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. He was a member of the equestrian order, and lived upon his hereditary estate, in the neighbourhood of Arpinum, near the junction of the Fibrenus with the Liris, devoted to literary pursuits, till far advanced in life, when he removed to Rome for the purpose of educating his two boys, Marcus and Quintus, and became the proprietor of a house in the Carinae. His reputation as a man of learning procured for him the society and friendship of the most distinguished characters of the day, especially the orators M. Antonius and L. Crassus, and the jurists Q. Scaevola and C. Aculeo, the latter of whom was his brother-in-law, being married to the sister of his wife Helvia. Although naturally of a delicate constitution, by care and moderation he attained to a good old age, and died in the year B. C. 64, while his son, whose rapid rise he had had the happiness of witnessing, was canvassing for the consulship with every prospect of success. (De Leg. 2.1, de Orat. 2.1, de Off: 3.19, ad Att. 1.6.)
signing it at one time to Q. Corniticius, who was quaestor B. C. 81, and an unsuccessful candidate for the consulship in B. C. 64; at another, to Virginius, a rhetorician contemporary with Nero; and lastly, to Timolaus, son of queen Zenobia, who had 65. (See Q. Cic. de petit cons. 5.) ** Pro C. Cornelio. Two orations B. C. 65. [CORNELIUS.] Pro C. Calpurnio Pisone, B. C. 64. [PISO.] ** Oratio in Toga Candida B. C. 64. See above, p. 711b. [CATILINA.] ** Pro Q. Gallio B. C. 64. [GALLIUS.] B. C. 64. See above, p. 711b. [CATILINA.] ** Pro Q. Gallio B. C. 64. [GALLIUS.] Orationes Consulares. (Ad Att. 2.1; B. C. 63.)   1. In Senatu, 1st January. * 2. De Lege Agraria, Oratio prima, in senatu. } [Rullus.]     De Lege Agraria, Oratio secunda, ad populum.     De Lege Agraria, Oratio tertia, ad populum. ** 3. DB. C. 64. [GALLIUS.] Orationes Consulares. (Ad Att. 2.1; B. C. 63.)   1. In Senatu, 1st January. * 2. De Lege Agraria, Oratio prima, in senatu. } [Rullus.]     De Lege Agraria, Oratio secunda, ad populum.     De Lege Agraria, Oratio tertia, ad populum. ** 3. De L. Roscio Othone. [OTHO.] * 4. Pro C. Rabirio. [RABIRIUS.] ** 5. De Proscriptorum Liberis.   6. In deponenda Provincia. [CATILINA, p. 680.]   7. In Catilinam prima Oratio, 8th Nov. } [Catilina.]   8. In Catilinam secunda Oratio, 9th
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), P. Clodius Pulcher (search)
command of the fleet. He fell into the hands of the pirates, who however dismissed him without ransom, through fear of Pompey. He next went to Antiocheia, and joined the Syrians in making war on the Arabians. Here again he excited some of the soldiers to mutiny, and nearly lost his life. He now returned to Rome, and made his first appearance in civil affairs in B. C. 65 by impeaching Catiline for extortion in his government of Africa. Catiline bribed his accuser and judge, and escaped. In B. C. 64, Clodius accompanied the propraetor L. Murena to Gallia Transalpina, where he resorted to the most nefarious methods of procuring money. His avarice, or the want to which his dissipation had reduced him, led him to have recourse to similar proceedings on his return to Rome. Asconius (in Mil. p. 50, Orell.) says, that Cicero often charged him with having taken part in the conspiracy of Catiline. But, with the exception of some probably exaggerated rhetorical allusions (de Harusp. Resp. 3, pr
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
equites. P. Cornelius Sulla and P. Autronius Paetus were the consuls elect for the year B. C. 65, but both were accused by L. Aurelius Cotta and L. Manlius Torquatus of ambitus : they were convicted and their accusers were elected consuls in their stead. No sooner had they entered upon their consulship, than P. Autronius Paetus formed a plan with Catiline for murdering the consuls and most of the senators. This conspiracy however was discovered and frustrated. The year after his consulship, B. C. 64, Cotta was censor, but he and his colleague abdicated on account of the machinations of the tribunes. In 63, when Cicero had suppressed the Catilinarian conspiracy, in the debates upon which in the senate Cotta had taken a part, he proposed a supplicatio for Cicero; and he afterwards skewed the same friendship for the unfortunate orator, as he was the first to bring forward in the senate a motion for the recall of Cicero from his exile. During the civil war Cotta belonged to the party of Ca
