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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 38 38 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 71 BC or search for 71 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PUTEAL LIBONIS PUTEAL SCRIBONIANUM (search)
iness of looking up such spots and enclosing them in this way (Fest. 333). It was a resort of moneylenders (Pers. 4. 49, and Schol.; Cic. pro Sest. 18; Ov. Rem. 561), and near the tribunal of the praetor (Hor. Ep. i. 19. 8, and Porphyr.; Sat. ii. 6. 35), the arch of Fabius (Pers. Schol. loc. cit.) and the porticus Iulia (supra, 73). It is shown on coins (Babelon, Monnaies, Aemilia 1 ; Scribonia 8), Babelon dates them about 54 B.C.. while Grueber (BM. Rep. i. 419, 3377-3385) puts them about 71 B.C., following De Salis. For a restoration of the latter by Trajan, see Babelon, ii. p. 584, No. 47, and perhaps the round base from Veii in the Lateran Museum is an imitation of it (Benndorf und Schoene, Die antike Bildwerke d. Lateran. Museums, No. 440; HF 1210; CIL xi. 3799). Six blocks of travertine lying near the arch of Augustus, which seem to belong to a circular kerb, have been identified with this puteal, but without any good reason (Jord. i. 2. 210, 403-404; Gilb. iii. 159; HC 160; T