Your search returned 776 results in 510 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
mpelled by the exigencies of public duties connected with my late command to defer until this time a report of the recent operations about Winchester. Having no reports from brigade commanders and not even an opportunity of conferring with them, I am still unable to give a detailed report. A sense of duty to myself and to the officers and soldiers which I had the honor to command requires that I should submit some general statements. I occupied Winchester with my command on the twenty-fifth of December last, and continued in its occupancy until Monday morning, the fifteenth instant, when, for reasons which will appear in the sequel of this report, I was compelled to evacuate it. When I first occupied Winchester, the valley of the Shenandoah, from Staunton to Strasburgh, was occupied by the rebel General Jones, with a force variously estimated at from five to six thousand men, and constituted principally of cavalry. Imboden at the same time occupied the Cacapon Valley with a force
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), A friendly interview between pickets. (search)
A friendly interview between pickets. A correspondent writing from the Ninth army corps, opposite Fredericksburgh, Va., narrates the following, which occurred on Christmas-day, 1862, while the writer was out on picket with his company: After partaking of a Christmas dinner of salt junk and hard tack, our attention was attracted by a rebel picket, who hailed us from the opposite side of the river: I say, Yank, if a fellow goes over there, will you let him come back again? Receiving aChristmas dinner of salt junk and hard tack, our attention was attracted by a rebel picket, who hailed us from the opposite side of the river: I say, Yank, if a fellow goes over there, will you let him come back again? Receiving an affirmative answer, he proceeded to test the truth of it by paddling himself across the river. He was de. cidedly the cleanest specimen of a rebel I had seen. In answer to a question, he said he belonged to the Georgia Legion. One of our boys remarked: I met quite a number of your boys at South-Mountain. Yes, I suppose so, if you were there, said the rebel, while his face grew very sad. We left very many of our boys there. My brother, poor Will, was killed there. It was a very hot place f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
e bride. General Bragg and his staff, with a few of Morgan's comrades, were gathered as witnesses in the front parlor. General Polk, Bishop of Louisiana, performed the ceremony and gave the blessing. That evening Morgan and his command left Murfreesboro' on a raid toward Kentucky. Social recreation at Murfreesboro' at this time was at its zenith; Christmas was approaching. The young officers of our army were all bent on fun and gayety. Invitations were out for a ball on the day after Christmas.--D. U. sent dispatches in quick succession to headquarters reporting a general advance of Rosecrans's army. Soon all was bustle and activity. General Hardee's corps at Triune was ordered to Murfreesboro‘. Camps were at once broken up and everything was made ready for active service. On the 27th of December our army was moving. On Sunday, December 28th, Polk and Hardee met at General Bragg's headquarters to learn the situation and his plans. Rosecrans was advancing from Nashville wi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
march was then resumed in the direction of Columbia, Stewart's corps moving in front, followed by those of Cheatham and Stevenson. The army bivouacked in line of battle near Duck River on the night of the 1 8th. The following day we crossed the river and proceeded on different roads leading toward Bainbridge on the Tennessee. I entertained but little concern in regard to being further harassed by the enemy. I therefore continued to march leisurely, and arrived at Bainbridge on the 25th of December. The following day the march was continued in the direction of Tupelo, at which place Cheatham's corps, the last in the line of march, went into camp on the 10th of.January, 1865. On the 13th of January I sent the following dispatch to the Secretary of War: I request to be relieved from the command of this army. Upon General Beauregard's arrival at Tupelo, on the 14th of January, I informed him of my application to be relieved from the command of the army. I again telegraphed th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
mparatively slow. But, withal, the enemy was closely pressed and every opportunity was seized upon to bring him to bay. In the vicinity of Lynnville, the country being somewhat more open, he was driven back rapidly, and at Buford's station, while General Hatch was engaging him upon the turnpike, General Croxton struck him in the flank, captured one flag and a number of prisoners, wounded General Abram Buford, and drove his cavalry rapidly beyond Richland Creek. Just before sundown on Christmas day Forrest, in a fit of desperation, made a stand on a heavily wooded ridge at the head of a ravine, and by a rapid and savage counter-thrust drove back the skirmishers of Thomas Harrison's brigade, capturing one gun, which he succeeded in carrying away, as the sole trophy of that desperate campaign. This was the last flicker of aggressive temper shown by any part of Hood's beaten and demoralized army. Hammond, Hatch, and Croxton hastened to the front, and falling upon the flanks of the g