Cu'rius 7. Q. Curius, a Roman senator, who had once held the office of quaestor, came forward in B. C. 64 as a candidate for the consulship; but he not merely lost his election, but, being a man of a bad character and a notorious gambler, he was even ejected from the senate. He was a friend of Catiline, and an accomplice in his conspiracy; but he betrayed the secret to his mistress Fulvia, through whom it became known to Cicero. Whether he perished during the suppression of the conspiracy, or survived it, is uncertain. In the latter case, he may have been the same as the Curius mentioned by Appian (App. BC 5.137), who was in Bithynia with Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus, and attempted to betray him, for which he paid with his life. *kou/rios (Cic. de Petit. Cons. 3, in Tog. Cand. p. 426, and Ascon. in Tog. Cand, p. 95, ed. Orelli; Cic. Att. 1.1; Sallust, Catil. 17, 23, 26; Appian, App. BC 2.3.) [L.S]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Fi'gulus, Ma'rcius 3. C. Marcius Figulus, C. F. C. N., consul in B. C. 64. In the debate on the sentence of Catiline's accomplices he declared for capital punishment (Cic. Att. 12.21), and approved of Cicero's measures generally (Philipp. 2.11.). In his consulship the senate abolished several illegal collegia, as prejudicial to the freedom of the comitia and to the public peace. (Ascon. in Pison. p. 7, ed. Orelli.) His tomb was of unusual costliness (Cic. de Leg. 2.25). [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
e charges that were brought against him at the time were not established by evidence; but he was of a bolder and more determined character than C. Gracchus. Cicero mentions him among the orators of the time, but states that he did not rise above mediocrity, although his orations were still extant in the time of Cicero. A daughter of his, Fulvia, was married to P. Lentulus, by whom she became the mother of Lentulus Sura. Cicero (pro Dom. 43) calls him the father-in-law of a brother of Q. Catulus, whence we may infer that he had a second daughter. A third daughter was married to L. Caesar, consul in B. C. 91; so that M. Fulvius Flaccus was the grandfather of L. Caesar, who was consul in B. C. 64. (Liv. Epit. 59, 61; Appian, App. BC 1.18, &c.; Plut. Tib. Gracch. 18, C. Gracch. 10-16 ; Veil. Pat. 2.6; Cic. Brut. 28, de Orat. 2.70, in Cat. 1.2, 12, 4.6; Schol. Gronov. ad Catil. p. 413 ; Cic. pro Dom. 38, Phil. 8.4; V. Max. 5.3.2, 6.3.1, 9.5.1; comp. Meyer, Frag. Orat. Rom. p. 219, 2d edit.)
Ga'llius 1. Q. Gallius, was a candidate for the praetorship in B. C. 64, and accused of ambitus by M. Calidius; but he was defended on that occasion by Cicero in an oration of which only a few fragments have come down to us. He appears to have been acquitted, for he was invested with the city praetorship in B. C. 63, and presided at the trial of C. Cornelius. (Cic. Brut. 80, de Petit. Cons. 5; Ascon. in Cic. in tog. cand. p. 88, in Cornel. p. 62, ed. Orelli. See the fragments of Cicero's oration for Gallius in Orelli's edition, vol. iv. part 2, p. 454, &c.; V. Max. 8.10.3.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Glo'bulus, P. Servi'lius was tribune of the plebs, B. C. 67. When one of his colleagues, C. Cornelius [C. CORNELIUS], brought forward a rotation which the senate disliked, Globulus laid his tribunitian interdict on its reading by the clerk. (Ascon. in Cic. pro Cornel. p. 57, ed. Orelli.) But he appeared as evidence in defence of Cornelius, when impeached for disregarding the interdict. (Ascon. p. 61.) Globulus was praetor of Asia Minor in B. C. 65-64, since he was the immediate predecessor of L. Flaccus (Sal. Cat. 45; Cic. pro Flacc. 3) in that province. (Cic.pro Flacc. 32; Schol. Bob. pro Flacc. pp. 233, 245, Orelli.) [W.B.D]
L. Lu'scius a centurion in the times of Sulla, notorious for his crimes and for the wealth which he acquired by them. Luscius was convicted of three murders during the Sullan proscription, B. C. 81, and condemned B. C. 64. (Ascon. in Tog. Cand. p. 92, ed. Orelli; comp. Appian, App. BC 1.101; Plut. Sull. 33; D. C. 37.10.) [W.B.D]
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