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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 38 38 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 71 BC or search for 71 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 30 (search)
testis est, etc. the enumeration corresponds to that in sect. 28, ll. 12-14, above (Civile, Africanum, etc.). Italia, Sicilia., i.e. in the Civil War. Italia: Pompey raised an army to help Sulla against Cinna and Carbo., the Marian leaders (B.C. 83). Sicilia, Africa: after Sulla's final victory in Italy, he entrusted to young Pompey the subjugation of Sicily and Africa, where Carbo, with the remnants of his power, had taken refuge. Fig. 23 shows a coin of Pompey, on which is an allegorical head of Africa. Gallia: this refers to certain hostilities in Gaul when Pompey was on his way to Spain to the war against Sertorius (B.C. 77); these are referred to as bellum Transalpinum in sect. 28. Hispania: in the war with Sertorius (see, however, note on p. 71, l. 5). iterum: Pompey, on his way back from Spain (B.C. 71), fell in with the remnants of the troops of Spartacus and cut them to pieces in Cisalpine Gaul; but the whole passage is a rhetorical exaggeration.
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 62 (search)
into the regular form of a sententia, or formal expression of opinion in the Senate, using the simple present tense, with the qualifying mea sententia; § 467(276,b); B. 259,2; G.227,N.2; H. 530(467, iii, 6); H.-B. 484. ut . . . fieret: subst. clause of result after the analogy of the subj. with verbs of happening; § 571,c (332,f); G. 553,4; H. 571, I (501, i). ex senatus consulto: another irregularity, for the comitia were the law-making body and therefore of course had the sole power of exempting from the laws. legibus solutus, exempted from the operation of the laws, i.e. those limiting the age of magistrates (leges annales). magistratum: the legal age of a consul was not below forty-three, and that of a praetor not below forty. Pompey, however, was elected consul (B.C. 70) at the age of thirty-six, which was the regular age for the quaestorship. iterum: Pompey celebrated his second triumph Dec.31, B.C. 71, and the next day entered upon the consulship. in, in the case of
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 68 (search)
dubitare quin, hesitate. The usual construction in this sense would be with the infin.; § 558, a, N.1 (332,g, N.2); B. 298, b; G. 555, R3; 14.596, I (505, i); cf. H.-B. 502, 3, b, 586. auctoritatibus, i.e. the opinions of influential men (cf. auctor in the next line). est vobis auctor, you have as authority. P. Servilius (Vatia Isauricus) was one of the most reputable men of the time. He held the proconsulship of Cilicia, B.C. 78-75, in which he gained great successes over the pirates. It was probably his intimate knowledge of the region and the kind of warfare, that led him to support this vigorous measure. debeat: for tense, see § 435, a (287, a); Cf. B. 268, 1; H-B. 481. Curio: see note on Impeachment of Verres, sect. 18, p. 34, l. 29. Lentulus: Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus, cos. B.C. 72; not to be confounded with Lentulus Sura, ens. B.C. 71, the accomplice of Catiline. Cassius: for the character of this family, see note on Verr. 1, sect. 30, p. 39, l. 3
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 2 (search)
lic nation between the Rhone and the Alps (in the modern Dauphine and Savoy); subdued B.C. 121, and united with the province Narbonensis. They were restless under their new masters (see sect. 22), and inclined to take up with Catiline's movement. Their ambassadors had come to complain of certain exactions of their provincial governor. belli, i.e. when out of the range of the Roman jurisdiction; tumultus, rebellion, i.e. when nearer home. Lentulo, see Introd., p. 126: he had been consul B.C. 71, but had been expelled from the Senate the next year, with sixty-three others, on account of his character, and he now held the praetorship with the view of beginning the career of office over again. manifesto deprehenderetur, taken in the act: the words apply strictly to the criminals themselves. praetores: although the regular duties of the praetors were judicial, yet they possessed the imperium, and in virtue of this could command troops in the absence of the consuls, or under their