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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 68: French army maneuvers, 1884; promotion to Major General, United States army, San Francisco 1886-88 (search)
ne. October 18th, early in the morning, we were at last at Sandy Hook and by twelve noon were at Jersey City. The Customhouse officers were polite and pleasant to us, so that we were not long detained. I hastened to Brooklyn. There Mrs. Buck and her sister were in great sorrow. Mr. R. P. Buck, almost the last one to bid me Godspeed on my departure, had died during my absence. I had not a better friend outside my family, and I sorrowed with them. After a few days in New York, October 20th, with my party I set out for the West. My boys and the officers met us at the depot in Omaha, and all the family were soon gathered around the home table once more. In the spring of 1885, having an inspection tour to make to the Yellowstone National Park, which was within the limits of my department, I enjoyed a brief sojourn with Mrs. Howard and a party of friends amid the wonders of that region. The traces of my route when pursuing Chief Joseph in the Nez Perces War, were still vis
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
he fugitives were corroborated. The circumstances that gave rise to the battle of Ball's Bluff, and the main features of that massacre, belong to this story, and may be told in a few words. General Charles P. Stone commanded what he called a corps of observation, on the Maryland side of the Potomac River. His pickets extended from the mouth of the Monocacy, on the north, to meet with those of Banks's division on the south. Stone occupied Poolsville as his headquarters. Between the twentieth and twenty-second of October General McCall had advanced from the Army of the Potomac on the right bank of that river as far as Drainsville, his object being to ascertain the number and intentions of the enemy at Leesburg. In co-operating with this movement General Stone sent a large force to Edward's Ferry, and increased the command at Harrison's Island. At Edward's Ferry, three miles from Poolsville, Stone made a feint of crossing the river, on the 20th, at one o'clock P. M. Several b
rce in and around Leesburg was about two thousand men. It was a brigade composed of three Mississippi regiments and the 8th Virginia, commanded by Gen. Evans, whose name had been conspicuous on the field of Manassas. Before day broke on the 20th of October, the men were drawn up in line of battle, and Evans addressed them thus: Gentlemen, the enemy are approaching by the Dranesville road, sixteen thousand strong, with twenty pieces of artillery. They want to cut off our retreat. Reinforcemene. His papers betrayed sufficient to reveal that it was designed to draw the Confederates from Leesburg along the Dranesville road, while Stone crossed the river and occupied the town. Gen. Stone commenced the passage of the river on the 20th of October. A force of five companies of Massachusetts troops, commanded by Col. Devins, effected a crossing at Edwards' Ferry, and, a few hours thereafter, Col. Baker, who took command of all the Federal forces on the Virginia side, having been order
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
e observance or neglect of the ordinances to do with the anti-slavery cause? The Spectator had meantime come out openly in favor Lib. 7.169. of a new anti-slavery organization, to include men who kept aloof from the existing one on sectarian grounds— a great proportion of the Orthodox community, declared a correspondent of that paper; adding: Orthodox men cannot be active in that society without having their feelings wounded. These tactics did not disconcert Mr. Garrison. He wrote on October 20 to George W. Benson: Truly, there is but one step from the sublime to the Ms. ridiculous—from pathos to bathos—from what is true to what is false. Hence I descend to the Clerical Appeal. Was ever treachery so signally punished as in the case of the signers of that unfortunate document! What an avalanche of condemnation has fallen upon their heads, grinding them to powder! What expressions of regard for the liberator and its editor have been extorted by their conduct! But the c<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, III: the boy student (search)
bucket & brought it up to Mason's room! He also mentions his attire on this important day, when he escorted his mother and sisters to the chapel wearing black coat, new pants, dark veskit, blk stockings & pumps. His report of a later exhibition is not quite so creditable:— Oct. 2. Had the pleasure of finishing my oration & rewriting a good deal of it, wh. delighted me & I spent the rest of the day in reading Rookwood— also the eve'g—comfort, fire, 3 candles, rock'g chair. Oct. 20. Exhib. passed off well. . . . I was perfectly self-possessed, but owing to looking round on the audience &c. did n't know what I was saying, made mistakes, hesitated & omitted—but they did n't perceive it & thought it good. In order to save time, Mr. Higginson constantly used abbreviations as above. Such words are henceforth given in full to avoid confusion. The next interesting event seems to have been Wentworth's admission to the Phi Beta Kappa. In an address before this socie
