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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 48 BC or search for 48 BC in all documents.

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Postu'mius 8. POSTUMIUS, a legate of Caesar, whom he sent over from Greece to Italy in B. C. 48, to hasten the passage of his troops. (Appian, App. BC 2.58.)
Pothi'nus an eunuch, the guardian of the young king Ptolemy, and the regent of the kingdom, recommended the assassination of Pompey, when the latter fled for refuge to Egypt after the loss of the battle of Pharsalia in B. C. 48 (Lucan, 8.484, &c.). He plotted against Caesar when he came to Alexandria, later the same year. It was Pothinus who placed Achillas over the Egyptian forces, with directions to seize a favourable opportunity for attacking Caesar, but he himself remained with the young king in the quarters of Caesar. But as he was here detected in carrying on a treasonable correspondence with Achillas, he was put to death by order of Caesar. (Caes. Civ. 3.108, 112; D. C. 42.36, 39; Plut. Cues. 48, 49; Lucan, 10.333, &100.515, &c.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
his writings. We know neither the precise place nor date of his birth. He tells us that he was a native of Umbria, where it borders on Etruria, but nowhere mentions the exact spot. Conjecture has assigned it, among other towns, to Mevania, Ameria, Hispellum, and Asisium; of which one of the two last seems entitled to the preference. The date of his birth has been variously placed between the years of Rome 697 and 708 (B. C. 57 to 46). Lachmann, however, was the first who placed it so low as B. C. 48 or 47; and the latest date (B. C. 46) is that of Hertzberg, the recent German editor. The latter's computation proceeds on very strained inferences, which we have not space to discuss; but it may possibly be sufficient to state that one of his results is to place the tenth elegy of the second book, in which Propertius talks about his extreme aetas (5.6) in B. C. 25, when, according to Hertzberg, he was one-and-twenty! For several reasons, too long to be here adduced, it might be shown that
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ell into the hands of an eunuch named Pothinus. It was not long before dissensions broke out between the latter and Cleopatra, which ended in the expulsion of the princess, after she had reigned in conjunction with her brother about three years, B. C. 48. Hereupon she took refuge in Syria, and assembled an army with which she invaded Egypt. The young king, accompanied by his guardians, met her at Pelusium, and it was while the two armies were here encamped opposite to one another, that Pompey lalexandria, landed near the mouth of the Nile, attacked and defeated the forces of the young king, and followed up his advantage by storming his camp. Ptolemy himself endeavoured to escape by the river, but was drowned in the attempt. His death occurred either before the close of B. C. 48, or early in the following year. (Caes. Civ. 3.106-112 ; Hirt. B. Alex. 1-31; D. C. 42.7-9, 34-43 ; Plut. Caes. 48, 49; Liv. Epit. cxii.; Appian, App. BC 2.89, 90; Porphyr. apud Euseb. Arm. p. 118.) [E.H.B]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Quadra'tus, C. Voluse'nus a tribune of the soldiers in Caesar's army in Gaul, is described as "vir et consilii magni et virtutis." He held the rank of Praefectus equitum under his old commander in the campaign against Pompey in Greece, in B. C. 48. (Caes. Gal. 3.5, 8.23, B. C. 3.60.) He was tribune of the plebs, B. C. 43, and one of the supporters of Antony. (Cic. Phil. 14.7.21, where the correct reading is idem Ventidium, cum alii praelore m, tribunnu Volusenumn, ego semper hostem.
L. Raci'lius tribune of the plebs, B. C. 56, was a warm friend of Cicero and of Lentulus Spinther. Cicero had returned from exile in the preceding year, and Racilius had then distinguished himself by his exertions to obtain the recall of the orator. In his tribuneship he attacked Clodius in the senate, with the utmost severity; and he allowed Cicero to publish, under his name, an edict against his great enemy. This document, which is cited by an ancient scholiast under the name of Edictum L. Racilii Tribuni Plebi, is now lost (Cic. pro Planc. 32, ad Q. Fr. 2.1.2, 2.6.5, ad Fam. 1.7.2; Schol. Bob. pro Planc. p. 268, ed. Orelli). In the civil war Racilius espoused Caesar's party, and was with his army in Spain in B. C. 48. There he entered into the conspiracy formed against the life of Q. Cassius Longinus, the governor of that province, and was put to death with the other conspirators, by Longinus. [LONGINUS, No. 15.] (Hirt. B. Alex. 52, 55.)
or comprised both races, is uncertain. But it occupied both the mountain ridge that skirts the Propontis and the southern plains which He between the base of Mount Rhodope and the sea (comp. Appian, App. BC 4.87, 105; Tac. Ann. 2.64; Plin. Nat. 4.11 (18)). We can only thus explain the seeming inconsistency in Appian's account of these chieftains ; for he describes their territory as a lofty, cold, and woody region, and yet assigns to them a powerful body of cavalry. In the civil war, B. C. 49-48, Rhascuporis joined Cn. Pompey, with 200 horse, at Dyrrachium; and in the war that followed Caesar's death, he aided Cassius with 3000, while his brother Rhascus, at the head of an equal number of cavalry, embraced the cause of the triumvirs. According to Appian this was a politic and provident device for mutual security; and it was agreed beforehand that the brother whose party was triumphant, should obtain the pardon of the brother whose party was vanquished. And so, after the victory at Phi
Rufus, A'tius one of the officers in Pompey's army in Greece, in B. C. 48, accused Afranius of treachery on account of his defeat in Spain in the preceding year. (Caes. Civ. 3.83.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
m into Liguria to suppress an insurrection at Intemelium (ad Fam. 8.15); and in April he accompanied Caesar in his campaign in Spain (ad Fam. 8.16.4,17.1). It is supposed by some modern writers that he also served under Curio in Africa in the course of the same year, as we read of a M. Rufus who was the quaestor of Curio in Africa (Caes. Civ. 2.43); but this M. Rufus must in all probability have been a different person. He was rewarded for his services by the praetorship, which he held in B. C. 48. But various causes had already alienated the mind of Caelius from his new patron, and these at length led him to engage in desperate enterprises which ended in his ruin and death. He was mortified that Caesar had entrusted the honourable duties of the city praetorship to C. Trebonius rather than to himself, a distinction, however, to which Trebonius had much greater claims, as he had in his tribuneship in B. C. 55 proposed the law for prolonging the proconsular government of Caesar. But hi
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Rufus, Minu'cius 8. Minucius Rufus, espoused the side of Pompey in the civil war, and commanded, along with Lucretius Vespillo, a squadron of eighteen ships, at Oricum, in B. C. 48 (Caes. Civ. 3.7; Appian, App. BC 2.54). He is probably the same as the Minucius who was at Tarentum in B. C. 49, and of whom Cicero speaks (ad Att. 11.14, 15, ad Q. Fr. 3.1.6). He may also be the same as the Minucius who was praetor in B. C. 43, and was one of the victims of the proscription in that year. (Appian, App. BC 4.17.)
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