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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 106 BC or search for 106 BC in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ce of Asia in B. C. 121, the year in which C. Gracchus lost his life. He was prosecuted after his return from his province for the offence of Repetundae, in B. C. 120, by T. Albucius, probably on mere personal grounds; but he was acquitted (Cic. de Fin. 1.3, Brulus, 26, 35, de Or. 1.17, 2.70). Scaevola was consul B. C. 117, with L. Caecilius Metellus. It appears from the Laelius of Cicero (100.1), that he lived at least to the tribunate of P. Sulpicius Rufus, B. C. 88. Cicero, who was born B. C. 106, informs us, that after he had put on the toga virilis, his father took him to Scaevola, who was then an old man, and that lie kept as close to him as he could, in order to profit by his remarks (Lael. 100.1). It does not appear how long the Augur survived B. C. 88, the year in which the quarrel of Marius and Sulla began. After his death Cicero became a hearer of Q. Mucius Scaevola, the pontifex. The Augur was distinguished for his knowledge of the law, and his activity was continued to th
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Scae'vola, Mu'cius 7. Q. Mucius Scaevola, was the son of Publius, consul, B. C. 133, and pontifex maximus (Cic. Off. 1.32, 3.15), and an example whom Cicero quotes, of a son who aimed at excellence in that which had given his fattier distinction. He was tribunus plebis in B. C. 106, the year in which Cicero was born, aedilis curulis in B. C. 104, and consul in B. C. 95, with L. Licinius Crassus, the orator, as his colleague. In their consulate was enacted the Lex Mucia Licinia de Civitate (Cic. Off. 3.11), a measure which appears to have contributed to bring on the Marsic or Social War. After his consulship Scaevola was the governor (proconsul) of the province Asia, in which capacity he gained the esteem of the people who were under his government; and, to show their gratitude, the Greeks of Asia instituted a festival day (dies Mucia) to commemorate the virtues of their governor (comp. Valer. Max. 8.15). Subsequently he was made pontifex maximus, by which title he is often distinguis
Serra'nus 8. C. Atilius Serranus, eonsul B. C. 106 with Q. Servilius Caepio, the year in which Cicero and Pompey were born. Although a "stultissimus homo," according to Cicero, he was elected in preference to Q. Catulus (Obsequ. 101; Gel. 15.28 ; Veil. Pat. 2.53; Cic. pro Planc. 5). He was one of the senators who took up arms against Saturninus in B. C. 100. (Cic. pro C. Rabir. 7.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ser. Sulpi'cius Lemo'nia Rufus the son of Quintus, was a contemporary and friend of Cicero, and of about the same age ( Cic. Brut. 40) : Cicero was born B. C. 106. The name Lemonia is the ablative case, and indicates the tribe to which Servius belonged. (Cic. Philipp. 9.7.) According to Cicero, the father of Servius was of the equestrian order. (Cic. pro Mur. 7.) Servius first devoted himself to oratory, and he studied his art with Cicero in his youth, and also at Rhodus B. C. 78, for he accompanied Cicero there (Brut. 41). It is said that he was induced to study law by a reproof of Q. Mucius Scaevola, the pontifex, whose opinion Servius had asked on a legal question, and as the pontifex saw that Servius did not understand his answer, he said that " it was disgraceful for a patrician and a noble, and one who pleaded causes, to be ignorant of the law with which he had to be engaged." (Dig. 1. tit. 2. s. 2.43.) Henceforth jurisprudence became his study, in which he surpassed his teache
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
of so many desperate men. Probably many of these gladiators were prisoners. (A. D. 105.) About this time Arabia Petraea was subjected to the empire by A. Cornelius Palma, the governor of Syria; and an Indian embassy came to Rome. Trajan constructed a road across the Pomptine marshes, and built magnificent bridges across the streams. Buildings, probably mansiones, were constructed by the side of this road. He also called in all the old money, and issued a new coinage. In the autumn of B. C. 106 Trajan left Rome to make war on the Armenians and the Parthians. The pretext for the war was that Exedares, the king of Armenia, had received the diadem from the Parthian king, and he ought to have received it from the Roman emperor, as Tiridates had received it from Nero. When Chosroes, the Parthian king, knew that Trajan was seriously bent on war, he sent ambassadors, who found Trajan at Athens, and, in the name of Chosroes, offered him presents, and informed him that Chosroes had depose
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