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
lmoral; long conversations with Lord Haddo and Mr. Arthur Gordon. October 18. Sunday. At twelve o'clock went to the kirk two miles, and heard a Presbyterian sermon and prayers; long walk and conversation with Lord Aberdeen in the grounds. October 19. Left Haddo House at half-past 7 o'clock for Aberdeen; drove round this place; then by train to William Stirling's at Keir, five miles from Stirling; beautiful grounds, and house full of curiosities; among the guests was Mrs. Norton. October 20. The forenoon spent in examining the curiosities collected in the house and library; then drove with Mrs. Norton to the castle of Stirling; dinner; pleasant evening. October 21. Left Keir at eight o'clock with post horses for Callander; then for the Trossachs; crossed Loch Katrine (twelve miles) in an open boat during two severe rain squalls; then a drosky to Inversnaid on Loch Lomond; then boat five miles to Tarbet; then post horses through Glencroe to Inverary Castle, where I arrived
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
t was near at hand, began to start enterprises on the strength of his prediction and supposed authority. They applied to him for a more definite statement, and he answered that he had only said pointedly at Newcastle what he had said nine months before at Leith, that the effort of the Northern States was a hopeless one; and he suggested that there was an interval between opinions and the steps which give them effect. Letters in his behalf by C. L. Ryan, October 16 and 18. London Times, October 20 and 24. Shortly after, in an open corespondence with Prof. F. W. Newman, he called the struggle of our government to maintain itself a hopeless and destructive enterprise. Dec. 1, 1862. Professor Newman's letter, November 28, calls Gladstone the admirer of perjured men. Gladstone's rejoinder of December 4 was published in the London Star. (New York Tribune, December 12 and 20.) Mr. Gladstone's pro-slavery sympathies and partiality for the Southern rebellion were treated in Letters on
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Thirteenth regiment Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
panies already existing, and was mustered into the service of the United States July 12, 1861. Its colonel, Charles Devens, Jr., at the time of his appointment stationed at Fort McHenry, Md., as colonel of the 3d Battalion Rifles, M. V. M., joined the regiment in July. August 8 it left the State for Washington, and two weeks later moved to Poolesville, Md., and was stationed on the upper Potomac. It was the first to take part in the battle of Ball's Bluff; crossing the river the night of October 20, it engaged in action the next morning and shared in the final battle of the afternoon, meeting heavy loss in killed, wounded and prisoners. In February, 1862, the regiment moved to Harper's Ferry and engaged in reconnoitering in the Shenandoah valley. Returning to Washington, it joined the Army of the Potomac on the Peninsula April 1, and took part in the siege of Yorktown; here the Andrew Sharpshooters were attached to the regiment and remained with it until the spring of 1863. As par
haise trimmer; he res. on the northwest corner of Pearl and Green streets, where he d. 6 May 1862; his wife Nabby d. 21 Jan. 1851. 11. Samuel, s. of Torrey (9), m. Ann Bird of Dorchester 20 Nov. 1808, and had Royal Bird, b. 23 Sept. 1809, printer, res. in India, and was long under the auspices of the Baptist Missionary Union; he m. Abigail S. Thayer 10 June 1832, and (2d) Sarah, dau. of Deac. William Brown and wid. of Dr. John W. Valentine, 1842; she d. here 2 July 1868; Martha Ward, b. 20 Oct. 1811, d. unm. 11 Oct. 1867; Joanna Bird, b. 24 Ap. 1814, m.——, d. Samuel the f. was a chaise maker, and in later life a pump maker; he res. on the southeast corner of Magazine and Auburn streets, and d. 13 Ap. 1860; his w. Ann d. 2 May 1864. a. 78. 12. Torrey, s. of Torrey (9), m. Olive Orcutt 28 Feb. 1805; she d. 11 Oct. 1809, aged 34, and he m. Isabella Rice of Wayland 5 June 1811, who was bur. 29 May 1838, aged 48. His chil. were Ann Elizabeth, b. 8 June 1807, m. John Dolbeare of N
haise trimmer; he res. on the northwest corner of Pearl and Green streets, where he d. 6 May 1862; his wife Nabby d. 21 Jan. 1851. 11. Samuel, s. of Torrey (9), m. Ann Bird of Dorchester 20 Nov. 1808, and had Royal Bird, b. 23 Sept. 1809, printer, res. in India, and was long under the auspices of the Baptist Missionary Union; he m. Abigail S. Thayer 10 June 1832, and (2d) Sarah, dau. of Deac. William Brown and wid. of Dr. John W. Valentine, 1842; she d. here 2 July 1868; Martha Ward, b. 20 Oct. 1811, d. unm. 11 Oct. 1867; Joanna Bird, b. 24 Ap. 1814, m.——, d. Samuel the f. was a chaise maker, and in later life a pump maker; he res. on the southeast corner of Magazine and Auburn streets, and d. 13 Ap. 1860; his w. Ann d. 2 May 1864. a. 78. 12. Torrey, s. of Torrey (9), m. Olive Orcutt 28 Feb. 1805; she d. 11 Oct. 1809, aged 34, and he m. Isabella Rice of Wayland 5 June 1811, who was bur. 29 May 1838, aged 48. His chil. were Ann Elizabeth, b. 8 June 1807, m. John Dolbeare of N
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