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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 8 8 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 18, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 1 1 Browse Search
Boethius, Consolatio Philosophiae 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Fragments of Book 10, Chapter 14 (search)
CambysesKing of Persia, 529-522 B.C. was by nature half-mad and his powers of reasoning perverted, and the greatness of his kingdom rendered him much the more cruel and arrogant. Cambyses the Persian, after he had taken Memphis and Pelusium,525 B.C. since he could not bear his good fortune as men should, dug up the tomb of Amasis, the former king of Egypt. And finding his mummified corpse in the coffin, he outraged the body of the dead man, and after showing every despite to the senseless corpse, he finally ordered it to be burned. For since it was not the practice of the natives to consign the bodies of their dead to fire, he supposed that in this fashion also he would be giving offence to him who had been long dead. When Cambyses was on the point of setting out upon his campaign against Ethiopia, he dispatched a part of his army against the inhabitants of Ammonium,The site of the oracle of Ammon, the present oasis of Siwah. giving or
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 3, chapter 1 (search)
Cyrus' son Cambyses was leading an army of his subjects, Ionian and Aeolian Greeks among them,The received date is 525 B.C. against this Amasis for the following reason. Cambyses had sent a herald to Egypt asking Amasis for his daughter; he asked on the advice of an Egyptian, who advised it out of resentment against Amasis, that out of all the Egyptian physicians Amasis had dragged him away from his wife and children and sent him up to Persia when Cyrus sent to Amasis asking for the best eye-doctor in Egypt. Out of resentment, the Egyptian by his advice induced Cambyses to ask Amasis for his daughter, so that Amasis would either be wretched if he gave her, or hated by Cambyses if he did not. Amasis, intimidated by the power of Persia and frightened, could neither give his daughter nor refuse her; for he knew well that Cambyses was not going to take her as his wife but as his concubine. After considering the matter, he did as follows. There was a daughter of the former king Apries, al
Boethius, Consolatio Philosophiae, Book One, Prosa 4: (search)
may have been the pretext of a charge of black magic (two senators had been tried and executed on a similar charge in 510, while B. was serving as consul). me conscientiam polluisse: accusative/infinitive after mentiti sunt . insita: "innate" (< insero ), nominative singular feminine, agreeing with tu . e(/pou qeow=| : "follow God," a common philosophic slogan, here attributed to Pythagoras (fl. c. 525 B.C.). conveniebat: "was it appropriate" with accusative/infinitive. vilissimorum . . . spirituum: i.e., demons, believed by Christian antiquity to be the agents of magic and witchcraft. quem: antecedent is me. ut . . . faceres: purpose clause. penetral: "inner chamber, sanctuary"; nominative singular neuter. socer: "father-in-law," i.e., Symmachus, consul in 485, a learned Roman grandee, not often i
Ae'schylus (*Ai)sxu/los) was born at Eleusis in Attica in B. C. 525, so that he was thirty-five years of age at the time of the battle of Marathon, and contemporary with Simonides and Pindar. His father Euphorion was probably connected with the worship of Demeter, from which Aeschylus may naturally be supposed to have received his first religious impressions. He was himself, according to some authorities, initiated in the mysteries, with reference to which, and to his birthplace Eleusis, Aristophanes (Aristoph. Frogs 884) makes him pray to the Elensinian goddess. Pausanias (1.21.2) relates an anecdote of him, which, if true, shews that he was struck in very early youth with the exhibitions of the drama. According to this story, " When he was a boy he was set to watch grapes in the country, and there fell asleep. In his slumbers Dionysus appeared to him, and ordered him to apply himself to tragedy. At daybreak he made the attempt, and succeeded very easily." Such a dream as this could
