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Pompo'nius 8. M. Pomponius, aedile B. C. 82, in the consulship of the younger Marius. In the scenic games exhibited by him, the actress Galeria appeared, who was then a child of 12 years old, and who was again brought on the stage in A. D. 9, in her 104th year, in the votive games in honour of Augustus. (Plin. Nat. 7.49. s. 48.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Po'ntius Telesi'nus 1. A Samnite, appears to have been appointed general of the Samnite forces in the Social war after the death of Pompaedius Silo. At all events he was at the head of the Samnite army in B. C. 82, in which year Carbo and the younger Marius were consuls. Marius and the brother of Telesinus were besieged in Praeneste by Sulla. Telesinus himself, at the head of an army of 40,000 men, had marched to the neighbourhood of Praeneste, apparently with the intention of relieving the town, but in reality with another object, which he kept a profound secret. In the dead of the night he broke up from his quarters, and marched straight upon Rome, which had been left without any army for its protection. The Samnites were upon the point of avenging the many years of oppression which they had experienced from the Romans. Sulla scarcely arrived in time to save the city. Near the Colline gate the battle was fought, the most desperate and bloody of all the contests during the civil war.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Po'ntius Telesi'nus 2. A brother of the preceding, commanded the Samnite forces which had been sent to the assistance of the younger Marius, and shared in the defeat of the latter by Sulla, and with him took refuge in Praeneste, where they were besieged by the conqueror, B. C. 82. After the defeat of the Samnites and the death of the elder Telesinus, which have been related above, Marius and the younger Telesinus attempted to escape by a subterraneous passage, which led from the town into the open country ; but finding that the exit was guarded, they resolved to die by one another's hands. Telesinus fell first, and Marius accordingly put an end to his own life, or was stabbed by his slave. (Liv. Epit. 88; Vell. 2.27.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Rufus, M. Cae'lius was the son of a wealthy Roman eques of the same name, who appears to have obtained his property as a negotiator in Africa. He was accused of parsimony, especially in reference to his son, but the extravagant habits of the latter required some degree of restraint. He was alive at the trial of his son in B. C. 56 (Cic. pro Cael. 2, 15, 30, 32.) The younger Caelius was born at Puteoli on the 28th of May, B. C. 82. on the same day and the same year as the orator C. Licinius Calvus, in conjunction with whom his name frequently occurs (Plin. Nat. 7.49. s. 50; Quint. Inst. 10.1.115, 10.2.25, 12.10.11). His father was enabled to procure him introductions to M. Crassus and Cicero, who gave him the advantage of their advice in the prosecution of his studies, especially in the cultivation of oratory. During Cicero's praetorship (B. C. 66), and the two following years, Caelius was almost always at his side; but in the consulship of the great orator (B. C. 63), he became intima
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
lex curiata. They were authorised to sell all the lands out of Italy, which had become part of the public domain since the consulship of Sulla and Q. Pompeius (B. C. 88), with the exception of those which had been guaranteed by treaty to the Roman allies; and likewise all the public domains in Italy, with the exception of the Campanian and Stellatian districts, and of the lands which had been assigned by the state, or had had a possessor since the consulship of Carbo and the younger Marius (B. C. 82). The object of the latter enactment was to avert any opposition that might be made by the numerous persons who had received grants of public lands from Sulla. Further, all the proconsuls and other magistrates in the provinces, who had not yet paid into the treasury the monies which they had obtained from the booty of the enemy or in any other way, were commanded to give the whole of such monies to the decemvirs; but an exception was made in favour of Pompey, whom it was thought prudent to
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
