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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Tennessee Volunteers. (search)
Camp Nelson July. Operations against Scott's forces in Eastern Kentucky July 25-August 6. Near Winchester July 29. Irvine July 30. Lancaster, Stanford and Pain's Lick Bridge July 31. Smith's Shoals, Cumberland River, August 1. Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 19. Jacksborough August 28. Winter's Gap August 31. Athens September 10 and 25. Calhoun September 18. Calhoun and Charleston September 25. Cleveland October 9. Philadelphia October 20-22. Sweetwater October 24. Leiper's Ferry October 28. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 23. Marysville November 14. Lenoir Station November 14-15. Near Loudoun and Holston River November 15. Campbell's Station November 16. Siege of Knoxville November 17-December 5. Russellville December 10. At and near Bean's Station December 9-15. Blain's Cross Roads December 16-19. Hay's Ferry, near Dandridge, December 24. Mossy Creek, Talbot Station, December
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, West Virginia Volunteers. (search)
le September 10. Cotton Hill September 11. Loop Creek September 11. Hurricane Bridge September 12. Charlestown September 13. At Point Pleasant to October 20. Moved to Charlestown October 20, thence to Camp Piatt. Expedition from Summerville to Cold Knob Mountain November 24-30. Lewis Mill on Sinking Creek NOctober 20, thence to Camp Piatt. Expedition from Summerville to Cold Knob Mountain November 24-30. Lewis Mill on Sinking Creek November 26. Peters Mountain Raid January 5-20, 1863. Scout into Wyoming County February 5-8. Expedition into Pocahontas County February 10-12. Scout through Boone, Wyoming and Logan Counties March 12-16. Expedition through Logan and Cabell Counties April 3-6. Mud River April 5. Lewisburg May 2. West Union Meptember 26. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence march to Chattanooga, Tenn., September 26-November 20. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Brier Creek, Tuscumbia, October 27. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hill November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Purs
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
to Patterson October 19. Expedition after Greene's guerrillas October 20-November 3. Duty at Patterson till January, 1863. Moved to g August 21-September 26. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-20. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8 (Reserve). Pittman's Cros20. Operations on the Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hiber 20. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hi left State for Winchester, Va., October 2. At Alexandria till October 20, then joined Regiment at Cedar Creek. Moved to Petersburg, Va.p at Bear Creek till September 26. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. At Big Black River Bridge till ber 20. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hi
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
Dept. of Arkansas to April, 1866. Service. Duty in District of Memphis, Tenn., till October, 1863. Left Memphis for Corinth, Miss., October 8, thence moved to Cherokee, Ala. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Barton Station, Cane Creek and Dickson's Station October 20. Cherokee Station October 21. Cane Creek October 26. Bear Creek, Tuscumbia, October 27. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. March to relief of KnoxvilleOctober 20. Cherokee Station October 21. Cane Creek October 26. Bear Creek, Tuscumbia, October 27. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 6. Near Loudon December 2 (Detachment). Expedition to Murphey, N. C., December 6-11 (Detachment). Moved to Huntsville, Ala., December 12-29, and duty there till March, 1864. Moved to St. Louis, Mo., March 6-7, thence to Devall's Bluff, Ark., May 20-26, and to Little Rock, Ark., June 4-9. Duty in the Dept. of Arkansas till April, 1866. Expedition from Little Rock to Little Red River August 6-16, 1864. Expedition from Little Rock to Fort Smith, Ar
avalry. On the 15th of April, 1863, he was commissioned by Governor Andrew colonel of the Second Regiment of Massachusetts Cavalry, a regiment which was recruited by him in this State. It was while raising and organizing this regiment that we became acquainted with him. On the 19th of October, 1864, he was made a brigadier-general of volunteers by President Lincoln. On the same day, he fell from his horse, from wounds received at the battle of Cedar Creek, and died on the day following, October 20. The writer was in Washington when the battle was fought in which Colonel Lowell was killed. The following is an extract from a letter addressed by me to Governor Andrew, and which is printed in the Adjutant-General's Report for 1864:— On arriving at my hotel in Washington, I had the honor of an introduction to Brigadier-General Custar, of General Sheridan's army. He had arrived in Washington that afternoon (Oct. 22) from the Shenandoah Valley, having in his custody twelve battle-
