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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 39 39 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 12 12 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 5 5 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
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Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Cicero's Public Life and Contemporary Politics. (search)
r completed the separation of Pompey from Caesar. Several circumstances which occurred during the previous two years had paved the way for this result. First of all the death of Julia, Caesar's daughter and Pompey's wife, in 54 B.C., Liv. Epit. 106; Dio Cass. 39.64. and the subsequent refusal of Pompey to enter into another family alliance with Caesar, severed a link which had bound the two men together; but a still more important factor was the defeat and death of Crassus in the East in 53 B.C.Liv. Epit. 106. The indefinite continuance of a triumvirate was possible, but the existence of a duumvirate was impossible, and the time seemed to Pompey ripe for strengthening himself and humbling his rival. He was practically dictator in Rome, and still retained his governorship of Spain, while his rival, Caesar, was far away in Gaul, engaged with Vercingetorix, his bravest and ablest enemy, in a life and death struggle,Caes. B. G. 7.63-89. which might end with him as the Parthian campa
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XXVI: ad familiares 7.18 (search)
Letter XXVI: ad familiares 7.18 A villa near Ulubrae, April 8, 53 B.C. sic habeto: like scito (cf.Intr. 89), a lively colloquial expression which is used frequently in the Letters. Sic takes the place of an object Cf. Fam. 1.7.4; 16.4.4; Ep. LXI. 2. The construction is indicated in Fam. 2.6.5 unum hoc sic habeto, etc. Habere with the force of scire or audivisse, though found most frequently in the imperative, is not confined to that mode. Cf. habes omnia, Att. 5.20.7; habes consilia nostra, nunc cognosce de Bruto, Att. 5.21.10. Cf. the English colloquial expression, 'you have it,' i.e. you have the idea. maiori curae: cf. Ep. XXV.2n. vestrae cautiones chirographi mei: the guaranty-bonds drawn up by you lawyers for your clients are so poor that I am afraid your position will not be a stable one if you depend upon your own support. This letter, therefore, is a guaranty, with a Greek coloring to it, to be sure, of my support. Graeculam is very obscure, but in the diminutive force the
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XXVII: ad familiares 16.16 (search)
Letter XXVII: ad familiares 16.16 Transalpine Gaul, May, 53 B.C. mi Marce: cf. mi Pomponi, Ep. X. n. meam: (not tuam) to indicate his affection for Tullia. Tulliolam: cf. pulchellus, Ep. V.10n. and Intr. 76. amicum maluisti: with reference to Tiro's manumission. Cicero seems to refer to the same event in nostra fient, Fam. 16.10.2, and dies promissorum adest, quem etiam repraesentabo, si adveneris, Fam. 16.14.2. mihi crede: this phrase and crede mihi are common in the correspondence. The latter seems to be the colloquial, and mihi crede the more formal order. exsilui gaudio: in harmony with the familiar tone of the letter. Stati: cf. Ep. VII.1n. sic nuntiasti: for the absolute use of nuntio, cf. Ter. Hec. 642, bene, ita me di ament, nuntias. Sabini: unknown.
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XXVIII: ad familiares 7.15 (search)
Letter XXVIII: ad familiares 7.15 Rome, June, 53 B.C. quam sint morosi qui amant: Böckel considers this a quotation from some poet, and compares for the sentiment Plaut. Trin. 668: Itast amor, ballista ut iacitur, nil sic celerest neque volat: Atque is mores hominum moros et morosos efficit. C. Mati: cf. Ep. XCI., introd. note, and XCII. suavissimi: Ep. XCII. affords excellent proof of the correctness of this characterization. doctissimi: Matius not only wrote a book upon gastronomy, but Cicero found the impulse to some of his best philosophical work in the lively sympathy of Matius. Cf. filosofou/mena, Ep. XCI.5n. familiaritatem: the friendship formed between Matius and Trebatius in Gaul continued unshaken through all the vicissitudes of the Civil War. Cf. Ep. XCI. I, Att. 9.15A . mihi crede: cf. Ep. XXVII.1n.
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XXXIV: ad familiares 15.4 (search)
y lot, and Cisalpine Gaul to C. Antonius. To secure the support of Antonius, Cicero exchanged provinces with him, and afterward declined Cisalpine Gaul. For another statement of his feelings with reference to a province, cf. contra voluntatem, Ep. XXIX.1n. sacerdotium: the augurate. But Cicero writes to Atticus, 59 B.C. : de istis rebus exspecto tuas litteras cuinam auguratus deferatar, quo quidem uno ego ab istis capi possum, Att. 2.5.2. He was elected a member of the college of augurs in 53 B.C. iniuriam : one of Cicero's euphemisms for exsilium. meam calamitatem: sc. his exile. eum honorem qui solet: the nearest approach to a definite statement of his wish for a supplicatio. Such a statement he purposely avoids. paulo ante: in 11. hoc nescio quid: a phrase of modesty; cf. 13. mores, instituta, atque vitam: when in Cicero three or more substantives follow one another, no connective is used, or a connective is used with each pair of substantives, or the members of the last pair o
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LXV: ad familiares 6.6 (search)
rom some tragic poet. Cf. Ribbeck, Trag. Röm. Frag. p. 256. non involatu nec oscinis: birds were divided into two classes, alites (or praepetes) and oscines; the latter gave omens by singing, the former by their flight and the motion of their wings; cf. Serv. on Verg. Aen. 3.361. In taking the auspices, the augur faced south, and the east, from which favorable omens came, would be to his left (sinistra). involatu: cf. invitatu, Ep. XXI.2n. in nostra disciplina: Cicero became an augur in 53 B.C. nec soniviis: if the sacred chickens ate the pulse so rapidly that a part of it fell to the ground, the auspices were favorable. Querelarum: Caecina's Liber Querelarum was evidently a book complimentary to Caesar, which Caecina wrote while in exile. Billerbeck surmises that it was similar to Ovid's Tristia. On Caesar's clemency, cf. Suet. Jul. 75 and Caesar's own words to Cicero (Att. 9.16.2): recte auguraris de me -- bene enim tibi cognitus sum -- nihil a me abesse longius crudelitate