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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 48 BC or search for 48 BC in all documents.

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s seem to have been rather those of an officer than of a commander; he was more fitted to execute the orders of another than to devise a plan of action for himself. In a few weeks' time we find Cicero speaking of him in very altered language, and expressing a desire for the arrival of Afranius and Petreius, as little was to be expected from Labienus. (In Labieno parum est dignitatis, Cic. Att. 8.2.3; comp. Cic. Att. 7.11, 12, 13, a, b. 15, 16, ad Fam. 14.14, 16.12.) In the following year (B. C. 48) Labienus took an active part as one of Pompey's legates in the campaign in Greece. Here he distinguished himself, like many others of Pompey's officers, by his cruelty and overweening confidence; though we ought perhaps to make some deduction from the unfavourable terms in which he is spoken of by Caesar. Appian, however, relates (B. C. 2.62), that it was through the advice of Labienus that Pompey did not follow up the success which he had gained at Dyrrhachium, by forcing Caesar's camp, w
strate remaining in Italy. Caesar accordingly, when he set out for Spain, to carry on the war against Afranius and Petreius, left Lepidus nominally in charge of the city, though he really depended upon Antony for the preservation of peace in Italy. During Caesars absence in Spain, Lepidus presided at the comitia, in which the former was appointed dictator, who was thus able to hold the consular comitia, which it would have been impossible for a praetor to have done. In the following year, B. C. 48, Lepidus received the province of Nearer Spain, with the title of proconsul, and here displayed both the vanity and avarice which marked his character. Having compelled the proconsul Q. Cassius Longinus, in Forther Spain, and his quaestor M. Marcellus, who were making war upon one another, to lay down their arms, he assumed the title of imperator, though he had not struck a blow. On his return to Rome B. C. 47, Caesar gratified his vanity with a triumph, though the only trophies he could d
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
But the breaking out of the civil war, almost immediately afterwards, saved him from the accusation which he dreaded. In B. C. 49 Cassius was tribune of the plebs. He was a supporter of the aristocratical party, and, with the rest of the leaders of that party, left Rome in the month of January. He crossed over to Greece with Pompey in the month of March, and subsequently received the command of the Syrian, Phoenician, and Cilician ships. With these he went to Sicily in the following year, B. C. 48, where he burnt off Messana thirty-five ships, commanded by the Caesarian, M. Pomponius, and subsequently five ships belonging to the squadron of Sulpicius and Libo. After that he made many descents upon the coasts of Sicily and Italy, till the news of the battle of Pharsalia obliged him to put a stop to his devastations. Cassius sailed to the Hellespont, with the hope of inducing Pharnaces to join him against Caesar; but in that sea he accidentally fell in with Caesar, and although he ha
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
onginus, brother of No. 1, assisted M. Laterensis in accusing Cn. Plancius, in B. C. 54 [LATERENSIS], and the speech which he delivered on that occasion is replied to by Cicero at considerable length. (Cic. pro Planc. 24, &c.) He is again mentioned in B. C. 52 as the accuser of M. Saufeius. (Ascon. in Mil. p. 54, ed. Orelli.) On the breaking out of the civil war he joined the party of Caesar, while his brother espoused that of Pompey. He is mentioned as one of Caesar's legates in Greece in B. C. 48, and was sent by him into Thessaly, in order to keep a watch upon the movements of Metellus Scipio. Before the battle of Pharsalia he was despatched by Caesar with Fufius Calenus into Southern Greece [CALENUS.] Some ancient writers (Suet. Jul. 63; D. C. 42.6) confound him with his brother, and erroneously state that it was Lucius, and not Caius, who fell in with Caesar in the Hellespont after the battle of Pharsalia. [See above, p. 800b.] In B. C. 44 L. Cassius was tribune of the plebs, b
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
