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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 1 1 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Spain, War with (search)
f the War Department began its sessions at Washington. Oct. 1. The conferences of the peace commissioners began in Paris. Oct. 12. The battle-ships Oregon and Iowa sailed from New York for Manila. Oct. 18. Peace jubilee celebration at Chicago. Oct. 18. The American army and navy took formal possession of the island of Porto Rico at San Juan. Oct. 24. Time limit for the evacuation of Cuba by the Spaniards was extended to Jan. 1, 1899. Oct. 27. After a long and earnest contention the Spanish peace commissioners accepted the American ultimatum not to assume the Spanish Cuban debt. Oct. 31. The United States peace commissioners presented the demand of the United States for the Philippines. Nov. 1. The captured cruiser Infanta Maria Teresa was abandoned in a gale off San Salvador. Nov. 7. The Cuban Assembly was organized at Santa Cruz del Sur. Domingo Mendez Capote was elected president. Dec. 10. The treaty of peace was signed at Paris at 8.45 P. M.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
re......Nov. 20, 1826 Joseph Smith, the Mormon leader, having found a location for Zion at Independence, Jackson county, in 1831, which he names The New Jerusalem, arrives from Kirtland, O., with many followers......1832 St. Louis University, founded 1829; incorporated......December, 1832 Mormons in Missouri publish a paper, the Evening Star, the sentiments of which are obnoxious to the people, who tar and feather the bishop and two others, and throw the presses into the river. On Oct. 31 an encounter occurs in which two citizens and one Mormon are killed. On Nov. 2 the Mormons attack Independence, but are routed and forced to promise to leave the county before. Jan. 1, 1834......Nov. 2, 1833 Congress adds the Platte purchase, a triangle north of the Missouri River, west of the western boundary of the State, and south of the northern boundary to Missouri, thus making it slave territory......June 7, 1836 Depredations and murders in Carroll county traced to a band of d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washingtoniana. -1857 (search)
ber, 1753, from whom he gained permission to build a fort at the junction of that river and the Alleghany, now Pittsburg. He also resolved to send a competent messenger to the nearest French post, with a letter demanding explanations, and the release and indemnification of the English traders whom the French had robbed and imprisoned. He chose for this delicate and hazardous service George Washington, then not twenty-two years of age. With three attendants, Washington left Williamsburg, Oct. 31, and, after journeying more than 400 miles (more than half the distance through a dark wilderness), encountering incredible hardships and dangers, amid snow and icy floods and hostile Indians, he reached the French post of Venango, Dec. 4, where he was politely received, and his visit was made the occasion of great conviviality by the officers of the garrison. He had been joined at Cumberland (Md.) by five others. The free use of wine disarmed the French of their prudence, and they reveal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White Plains, battle of. (search)
an troops passed the Bronx and attacked the Americans on Chatterton's Hill. Hamilton's little battery made them recoil at first, but, being reinforced, they drove the Americans from their position. McDougall led his troops to Washington's camp, leaving the British in possession of the hill. Washington's breastworks were composed of corn-stalks covered rather hastily and lightly by earth; but they appeared so formidable that Howe dared not attack them, but waited for reinforcements. Just as they appeared a severe storm of wind and rain set in. Washington perceiving Howe's advantage, withdrew under cover of darkness, in the night of Oct. 31, behind intrenchments on the hills of North Castle, towards the Croton River. Howe did not follow; but, falling back, encamped on the heights of Fordham. The loss of the Americans in the skirmishes on Oct. 26, and the battle on the 28th, did not exceed, probably, 300 men in killed, wounded, and prisoners; that of the British was about the same.
