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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 69 BC or search for 69 BC in all documents.

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Indutioma'rus or INDUCIOMA'RUS. 1. A distinguished chief of the Allobroges, was the most important witness against M. Fonteius, when he was accused in B. C. 69 of maladministration in his province of Narbonnese Gaul, and defended by Cicero. (Cic. Font. 8, 12, 17.) [FONTEIUS, No. 5.]
cile this with the details of the campaigns as given by Appian and Plutarch. Appius Claudius, who had been sent by Lucullus to Tigranes, to demand the surrender of Mithridates, had returned with an unfavourable answer: intelligence had been also received that the two kings, laying aside all personal differ. ences, were assembling large forces and preparing for immediate hostilities; and Lucullus now determined to anticipate them by invading the dominions of Tigranes. It was in the spring of B. C. 69, that he set out on his march towards Armenia, with a select body of 12,000 foot and 3000 horse, leaving his lieutenant Sornatius to command in Pontus (where every thing seemed now perfectly settled) during his absence. Ariobarzanes furnished him assistance on his march through Cappadocia, and the passage of the Euphrates was facilitated by an accidental drought, which was hailed as a good omen both by the general and his soldiers. From thence lie advanced through the district of Sophene, a
was succeeded by his brother, Alexander Jannaeus 6. reigned B. C. 105-78. [ALEXANDER JANNAEUS, Vol. I. p. 117.] He was succeeded by his widow, Alexandra 7. appointed her son Hyrcanus II. to the priesthood, and held the supreme power B. C. 78-69. On her death in the latter year her son, Hyrcanus II. 8. obtained the kingdom, B. C. 69, but was supplanted almost immediately afterwards by his brother, Aristobulus II. 9. who obtained the throne B. C. 68. [ARISTOBULUS, No. 2.] For the remaXANDER JANNAEUS, Vol. I. p. 117.] He was succeeded by his widow, Alexandra 7. appointed her son Hyrcanus II. to the priesthood, and held the supreme power B. C. 78-69. On her death in the latter year her son, Hyrcanus II. 8. obtained the kingdom, B. C. 69, but was supplanted almost immediately afterwards by his brother, Aristobulus II. 9. who obtained the throne B. C. 68. [ARISTOBULUS, No. 2.] For the remainder of the history of the house of the Maccabees see HYRCANUS II. and HERODES I.
Alexandra 7. appointed her son Hyrcanus II. to the priesthood, and held the supreme power B. C. 78-69. On her death in the latter year her son,
Hyrcanus II. 8. obtained the kingdom, B. C. 69, but was supplanted almost immediately afterwards by his brother,
Magada'tes (*Magada/ths), general of Tigranes, king of Armenia, was entrusted by him with the government of Syria, when it had been conquered from Antiochus X. (Eusebes) in B. C. 83. Magadates, having ruled over the country for fourteen years, left it in B. C. 69 to aid his master against Lucullus; and Antiochus XIII., son of Antiochus X., seized the opportunity to recover the kingdom. (App. Syr. 48, 49, Mithr. 84, &c.; Plut. Luc. 25, &c.; Just. 40.1, 2.) Justin differs, apparently, from Appian in mentioning eighteen years as the period during which Syria was held by the officer of Tigranes; but the numbers are satisfactorily reconciled by Clinton. (F. H. vol. iii. p. 340.) [E.
Matri'nius 3. D. Matrinius, a writer of the aediles (scriba aedilicus) was defended by Cicero, about B. C. 69. (Cic. Clu. 45.)
Me'mmius 10. P. MEMMIUS, was cited a witness for the defendant at the trial of A. Caecina, B. C. 69. (Cic. pro Caec. 10.) [CAECINA, No. 1.]
Metellus 23. Q. Caecilius Metellus Creticus. His descent and that of his two brothers is quite uncertain; for he evidently could not have been the son of Metellus Macedonicus, as Florus (3.8.1) states. (Drumann, vol. ii. p. 50.) Metellus was consul B. C. 69 with Q. Hortensius, and obtained the conduct of the war against Crete, which Hortensius had declined, when the lot had given this province to him. Metellus left Italy in B. C. 68 with three legions. He was engaged two whole years in the subjugation of the island, and did not return to Rome till the third. The difficulty of the conquest was much increased by the unwarrantable interference of Ponpey; for after Cydonia, Cnossus, and many other towns had fallen into the hands of Metellus, and the war seemed almost at an end, the Cretans sent to offer their submission to Pompey, from whom they hoped to obtain more favourable terms than from Metellus. By the Gabinian law, passed in B. C. 67, which gave to Pompey the conduct of the war ag
Metellus 25. M. Caecilius Metellus, brother of the two preceding [Nos. 23, 24], was praetor B. C. 69, in the same year that his eldest brother was consul. The lot gave him the presidency in the court de pecuniis repetundis, and Verres was very anxious that his trial should come on before Metellus. (Cic. Verr. Act. 1.8, 9, 10.) Since he did not obtain the consulship, Drumann conjectures (vol. ii. p. 57) that the gladiators of M. Metellus, whom Cicero mentions in B. C. 60 (ad Att. 2.1.1) may have belonged to the son of the praetor, and were exhibited by him in honour of his father, who would therefore have died about this time.
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