the inhabitants, on account of his former exactions, and anxious to accumulate still further treasures, he was obliged to rely entirely upon the support of his soldiers, whose favour he courted by presents and indulgencies of every kind. Meantime, he received orders from Caesar to pass over to Africa, in order to prosecute the war against Juba, king of Numidia, who had espoused the side of Pompey; orders which delighted him much, as Africa afforded a fine field for plunder. Accordingly, in B. C. 48, he collected his army at Corduba; but while he was thus employed, a conspiracy broke out which had been formed against him by the provincials, and in which many of his troops joined. He was openly attacked in the market-place of Corduba, and received many wounds: the conspirators, thinking that he was killed, chose L. Laterensis as his successor. [LATERENSIS, No. 2.] Cassius, however, escaped with his life, succeeded in putting down the insurrection, and executed Laterensis and all the oth
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Longi'nus, Ca'ssius 16. Q. CASSIUS (LONGINUS) is mentioned without any cognomen; but as he is said to have been a legate of Q. Cassius Longinus [No. 15] in Spain in B. C. 48, he was probably a son of the latter. He seems to be the same as the Q. Cassius to whom Antony gave Spain in B. C. 44. (Hirt. B. Alex. 52, 57; Cic. Philipp. 3.10.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
the actual breaking out of the war; but neither do we learn that he attempted to check the intemperate zeal of his colleague, and the other leaders of the war party. He appears indeed, so far as we can judge, to have been a man of small abilities, who was put forward as a tool by the more violent partisans of Pompey. On the breaking out of the war he accompanied his colleague, Lentulus, in his hasty flight from Rome, took part in the subsequent proceedings at Capua, and eventually crossed over to Dyrrhachium with a part of the army of Pompey. In the following year (B. C. 48) we find him mentioned as commanding a part of Pompey's fleet (Caes. Civ. 3.5); but this is the last we hear of him, and it therefore seems probable, as suggested by Drumann, that he perished in the civil war. (D. C. 41.1-3; Caes. Civ. 1.1-5, 14, 25; Appian, App. BC 2.33, 37-39; Plut. Caes. 35, Pomp. 62; Cic. Att. 7.18, 20, 21, 9.1.) Cicero certainly alludes to him some years afterwards as then dead. (Phil. 13.14.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Marcellus Clau'dius 23. (P.) CORNELIUS LENTUTLUS MARCELLINUS (probably a son of the preceding), was quaestor in the army of Caesar in B. C. 48, and commanded the part of his intrenchments near Dyrrhachium, which was attacked by Pompey. Marcellinus was defeated with heavy loss, and saved only by the timely arrival of M. Antony to his support. (Caes. Civ. 3.62-65; Oros. 6.15.) The praenomen of this Marcellinus is unknown: it has been supposed that he was the father of the following, who is called P. F., but of this there is no proof.
Menede'mus 3. Chief of that part of Macedonia which bore the name of Libera. He took part with Caesar in the civil war B. C. 48. (Caes. Civ. 3.34.) He is probably the same with the Menedemus mentioned by Cicero with considerable aversion as a friend of Caesar (Philipp. 13.16, ad Att. 15.2, 4.) [C.P.M]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Metellus Scipio (search)
f the province to collect them; and there was scarcely a village which escaped their marauding visits: they plundered on their own account as well as on account of their general; and they had the fullest licence given them for every kind of oppression. After collecting large sums of money and a considerable body of troops, he took up his winter-quarters at Pergamum, leaving his province quite unprotected and exposed to a fresh attack of the Parthians. At the beginning of the following year, B. C. 48, he was preparing to plunder the temple of Diana in Ephesus, when he received a summons from Pompey to join him with his troops, as Caesar had already crossed over to Greece. Caesar sent Domitius Calvinus into Macedonia, and L. Cassius Longinus into Thessaly to oppose Scipio, but no battle took place between them, according to the statement of Caesar (Caes. Civ. 3.36-38), although a different account is given by other writers. (D. C. 41.51; Appian, App. BC 2.60.) At all events Scipio was un
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