es of their governor (comp. Valer. Max. 8.15). Subsequently he was made pontifex maximus, by which title he is often distinguished from Quintus Mucius the Augur. He lost his life in the consulship of C. Marius the younger and Cn. Papirius Carbo (B. C. 82), having been proscribed by the Marian party, from which we may conclude that he was of the faction of Sulla, or considered to be, though so upright a man could not be the blind partisan of any faction. (Vell. 2.26.) The pontifex in vain fled fo.26; Lucan, 2.126). His body was thrown into the Tiber (Appian, App. BC 1.88). The story in Valerius Maximus (9.11) of an attempt by C. Fimbria to murder Scaevola at the funeral of C. Marius (B. C. 86), does not refer to the death of Scaevola in B. C. 82, as some commentators have supposed. The facts of this attempt to assassinate Scaevola are recorded by Cicero (pro S. Rosc. Amer. 12). The assassin was C. Flavins Fimbria, who afterwards met with the fate that he deserved in Asia. (Plut. Sull. 1
tioned with L. Acilius in the town of Aesernia, from which they escaped on the approach of Vettius Scato in the dress of slaves (Appian, App. BC 1.41). He belonged to the Marian party in the civil wars, and was appointed consul in B. C. 83 with C. Norbanus. In this year Sulla returned to Italy, and advanced against the consuls. He defeated Norbanus in Italy, but seduced the troops of Scipio to desert their general, who was taken prisoner in his camp along with his son Lucius, but was dismissed by Sulla uninjured. He was, however, included in the proscription in the following year, B. C. 82, whereupon he fled to Massilia, and passed there the remainder of his life. His daughter was married to P. Sestius (Appian, App. BC 1.82, 85, 86; Plut. Sull. 28, Sertor. 6 ; Liv. Epit. 85 ; Flor. 3.21 ; Oros. 5.21; Cic. Phil. 12.11, 13.1; Cic. pro Sest. 3 ; Schol. Bob. in Sest. p. 293, ed. Orelli). Cicero speaks favourably of the oratorical powers of this Scipio (dicebat non imperite, Cic. Brut. 47).
44.) In B. C. 83 Sertorius was praetor. Sulla was now returning home after reducing Mithridates to terms, and the party of Sertorius made preparations to oppose him. But their means and measures were ineffectual against so wily an enemy. The consul Norbanus was defeated; and the army of the other consul, L. Scipio, being gained over by Sulla, though Q. Sertorius had warned Scipio of the danger of a negotiation with Sulla, he withdrew into Etruria. His remonstrances also had no effect in B. C. 82 with the consuls Carbo and the younger Marius, and in order to get rid of him, they suggested that he should undertake the administration of the province of Further Spain. Julius Exsuperantius (100.8) is the sole authority for this fact, though he does not state the whole affair correctly. Appian (App. BC 1.86, 108) makes Sertorius go to Spain in B. C. 83, before the consulship of Carbo and the younger Marius. With few men and little money, Sertorius made his way through Gaul, and bought
ng districts ; and Q. Metellus Pius, M. Crassus, M. Lucullus, and several others offered their services as legates. It was not, however, till the following year, B. C. 82, that the struggle was brought to a decisive issue. The consuls of this year were Cn. Papirius Carbo and the younger Marius; the former of whom was entrusted witcontinued still longer, and Sulla did not live to see its completion. The armies of the Marian party in Sicily and Africa were subdued by Pompey in the course of B. C. 82; but Sertorius in Spain continued to defy all the attempts of the senate to crush him, till his cowardly assassination by Perperna in B. C. 72. [SERTORIUS.] Suey relate, as Lex Cornelia de Falsis, Lex Cornelia de Sicariis, &c. These laws were all passed during the time that Sulla was dictator, that is, from the end of B. C. 82 to B. C. 79, and most of them in all probability during the years B. C. 81 and 80. It is impossible to determine in what order they were proposed, nor is it mate
Tarqui'tius 3. Q. Taiqutius, occurs only on coins, of which a specimen is annexed. The obverse represents a woman's head with c. ANNIVS, and the reverse Victory in a biga, with Q. TARQUITI. A similar coin is figured in Vol. I. p. ]80, with the name of L. Fabius on the obverse; and Eckhel supposes that Q. Tarquitius and L. Fabius were the quaestors of C. Annius, who fought in Spain against Sertorius in B. C. 82. (Eckhel, vol. v. pp. 134, 322.)
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