building them temples. During the reign of Amasis agriculture, commerce, and the arts flourished greatly. The extension of Egyptian commerce was much favoured by the conquest of Cyprus, which he made tributary. His reign was one of almost uninterrupted peace and prosperity, which gave him leisure for adorning Egypt with several magnificent buildings and works of art. (2.175, 176.) The plans of conquest which Cyrus had been unable to carry into effect, were followed out by Cambyses, who in B. C. 525 led an army against Egypt. According to the story told by Herodotus (3.1), Cambyses had been incensed by a deception practised upon him by Amasis, who, pretending to comply with a demand of the Persian king, that he should send him his daughter to adorn his harem, substituted the daughter of Apries for his own. Amasis however did not live to see the fall of his country. He died before Cambyses reached the borders, after a reign of 44 years, and was buried at Sais in the tomb which he had c
Archias (*)Arxi/as). 1. A Spartan, who fell bravely in the Lacedaemonian attack upon Samos in B. C. 525. Herodotus saw at Pitana in Laconia his grandson Archias. (Hdt. 3.55
o about 514 B. C. In the early part of his reign he was driven from Cyrene in an attempt to recover the ancient royal privileges, and, taking refuge in Samos, returned with a number of auxiliaries, whom he had attached to his cause by the promise of a new division of lands. With their aid he regained the throne; on which, besides taking the most cruel vengeance on his enemies, he endeavoured further to strengthen himself by making submission to Cambyses, and stipulating to pay him tribute, B. C. 525. (Hdt. 4.162-165, comp. 3.13, 91, 2.181.) Terrified, however, according to Herodotus (4.164), at the discovery that he had subjected himself to the woe denounced against him, under certain conditions, by an obscure oracle (comp. 4.163), or, more probably, being driven out by his subjects, who were exasperated at his submission to the Persians (see 4.165, ad fin.), he fled to Alazir, king of Barca, whose daughter he had married, and was there slain, together with his father-in-law, by the B
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Arcesilaus III. (search)
o about 514 B. C. In the early part of his reign he was driven from Cyrene in an attempt to recover the ancient royal privileges, and, taking refuge in Samos, returned with a number of auxiliaries, whom he had attached to his cause by the promise of a new division of lands. With their aid he regained the throne; on which, besides taking the most cruel vengeance on his enemies, he endeavoured further to strengthen himself by making submission to Cambyses, and stipulating to pay him tribute, B. C. 525. (Hdt. 4.162-165, comp. 3.13, 91, 2.181.) Terrified, however, according to Herodotus (4.164), at the discovery that he had subjected himself to the woe denounced against him, under certain conditions, by an obscure oracle (comp. 4.163), or, more probably, being driven out by his subjects, who were exasperated at his submission to the Persians (see 4.165, ad fin.), he fled to Alazir, king of Barca, whose daughter he had married, and was there slain, together with his father-in-law, by the B
ing to Herodotus, who sets aside as a fiction the Egyptian story of his having had Nitetis, the daughter of Apries, for his mother. This same Nitetis appears in another version of the tale, which is not very consistent with chronology, as the concubine of Cambyses; and it is said that the detection of the fraud of Amasis in substituting her for his own daughter, whom Cambyses had demanded for his seraglio, was the cause of the invasion of Egypt by the latter in the fifth year of his reign, B. C. 525. There is, however, no occasion to look for any other motive than the same ambition which would have led Cyrus to the enterprise, had his life been spared, besides that Egypt, having been conquered by Nebuchadnezzar, seems to have formed a portion of the Babylonian empire. (See Jerem. xliii. xlvi.; Ezek. xxix.--xxxii.; Newton, On the Prophecies, vol. i. p. 357, &c.; comp. Hdt. 1.77.) In his invasion of the country, Cambyses is said by Herodotus to have been aided by Phanes, a Greek of Hali
Ly'gdamis 2. Of Naxos, was a distinguished leader of the popular party of the island in their struggle with the oligarchy. He conquered the latter, and obtained thereby the chief power in the state. With the means thus at his disposal, he assisted Peisistratus in his third return to Athens; but during his absence his enemies seem to have got the upper hand again; for Peisistratus afterwards subdued the island, and made Lygdamis tyrant of it, about B. C. 540. He also committed to the care of Lygdamis those Athenians whom he had taken as hostages. Lygdamis is mentioned again in B. C. 532 as assisting Polycrates in obtaining the tyranny of Samos. He was one of the tyrants whom the Lacedaemonians put down, perhaps in their expedition against Polycrates, B. C. 525. (Aristot. Pol. 5.5; Athen. 8.348; Hdt. 1.61, 64; Polyaen. 1.23.2; Plut. Apophth. Lac. 64.)
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