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The defense of Fort Fisher. (search)
ey brought off, killing the orderly, who was the bearer of a dispatch from the chief of artillery of General Whiting, to bring a light battery within the fort, and also brought away from the parapet the flag of the fort. This piece of romance was sent North, and has gotten a lodgment in current history, and is actually repeated by General Grant in his Memoirs, though General Butler corrected the error in his official report of January 3d, 1865. No Federal soldier entered Fort Fisher Christmas day, except as a prisoner. The courier was sent out of the fort without my knowledge, and was killed and his horse captured within the enemy's lines. The flag captured was a small company flag, placed on the extreme left of the work, and which was carried away and thrown off the parapet by an enfilading shot from the navy. It was during a terrific bombardment of the land-face, when I had ordered my men to cover them-selves behind parapet and traverses as well as in the bomb-proofs. Amid
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Navy at Fort Fisher. (search)
made. Five guns were disabled by the fire of the fleet, making eight in all. Besides, two 7-inch Briooke rifled guns exploded, leaving thirty-four heavy guns on Christmas night. The last guns on the 24th and 25th were fired by Fort Fisher on the retiring fleet. In the first fight the total casualties were 61, as follows: December 24th, mortally wounded, 1; seriously 3; slightly, 19=23. December 25th, killed, 3; mortally wounded, 2; severely, 7; slightly, 26. These included those wounded by the explosion of the Brooke rifled guns = 38. that not a man had been injured by their fire, though several ships had sustained losses by the bursting of their 100-pounear her magazine, but was saved from sinking by her captain, Commander Clitz. During the bombardment the transports, with troops, arrived from Beaufort. On Christmas day, as agreed upon between Admiral Porter and General Butler, the smaller vessels were engaged in covering the disembarkation of the troops, while the iron-clads
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
ion perceives no heroism more genuine and useful than that displayed by this noble woman; and history and romance will ever delight to celebrate her deed. We have observed that the occupation of Sumter created great exasperation among the conspirators. They had been outgeneraled, and were mortified beyond measure. They did not expect so daring an assumption of responsibility by the gentle, placid Major, who, only the day before, had accepted their proffered hospitality, and eaten a Christmas dinner in Charleston with some of the magnates of the city and State. Little did they suspect, when seeing him quietly participating in the festivities of the occasion, that, within thirty hours, he would extinguish, for a season, the most sanguine hopes of the South Carolina conspirators. It was even so; and they had no alternative but to consider his movement as an act of war. They did so, and proceeded upon that assumption. The Charleston Courier declared that Major Robert Anderson, of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
appeals to the North Carolinians, 177. spirit of the loyal and the disloyal, 178. For the space of nearly two months after the disaster at Ball's Bluff, the public ear was daily teased with the unsatisfactory report, All is quiet on the Potomac! The roads leading toward the Confederate camps, near Bull's Run, were never in better condition. The weather was perfect in serenity. The entire autumn in Virginia was unusually magnificent in all its features. Much of the time, until near Christmas,. the atmosphere was very much like that of the soft Indian summer time. Regiment after regiment was rapidly swelling the ranks of the Army of the Potomac to the number of two hundred thousand men, thoroughly equipped and fairly disciplined; while at no time did any reliable report make that of the Confederates in front of it over sixty thousand. Plain people wondered why so few, whom politicians called ragamuffins and a mob, could so tightly hold the National Capital in a state of siege
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
een lying in comparatively quiet camps around the National Capital. The battles of Ball's Bluff and Drainsville, already mentioned, had kept it from rusting into absolute immobility; and the troops were made hopeful at times by promises of an immediate advance upon the Confederates at Manassas. But at the beginning of the year 1862, when that army numbered full two hundred thousand men, the prospect of an advance seemed more remote than ever, for the fine weather that had prevailed up to Christmas was succeeded by storms and frost, and the roads in many places soon became almost impassable. Very little preparation had been made for winter quarters, and much suffering and discontent was the consequence. Various efforts were made by many officers to break the monotony of the camp and keep the soldiers cheerful. With this view, the musical Hutchinson family were permitted, by Secretary Cameron, to visit the camps and sing their simple and stirring songs. They were diffusing sunsh
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...