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The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 2 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
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The Lame, the halt, and the blind, to bear arms.--The following advertisement appeared in a late Richmond paper: wanted — For local purposes, a company of a hundred men, who are not capable of performing service in the field, yet are able to perform duty in the city. None need apply who are capable of field service, and good references will be required as to character. Apply at the office, corner of Broad and Ninth streets. Jno. H. Winder, Brigadier-General. --N. Y. Herald, Dec. 17
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
less our candidate is chosen. If he fails we intend to prostrate the Government and break up the Union; peaceably, if the States composing the majority are willing that it should be broken up peaceably; otherwise, at the point of the sword. South Carolina Secedes from the Union. The election took place on the 6th of November, and in pursuance of the extraordinary programme just described, the State of South Carolina, acting by a Convention chosen for the purpose, assembled on the 17th of December, and on the 20th, passed unanimously what was styled an ordinance to dissolve the Union between the State of South Carolina and other States united with her, under the compact entitled the Constitution, of the United States of America. It is not my purpose on this occasion to make a documentary speech, but as this so-called Ordinance is very short, and affords matter for deep reflection, I beg leave to recite it in full: We, the People of the State of South Carolina, in Conventi
modern sieges. Indeed, his operations on Morris Island constitute almost a new era in the science of engineering and gunnery. Since the capture of Forts Wagner and Gregg, he has enlarged the works, and established powerful batteries, which effectually command Fort Sumter, and can render efficient aid to any naval attack upon Charleston. They also control the entrance to the harbor. Department of the Gulf. Major-General Banks took command of the Department of the Gulf on the seventeenth of December. Almost immediately on assuming command, he ordered a detachment of troops to Galveston, Texas, to occupy that place under the protection of our gunboats. Colonel Burrill, with three companies of the Forty-second Massachusetts volunteers, the advance of the expedition, arrived at that place on the evening of the twenty-fourth December. On consultation with the commander of the blockading force, he landed his men upon the wharf, and took possession of the city on the first of Janu
ligently performed all their duties. Lieutenant H. C. Wharton, a promising young officer of engineers, reported to me from the staff of the Major-General commanding the department, and was unwearied in his assistance, both as an engineer and as an officer of my personal staff. Major-General Howard has furnished me for transmittal his able report of the operations and services of the Eleventh corps from the time it passed my command, November twenty-second, to that of its return, December seventeenth. As it relates to events of which I had no personal knowledge, it only remains to comply with his wishes, with the request that the Major-General commanding the department will give it his especial attention. I may add that the zeal and devotedness displayed by this corps and its commander, in performing all the duties assigned them, and in cheerfully encountering its perils and privations, afford me great satisfaction. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Joseph Hooker, Ma
ails. The rebels pressed down considerably till about ten o'clock A. M., then drew back out of reach, and remained silent till about sundown. They began to show themselves on the mountains, trying to move around our flanks. They had managed to get a battery on the mountains on our right, and about sundown began to hand down a few shells. After dark we commenced falling back; passed through Rutledge. December sixteenth, fell back to Blain's Cross-Roads, near the Ruined house. December seventeenth, remained in line of battle; some skirmishing in the front. December eighteenth, our regiment was relieved from the front, and moved to the rear, and went into camp, and was paid off; received two months pay; at night, moved out about five miles to Holston, near McKinney's Ferry, near the mouth of Richland Creek. December nineteenth, came back to Blain's Cross-Roads. Remained here till the twenty-first. Our brigade is about one third dismounted. At two o'clock on the evening
, Col. S. D. Roddy; several boxes of canteens; a quantity of confederate army clothing; over one hundred new wall-tents, with flies, etc., complete; some commissary stores, (embracing several barrels of sugar,) small arms, and ammunition. Eight wagons, pressed for the purpose, were loaded and brought away, and the rest of the spoils destroyed at the spot. On our march, returning, a bridge gave way in the night, and the loads were burned, and the wagons abandoned. Wednesday night, December seventeenth, our whole party camped at Harrisburgh, a deserted town, about two miles north-west of Tupelo. Thursday morning, the eighteenth, before day, we took up the line of march on our return, and halted the forenoon to feed, about nine miles east of Pontotoc. At about noon, at a point about six miles east of Pontotoc, riding in advance with my escort, I learned that a large rebel cavalry force, said to be six thousand or seven thousand, were in Pontotoc. Thinking that this force wa
ll requisite information gained, when, in accordance with the expressed wish of the General-in-Chief, I abandoned my designs of attack, and, with my command, moved to reconnoitre St. Catharine's Sound, and open up communication with our fleet. This was accomplished before ten o'clock the same day on which Fort McAllister fell. December 16. The command returned to the vicinity of Kingsbridge and went into camp, picketing the Canoucher and country in the direction of the Altamaha. December 17. Colonel Atkins, with upward of two thousand (2000) men of my command, moved in conjunction with a division of infantry, under General Mower, to destroy a portion of the Gulf Railroad, and, if possible, the railroad over the Altamaha. Difficulty of approaches and a strong force of the enemy, which could not be dislodged, prevented the accomplishment of the latter. The railroad, however, was very thoroughly destroyed, and the command returned to camp. December 21. The enemy evac
December 17. Colonel Atkins, with upward of two thousand (2000) men of my command, moved in conjunction with a division of infantry, under General Mower, to destroy a portion of the Gulf Railroad, and, if possible, the railroad over the Altamaha. Difficulty of approaches and a strong force of the enemy, which could not be dislodged, prevented the accomplishment of the latter. The railroad, however, was very thoroughly destroyed, and the command returned to camp.
men only, and cross them in small boats. December 17.--I found it impossible to cross one hundrearolina shore, and from a rebel gunboat. December 17th.--Lay in same position. Threw up some slountifully. Crossed the river in scows. December 17 and 18.---Remained in same position. Decequently. Very few casualties occurred. December 17.--The work on Fort No. 1 (that in the left dent of note occurred during these days. December 17.--Still in the same position. Received ouristance. The wound he received on Saturday, December seventeenth, having resulted in the loss of hicompany E, captain, left leg amputated, December seventeenth; Evan Owens, company B, private, right leg amputated, December seventeenth; George Free, company B, private, shoulder, slight, December sevDecember seventeenth; Nicholas Cavenaugh, company B, private, hip, severe, December sixteenth; James Earley, comyards of the enemy's line of battle. December seventeenth, remained in position; details from the[2 more...]
lry corps, were ordered in a second gum-tree canoe, to pull out to a vessel whose mast-head was discovered in the offing. After a row of twelve or fifteen miles we spoke the Bark Fernandina, United States navy, Captain West commanding, were courteously received and furnished a boat's crew and cutter, and with an officer of the vessel reported to General Kilpatrick, who immediately forwarded despatches to the flag-ship. Having reported again to my brigade, the regiment moved on the seventeenth December with the expedition which destroyed Morgan Lake and River Swamp Trestle, near the Altamaha River, on the Gulf Railroad. During the campaign, the regiment lost one man killed in action, twelve men wounded, eleven men captured by the enemy, (seven of whom were captured near Shoals of Ogeechee, while foraging for horses,) and nine horses killed. My report would be incomplete, did I not mention Major D. V. Rannells, Surgeon, who, with remarkable assiduity and great skill, made the c
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