having the forts on the coast garrisoned with one year's troops, whose terms of service were soon to expire. I had a pleasant interview with the General, and with Colonel Van Buren, his chief of staff, and was informed that authority had already been forwarded to your Excellency to recruit one year's companies as requested; and Colonel Van Buren caused a copy of the authority to be made out, which I forwarded that evening to Major Brown, assistant Adjutant-General. On Thursday morning (Oct. 20), I met Brigadier-General Peirce, Inspector-General of the Commonwealth, who informed me that our Sixth Regiment had arrived in the city on its way home, its term of service being nearly completed, and that it was at the Battery Barracks. We visited the regiment soon afterwards, and found it in good condition; both officers and men were glad to see us. The regiment was to leave New York at three o'clock; and I had the honor of marching with Colonel Follansbee and his command up Broadway a
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, chapter 2.44 (search)
e states that he welcomes every one, and that he is preaching, even in jail, with great effect, upon the enormities of Slavery, and with arguments which every body fails to answer. His wounds, excepting one cut on the back of the head, have all now healed, without suppuration, and the scars are scarcely visible. He attributes his very rapid recovery to his strict abstemious habits through life. He is really a man of imposing appearance, and neither his tattered garments, the rents in which were caused by sword cuts, nor his scarred face, can detract from the manliness of his mien. He is always composed, and every trace of disquietude has left him. On the following day--Thursday, October 20-the body of Kagi was taken from the river, and the other corpses were buried in a large pit. The body of Watson Brown, however, was crammed into a box and carried off for medical dissection. The corpses of the negroes were horribly mutilated by the brutal populace. A. D. 1859-Va., U. S. A.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the preliminary examination. (search)
Chapter 1: the preliminary examination. The prisoners were formally committed to jail on the 20th of October, by a Justice of the Peace of Charlestown, on the oaths of Henry A. Wise and two others, for feloniously conspiring with each other-, and other persons unknown, to make an abolition insurrection and open war against the Commonwealth of Virginia, and for the additional crimes of murder and conspiring with slaves to rebel and to make insurrection. On the same day a warrant was issued to the Sheriff, commanding him to summon eight Justices of the Peace to hold a Preliminary Court of Examination on the 25th of October. On the day thus appointed the Preliminary Court assembled; a person named Colonel Davenport presiding. At half past 10 o'clock in the forenoon, the prisoners were conducted from the jail under a guard of eighty armed men. Another military force was stationed around the Court House, which was bristling with bayonets on all sides. John Brown and Coppie we
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers; also to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer to the number of ten, who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town; and that the cost of the same be assessed on the next annual assessment. August 29th, The selectmen were empowered to procure all money necessary by borrowing or otherwise, and pay the sum of one hundred dollars to each person entitled thereto when mustered into service. October 20th, Voted, to pay the five men now in camp at Greenfield, over and above our quota, one hundred dollars each. 1863. No action by the town appears to have been necessary in regard to military matters during this year. 1864. June 1st, The selectmen were authorized to borrow and pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars for seventeen volunteers, to fill the quotas of Pelham under the present and future calls for men. Pelham furnished seventy-eight men for the war, which was a surplus of
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
priv., (A), Aug. 10, 1861; 36; re-en. Dec. 21, 1863; died of w'nds May 10, 1864, Spottsylvania. Falls, Leander, S. sergt., (B), July 26, ‘61; 22; disch. disa. Oct. 20, ‘62 as priv. Fane, William, priv., (G), May 13, ‘64; 18; sub. A. H. Page; M. O. June 30, ‘65 as abs. sick. Fanning, Edward, priv., Aug. 9, ‘61; 19; no service. Q. M. June 30, ‘65. Jewett, Henry B., priv., (C), July 26, ‘61; 18; abs. sick; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Jewett, Wm. H., priv., (C), Dec. 30, ‘61; 42; disch. disa. Oct. 20, ‘62. Jewett, Wm. H. 2nd., priv., (C), Feb. 17, ‘62; 33; died July 1, ‘62 at Harrison's Landing, Va. Johnson, Bernard, priv., (—), Mar. 29, ‘64; 28; transf. to sch. disa. May 3, ‘62. Murphy, Thomas, priv., (H), July 26, ‘61; wounded and missing June 30, 1862; N. F.R. Murray, John, priv., (H), Aug. 12, ‘61; 24; deserted Oct. 20, ‘61. Murray, John, priv., (H), May 13, ‘64; 26; sub. Chas. Williams; abs. pris. June 22, ‘64; not heard from since. Murray, T
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