d fitted up as a tender, and that she anchored nearly every evening under the island of Krakatoa. Two days afterward, we boarded a Dutch ship, from Batavia to Amsterdam, which informed us, that a boat from the Wyoming had boarded her, off the town of Anger in the Strait. There seemed, therefore, to be little doubt, that if we attempted the Strait, we should find an enemy barring our passage. As we drew near the Strait, we began to fall in with ships in considerable numbers. On the 31st of October, no less than six were cried from aloft, at the same time, all standing to the south-west, showing that they were just out of the famous passage. The wind being light and baffling, we got up steam, and chased and boarded four of them—three English, and one Dutch. By this time, the others were out of sight—reported, by those we had overhauled, to be neutral—and the night was setting in dark and rainy. The Dutch ship, like the last one we had boarded, was from Batavia, and corroborate<
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
parture for Saltillo. Major Graham promised to take it with him, so I presume it will reach you in safety. Also Robert McLane, who said he was going direct to Philadelphia, promised to call and see you on his arrival, and tell you all about me. You, therefore, will be in better luck than myself, for I suppose you will receive all my letters, and have verbal accounts of me, whereas I find on my return no mails have arrived in my absence, and to-night, letters for others, as late as the 31st of October, without any for me, my last date being the 9th of October. I know, of course, you have written, and attribute my misfortune to the negligence of the postmasters between here and Matamoras, who seem to do just as they please about forwarding the letters of officers. Some kind friend on the route has imagined I have gone to Tampico, or that I am killed perhaps, and that there is no necessity to send my letters forward; there must be some such reason as this, the fact being I receive no
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 7 (search)
hat withdrawn from active connection with those in power at the seat of government. And thus, from every point of view, a long, unclouded future seemed assured. His last official letter notified the department of the death of Colonel Hartman Bache, of the engineers, one of his earliest commanding officers, and no one who saw him at the funeral of that officer dreamed that within a month they would be called upon to perform the same sad rites for him. He was, as usual, in his office on October 31, attending to his duties and seemingly in excellent health. About noon Mrs. Meade called for him, and they left the office together for their daily walk. They had gone but a short distance when the general complained of severe pains in his side, which increasing in violence, he went directly home. By the time he had reached home his suffering had become so intense that the family physician, Doctor John Neill, was summoned, and pronounced the attack a severe case of pneumonia. Whilst
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, California Volunteers. (search)
California Volunteers. 1st California Regiment Cavalry Organized as a Battalion of 5 Companies at Camp Merchant, near Oakland, Cali., and mustered in as follows: Co. A, August 16; Co. B, October 31; Co. C, October 31; Co. D, September 9, and Co. E, August 15, 1861. 7 new Companies organized and mustered in as follows: Co. F, December 15; Co. G, June 13; Co. H, December 31; Co. I, November 12; Co. K, May 16; Co. L, August 15, and Co. M, May 16, 1863. Service. Companies A, B, C, DOctober 31; Co. D, September 9, and Co. E, August 15, 1861. 7 new Companies organized and mustered in as follows: Co. F, December 15; Co. G, June 13; Co. H, December 31; Co. I, November 12; Co. K, May 16; Co. L, August 15, and Co. M, May 16, 1863. Service. Companies A, B, C, D, E moved to Southern California and duty at Los Angeles (3 Cos.) and at San Bernardino (2 Cos.) till March, 1862. Pursuit and capture of Showalter's party at Warner's Ranch, near San Jose Valley, November 20-29, 1861 (Detachment). Attached to Carlton's California Column, organized for an Expedition to recapture the Forts and Posts in Arizona and New Mexico, March, 1862. March to Stanwix Rancho, Arizona, March 1-16. Carlton's Expedition through Arizona to Northwest Texas and Indian T
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Connecticut Volunteers. (search)
north side of the James September 27-28. Battle of Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Darbytown and New Market Roads October 7. Darbytown Road October 13. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. In front of Richmond October 31-November 2. Detached for duty at New York City during Presidential election of 1864, November 2-17. Duty in trenches before Richmond till January 3, 1865. Second expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January Half 15. Assault and capturement lost during service 10 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 240 Enlisted men by disease. Total 253. 10th Connecticut Regiment Infantry. Organized at Hartford October 22, 1861. Left State for Annapolis, Md., October 31 and duty there till January 6, 1862. Attached to Foster's 1st Brigade, Burnside's Expeditionary Corps, to April, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of North Carolina to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 18th Army Corps, Dep
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Florida Volunteers. (search)
er, 1865. Service. Duty at Fort Myers, Cedar Keys and in District of Key West till June, 1865. Skirmishes at Pease Creek, Florida, February 13-14 and February 20, 1864. Attack on Fort Myers February 20. Affair at Tampa May 6. Operations on West Coast of Florida July 1-31. Expedition to Bayport July 1-4. Skirmish at Station Four, near Cedar Keys, July 6. Expedition to St. Andrews Bay July 20-29. Fort Myers August 26. Expedition to Bayport October 1, and to St. Andrews Bay October 20-29. Near Magnolia October 24. Expedition to Otter Creek, on Florida R. R., October 30-31. Braddock's Farm, near Welaka, February 5, 1865. Station Four, near Cedar Keys, February 13. Attack on Fort Myers February 20. Operations near St. Marks February 21-March 7. East River Bridge March 4-5. Newport Bridge March 5-6. Natural Bridge March 6. Occupation of Tampa May 27. Duty in District of Florida till November. Mustered out November 29, 1865.
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