossing the Chattaho
view with the division, but the review was prevented by rain. September 19.--Raised a flag-pole, and run up our garrison flag. September 20.--The regiment took part in the review of the division by Major-General Slocum. September 21 to October 3.--The regiment remained in same camp. October 4.--Moved at six o'clock P. M. into the rebel defences of the city of Atlanta, on the Marietta road; the One Hundred and Fiftieth regiment on the right of the brigade. Very large details of froment since the date of my last report made soon after the occupation of Atlanta, on the sixth of September: From this date to the fifth of November, the regiment remained in camp south of Atlanta, near the line of rebel works, and from the third of October to the last-named date, furnished nearly one half of the effective force of the regiment for fatigue and picket-duty; the fatigue-party having been engaged in building a new line of works about the city. On the fourteenth of September, two
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