Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for May, 1 AD or search for May, 1 AD in all documents.

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From Washington. Washington, Jan. 5. --On inquiry at the proper quarter, it has been ascertained that before June last, it being found that the arms at the several arsenals were not proportionately distributed, and that the Southern arsenals were quite deficient in those supplies, a distribution was made for equalization only, and for no other object. They were principally drawn from the Springfield armory, and the arsenals at Watervilet, N. Y, and Water-town, Mass. The secession troubles, it is known, had not then commenced. After the distribution was completed, there remained a preponderance of arms at the North. Lieut Gen. Scott was engaged till 4 o'clock this morning on business connected with his department. The Republicans were again in caucus today, their object being to agree on uniform legislative action. The arrival of seventeen recruits from Philadelphia for the purpose of being drilled at the Marine Barracks at Washington, has been magnified int
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1861., [Electronic resource], Revolting Assassination in Kentucky.--three Persons murdered in cold blood. (search)
From Charleston. Charleston, Jan. 5. --The journals publish a correspondence between the South Carolina Commissioners and the President of the United States. President A. B. Longstreet, of the South Carolina College, issues a four-page pamphlet, entitled "Shall South Carolina begin the War?" He earnestly desires the nd the wrath of the United States be brought upon our devoted city. He imploringly closes by saying, "Let the first shot come from our enemies." Charleston, Jan. 5.--In Convention to-day an ordinance was introduced that all the power necessary to make postal arrangements and enact postal laws be vested in the General Assembly adoption of a national ensign is to be left to the Legislature. The Convention then adjourned until again called together by the President. Charleston, Jan. 5.--The President of the Convention to-day received a telegram from the Mayor of Charleston, saying that New Orleans sympathizes with Charleston in the perils to whi
Congressional. Washington, Jan. 5. --Senate.--Mr. Thomson (N. J) presented the resolutions passed at a public meeting in New Jersey, in favor of sustaining the Union. Laid on the table. Mr. Mason (Va) offered a resolution of inquiry, requesting the Secretary of War to give the Senate a copy of any orders issued from the Department to the officers commanding the fortifications of South Carolina, since the 1st of November; also, a copy of any plans or recommendations relative to increasing the forces or otherwise in the forts and arsenals in Virginia, or any States of the South, by the Commander-in-Chief, and if any action or orders have been issued in pursuance thereto. Laid over. Mr. Sumner (Mass.) offered a petition from Moses Gale, of Massachusetts, asking that an amendment to the Constitution be made, that it may recognize the existence of a God. Mr. Slidell's resolution to expel the reporters of the Associated Press from the Reporter's gallery, was taken
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1861., [Electronic resource], Letter from Col. F. H. Smith to a friend, on the questions of the day. (search)
The adjourned meeting of the citizens of Philadelphia on the crisis. Philadelphia, Jan. 5. --The adjourned meeting of the citizens of Philadelphia, to consider the present state of the Union, was held at the Board of Trade Rooms at noon to-day. The Committee to whom the coercion and non-coercion resolutions were referred made no report, and there being an evident determination on the part of many present who did not participate at the last meeting to force the passage of the non-coercive resolutions of Judge Lewis, which was resisted by prominent Republicans, an exciting scene of disorder occurred, during which District Attorney Mann showed a willingness to fight on the spot. On the motion of a Republican, the meeting adjourned, but another was immediately called at the same place, and Judge Lewis placed in the chair. Resolutions were then unanimously passed denouncing the Personal Liberty bill, &c., and approving the Crittenden resolutions. The Republica
Inaugural message of Gov, Andrew, of Massachusetts. Boston, Jan. 5. --Gov. Andrew was inaugurated to-day, and delivered his inaugural message to the Legislature. He submits a financial statement, showing that $377,000 are to be raised by a State tax to cover deficits in the income of previous years. The aggregate amount of taxable property in the State is $897,795,326, being an increase of about 50 per cent. in ten years. The enrolled militia in the State exceeds 155,000 men, while the active militia numbers about 5,600. The Governor suggests that a larger number be placed on an active footing, so that the State may be ready to contribute her share of force in any exigency of public danger The Governor favors the abolition of the death penalty, and a change in the statutes on marriage and divorce. The Personal Liberty law he believed to be strictly constitutional, as the right of a person to reclaim an alleged fugitive must always be subordinate to the indefeasible
Working Men's Union meeting. Cincinnati, Jan. 5. --The working men held a large Union meeting to-day, and adopted resolutions that the Union must be preserved by the enforcement of the laws in every portion of the country; that a remedy for all grievances may be had under the Constitution, and that peace and safety are only to be had by its maintenance.
Florida Convention. Tallahassee, Fla.,Jan, 5 --Judge McGhee, of Madison, was elected permanent President of the Canvention. The morning session was consumed in perfecting the organization. At the afternoon session resolutions were offered declaring the right of Florida to secede; that there is cause for the exercise of that right, and that it is the duty of the State to prepare for it. A discussion resulted on the policy of the immediate passing of these resolutions, and they were finally made the special order for Monday--to which time the Convention adjourned.
Salute of honor to Anderson at Boston — the steam-frigate Mississippi. Boston, Jan. 5. --A hundred guns were fired on the Common to-day in honor of Major Anderson. The steam-frigate Mississippi has gone out of the dry-dock thoroughly repaired. Schenectady, Jan. 5.--The 26th regiment, last evening, under Captains Bryson and Van Luben, fired a salute of thirty-three guns and thirty-three rockets in honor of Major Anderson. National airs were performed amid cheers for Major Anthe steam-frigate Mississippi. Boston, Jan. 5. --A hundred guns were fired on the Common to-day in honor of Major Anderson. The steam-frigate Mississippi has gone out of the dry-dock thoroughly repaired. Schenectady, Jan. 5.--The 26th regiment, last evening, under Captains Bryson and Van Luben, fired a salute of thirty-three guns and thirty-three rockets in honor of Major Anderson. National airs were performed amid cheers for Major Anderson and Secretaries Holt and Stanton.
Inaugural address of Gov., Washburne to the Maine Legislature--repeal of the Liberty bill, if unconstitutional Portland, Mr, Jan. 5. --Governor Washburne's Inaugural Address to the Maine Legislature, recommends conciliation and forbearance; to stand by the Constitution; and although urging the Legislature to make no compromises involving moral treason, he recommends the repeal of the Personal Liberty bill if found to be unconstitutional.
A Surmise. New York, Jan. 5. --The steamer Star of the West coaled up yesterday with unusual celerity. A report (which was ridiculed at the company's office) says she is going to Charleston with troops.
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