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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 37 37 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 6 6 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 4 4 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 4 4 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Sulpicia, Carmina Omnia (ed. Anne Mahoney) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White). You can also browse the collection for 62 BC or search for 62 BC in all documents.

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Appian, Sicily and the Other Islands (ed. Horace White), Fragments (search)
that he would come to receive the surrender of the island later. Metellus paid no attention to this order, but pushed on the war until the island was subdued, making the same terms with Lasthenes as he had made with Panares. B.C. 69 Metellus was awarded a triumph and the title of Creticus with more justice than Antonius, for he actually subjugated the island.Cf. Florus, iii. 7. FROM PEIRESC Y.R. 692 The patrician Clodius, surnamed Pulcher, which means B.C. 62 handsome, was in love with Cæsar's wife. He arrayed himself in woman's clothes from head to foot, being still without a beard, and gained admission to Cæsar's house as a woman in the night, at a time when the mysteries [of the Bona Dea] were celebrated, to which only women were admitted. Having lost his guide, and being detected by others by the sound of his voice, he was hustled out.This was one of the important events in Roman history, both in its consequences and as showing the rottenness o
Appian, Mithridatic Wars (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER XVII (search)
on of Hystaspes; others came from the kingdom of the Ptolemies, having been deposited by Cleopatra at the island of Cos and given by the inhabitants to Mithridates; still others had been made or collected by Mithridates himself, as he was a lover of the beautiful in furniture as well as in other things. Y.R. 692 At the end of the winter Pompey distributed rewards to the army; 1500 Attic drachmas to each soldier and in like proportion to the officers, the whole, it was said, B.C. 62 amounting to 16,000 talents. Then he marched to Ephesus, embarked for Italy, and hastened to Rome, having dismissed his soldiers at Brundusium to their homes, by which act his popularity was greatly increased among the Romans. As he approached the city he was met by successive processions, first of youths, farthest from the city, then bands of men of different ages came out as far as they severally could walk; last of all came the Senate, which was lost in wonder at his exploits, for no one ha