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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 57 BC or search for 57 BC in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
but not by the same father, was tribune of the plebs, B. C. 63, amid proposed soon after he had entered upon the office that his brother P. Sulla and Autronius Paetus, both of whom had been condemned on account of bribery in the consular comitia of B. C. 66, should be allowed to become candidates again for the higher offices of the state, but dropt the proposal at the suggestion of his brother. In the course of his tribunate he rendered warm support to Cicero and the aristocratical party, and in particular opposed the agrarian law of Servilius Rullus. In his praetorship, B. C. 57, he joined most of the other magistrates in proposing the recall of Cicero from banishment, and incurred in consequence the hostility of P. Clodius, whose hired mob attacked his house in the course of the same year. In B. C. 54, he supported the accusation against Gabinius. (Cic. pro Sull. 22, 23; comp. D. C. 37.25; Cic. post Red. in Sen. 9, pro Mil. 14; Ascon. in Mil. p. 48, ed. Orelli; Cic. ad Q. Fr. 3.3.2.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
onsulship, of having been one of Catiline's conspirators ; and notwithstanding Cicero spoke in his behalf, Antonius was condemned. The oration which Caelius delivered against Antonius possessed considerable merit, and was read in the time of Quintilian (Quint. Inst. 4.2.123, 9.3.58). Not long afterwards he obtained the quaestorship, and was charged with having purchased the votes at his election, an accusation from which Cicero endeavoured to clear him when he defended him in B. C. 56. In B. C. 57, Caelius accused L. Sempronius Atratinus of bribery, and when the latter, who was defended by Cicero, was acquitted, he accused him again of the same crime in B. C. 56. But while the second suit was in progress, and had not yet come on for trial, Caelius himself was accused of vis by Sempronius Atratinus the younger. Caelius had for some time been living in the house of P. Clodius on the Aventine, and was one of the avowed paramours of his notorious sister Clodia Quadrantaria. He had, howev
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Rufus, Q. Nume'rius tribune of the plebs B. C. 57, opposed Cicero's return from banishment, and is said to have been bought by the enemies of the orator. Cicero says that Numerius was in ridicule called Gracchus, and that in one of the tumults of that year he was very nearly put to death by his own party, that they might bring the odium of the deed upon the friends of Cicero. (Cic. pro Sest. 33, 38; Ascon. in Pis. p. 11, ed. Orelli ; Schol. Bob. pro Sext. p. 303, ed. Orelli.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Sabi'nus, Q. Titu'rius one of Caesar's legates in Gaul, is first mentioned in Caesar's campaign against the Remi, in B. C. 57. In the following year, B. C. 56, he was sent by Caesar with three legions against the Unelli, Curiosolitae, and Lexovii (in Normandy), who were led by Viridovix. He gained a great victory over the forces of Viridovix, and all the insurgent states submitted to his authority. In B. C. 54 Q. Titurius Sabinus and L. Aurunculeius Cotta were stationed for the winter in the territory of the Eburones with a legion and five cohorts. They had not been more than fifteen days in the country before they were attacked by Ambiorix and Cativolcus. On this occasion Sabinus did not show the same resolution as Cotta, and it was owilng to his fatal resolution to trust himself to the safe conduct of Ambiorix that the Roman troops, as well as Sabinus and Cotta, were destroyed, as is related more fully in the life of Cotta. [Vol. I. p. 869. (Caes. Gal. 2.5, 3.11, 17-19, 5.24-37 ; D.
Septi'mius 6. C. Septimius, praetor B. C. 57, supported Cicero's recall from banishment. Cicero speaks of him as augur in B. C. 45. (Cic. post Red. in Sen. 9, ad Att. 12.13, 14.)
Serra'nus 10. SEX. ATILIUS SERRANUS GAVIANUS, originally belonged to the Gavia gens, but was adopted by one of the Atilii. He was quaestor in B. C. 63 in the consulship of Cicero, who treated him with distinguished favour; but in his tribunate of the plebs, B. C. 57, he notwithstanding allowed himself to be purchased by Cicero's enemies in order to prevent his recal from banishment, and in conjunction with his colleague, Q. Numerius Rufus, offered the most vigorous resistance to Cicero's friends. When the consul Lentulus proposed in the senate on the 1st of January the recal of Cicero, Serranus begged that the question might be adjourned, in order that he might have a night to consider it : this time he employed in securing for himself increase of the pay which he had already received. After Cicero's return to Rome, Serranus put his veto upon the decree of the senate restoring to Cicero the site on which his house had stood, but he found it advisable to withdraw his opposition. (Cic.
pirators, and from thence hastened to Rome at Cicero's summons, who feared fresh commotions when the new tribunes entered upon their office on the 10th of December. But when this danger passed away, Sestius followed C. Antonius into Etruria, and it was chiefly owing to him and M. Petreius that Catiline's army was defeated. On the conclusion of the war, he accompanied Antonius to Macedonia as proquaestor, and there distinguished himself, accerding to Cicero, by his upright administration. In B. C. 57, he was tribune, and took an active part in obtaining Cicero's recall from banishment. Like Milo, lie kept a band of armed retainers to oppose P. Clodius and his partizans; and he was wounded in one of the many affrays which were then of daily occurrence in the streets of Rome. Cicero, on his return to Rome in the autumn of this year, returned him thanks in the senate and also before the people for his exertions on his behalf. Still Cicero felt himself aggrieved by the way in which Sestius
Spinther an agnomen of P. Cornelius Lentulus, consul B. C. 57, and of his son. [LENTULUS, Nos. 20 and 21.]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
T. Terrasi'dius one of Caesar's officers in Gaul, was sent to the Unelli to obtain corn in B. C. 57. (Caes. Gal. 3.7.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Varus, Quinti'lius 10. Sex. Quintilius Varus, praetor B. C. 57, was in favour of Cicero's recall from banishment. (Cic. post Red. in Sen. 9.)
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