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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 52 52 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 4 4 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 82 BC or search for 82 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Roman Oratory. (search)
ther than to influence his mind or feelings by the effective presentation of ideas. Hortensius, the great contemporary and rival of Cicero, was a special example of the Asiatic school. He was a somewhat effeminate person, with a dandified air both in composition and delivery. "His voice," we read, "was resonant and sweet, his motions and gestures had even more art than is suitable for an orator." Brutus, xcv, 326. The extreme Attic school was represented by C. Licinius Calvus. Born May 28, B.C. 82; died before B.C. 47. "Though he handled his style with knowledge and good taste," writes Cicero, "yet being too critical of himself" and fearing to acquire unhealthy force, he lost even real vitality. Accordingly, his speaking, repressed by too great scrupulousness, was brilliant to the learned and those who listened to him attentively, but by the crowd and the Forum it was swallowed like a pill." Brutus, lxxxii, 284. It is important to settle Cicero's own position in this contest. He hims
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 37 (search)
venierunt, from veneo not venio. si enim haec, for if such remarks, etc.. i.e. if I may be allowed to speak freely. tantus homo, such a great-person: a hint that more important men than he had suffered. In fact, all the really eminent victims of the Civil War had perished before the proscription. qui (adv.), how? Valeria: the law by which Sulla was made perpetual dictator and invested with absolute power of life and death (B.C. 82); it was proposed by L. Valerius Flaccus as interrex. Laws were designated by the gentile name of their proposer ; all laws, for example, carried by L. Cornelius Sulla were known as Leges Corneliae. Cornelia: this appears to have been enacted some time after the lex Valeria, in order to regulate the details of the proscription. Cicero's ignorance of the law is no doubt affected. novi, I know the thing or person ; scio, I know the fact: I am not acquainted with the law, and do not know which it is. proscripti sunt: the indic. must mean tho
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 4 (search)
etenim,introducing the reason of nullam sibi rem, etc., above. adulescentiae,i.e. before he entered public life. quaestura,quaestorship, the first grade of political honor. Carbonem:Carbo was the leader of the Marian faction after the death of Marius and Cinna. He was consul B.C. 82, the year of Sulla's return and victory. Verres was his quaestor (or paymaster), and went over to the enemy with the money-chest when he saw which side was likely to prevail. necessitudinem religionemque:the quaestor was originally nominated specially by the consul; and the peculiarly close and sacred relation (necessitudo) existing between them was known as pietas,—a sentiment akin to filial affection. The designation by lot (sors) was also held to be a token of divine will, and therefore sacred (religio). In betraying his consul, then, Verres was guilty of more than an ordinary breach of trust,—he committed an act of impiety. legatio:Verres was in B.C. 80-79 legatus and acting quaestor (pro
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 61 (search)
lf precedent has often been violated with the full assent of Catulus. Why, then, should Catulus be so scrupulous now, when the highest interests of the state are involved?" For the several occurrences referred to, see notes on sects. 28-30, above. privatum, i.e. not a magistrate. a senatorio gradu: no one could legally enter the Senate until after holding the quaestorship, the minimum age for which was thirty at least, and regularly thirty-six, while Pompey was at the time referred to (B.C. 82) only twenty-three. in ea provincia, i.e. Africa. fuit: translate, he showed, etc. (in order to render the abls. of quality, which come in a way foreign to our idiom). victorem, victorious (pred. adj.). exercitum deportavit: this was one of the essential conditions of a triumph. equitem, i.e. not a member of the Senate, having never held a magistracy. triumphare: the honor of a triumph was restricted to commanders who possessed the imperium by virtue of holding a regular magistrac
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 4 (search)
uscan soothsayers, who interpreted the will of the gods, chiefly from the entrails of animals sacrificed. They were a private class, of low standing, and are not to be confounded with the augurs, who were a board of Roman noblemen, of high rank, who interpreted the auspices according to the native Roman rules, chiefly by the flight of birds, by lightning, etc. Cinnam, etc.: L. Cornelius Cinna was colleague of Marius, and ruled Rome after his death, B.C. 86. L. Cornelius Sulla ruled Rome B.C. 82-79 (see sect. 24). virginam: the Vestal Virgins, six in number, maidens of high rank, consecrated to chastity and the service of Vesta. They were peculiarly sacred, and were highly privileged. Violation of their vow of chastity was incestus, and was regarded as a prodigium of very bad omen. Of the incident referred to here nothing further is known. Capitoli: the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus (see "Plunder of Syracuse," sect. 15) was burned during the rule of the Marian faction, B.C. 83.