Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for November 13th or search for November 13th in all documents.

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cession, after passing the President's house, halted at that of General McClellan, and serenaded the General. Speeches were delivered by Secretary Cameron, Mr. Seward, and Gen. Blenker, after which the procession moved through the city and across the Potomac.--A reconnaissance was made by Col. Weber in the direction of New Market bridge, near Fortress Monroe. The rebels were met in some force, but were compelled to retire with a loss of two killed and several wounded.--N. Y. Commercial, November 13. The Fifty-second N. Y. regiment, Col. Paul Frank, left its encampment on Staten Island, and proceeded to Amboy on its way to Washington. The regiment numbers nearly a thousand men, all of whom are thoroughly uniformed, armed, and equipped.--N. Y. Times, Nov. 12. Within the last ten days over fourteen Volunteer Refreshment Saloons, in Philadelphia, Pa. From the 2d to the 8th inst., nine thousand and seventeen troops were transported over the Camden and Amboy, and Philadelphia,
companies of the Fifth regiment N. Y. S. V., or New York Zouaves, left their encampment at Federal Hill, near Baltimore, and took the steamer Pocahontas, for Salisbury, Md. They were commanded by Col. Governeur K. Warren.--Baltimore American, November 13. Several new military departments were defined by general order as follows: The Department of New Mexico is to be commanded by Col. E. R. S. Canby; the Department of Kansas, including Kansas, part of the Indian Territory, Nebraska, Colora Cumberland River, and Tennessee, is to be commanded by Brig.-Gen. Buell; the Department of Western Virginia, including that portion of the State lately in the old Department of Ohio, is to be commanded by Brig.-Gen. Rosecrans.--N. Y. Tribune, November 13. An attack was made on the vessels of the United States fleet, in the Mississippi River, at the head of the Passes, by the steam ram Manassas, accompanied and assisted by the Calhoun, three guns; the Joy, two guns; the Jackson, two guns;
November 13. The Legislature of Tennessee passed a law authorizing Governor Harris, of that State, to seize all private arms and call ten thousand men into service. The Eleventh regiment Maine Volunteers, under command of Colonel Caldwell, passed through Boston to-day, en route for Annapolis, Md., to join Gen. Burnside's brigade. They were accompanied by one hundred and ten men, sharpshooters, commanded by Capt. James D. Fessenden, (a son of Senator Fessenden,) and one hundred recruits for the Fourth Maine regiment.--Boston Evening Transcript, Nov. 14. Gen. Zollicoffer, with his entire army, retreated from Cumberland Ford to Cumberland Gap, Tenn., and blockaded the road along the entire distance by blasting immense rocks from the hills on either side.--N. Y. Times, Nov. 16. To-day, at Washington, Colonel John Cochrane delivered an address to his regiment in the presence of Secretary Cameron and other distinguished persons. The most important point in his argu
November 13. Earl Russell replied, officially, to the circular of Drouyn De Lhuys, proposing mediation in the affairs of the United States of America, dissenting from the French proposition for the reasons, that there is no ground, at the present moment, to hope that the Federal Government would accept the proposal suggested, and a refusal from Washington, at the present time, would prevent any speedy renewal of the offer of the government. --See Supplement. The Fifteenth regiment of New Hampshire volunteers, under the command of Colonel John W. Kingman, left Concord, for the rendezvous of General Banks's expedition, on Long Island, N. Y.--Governor Brown, of Georgia, sent a message to the General Assembly of that State, in reference to the raids of negroes in Camden County.--(Doc. 44.) At seven o'clock this morning, Colonel Lee, chief of cavalry on the staff of General Hamilton, took possession of Holly Springs, Miss., after a slight skirmish, in which four rebels wer
November 13. A skirmish took place near Natchez, Miss., between company H, of the Seventy-first Illinois regiment, and a few volunteers of the Sixth Mississippi regiment of loyal colored troops, and the rebel cavalry under Adams and Mosby. The circumstances are as follows: The wagons of the above command were sent out for forage, the company just designated was detailed as an escort, and left camp at seven A. M. After proceeding about one mile and a half a small force of rebels was seen, the company halted, and a messenger was despatched to inform the commanding officer, and report for instructions. Immediately on receipt of the news, Colonel Smith took the camp-guard and proceeded out on the Washington road, came up to where the foraging party had halted, and ordered it forward. [It is necessary here to state that this road leads to a village, bearing the same name, some six miles distant from this place, and two miles out it intersects the Palestine road, both of which run