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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Another testimony taken out of the 60 chapter of the foresayd history of Ferdinando Columbus, concerning the offer that Bartholomew Columbus made to king Henry the seventh on the behalfe of his brother Christopher. (search)
ations granted by the king of England to his brother, understood at Paris by Charles the king of France, that the Admirall his brother had already performed that discovery: whereupon the French king gave unto the sayd Bartholomew an hundred French crownes to beare his charges into Spaine. And albeit he made great haste upon this' good newes to meet with the Admirall in Spaine, yet at his comming to Sivil his brother was already returned to the Indies with seventeene saile of shipps. Wherefore to fulfill that which he had left him in charge in the beginning of the yeere 1494 he repaired to the Catholike princes, taking with him Diego Colon my brother and me also, which were to be preferred as Pages to the most excellent Prince Don John, who now is with God, according to the commandement of the Catholike Queene Lady Isabell, which was then in Validolid. Assoone therefore as we came to the Court, the princes called for Don Bartholomew, and sent him to Hispaniola with three ships, &c.
river Senega, otherwise called Niger , and Cape Roxo & Sierra Leone, and in a few yeeres after they did discover the coast of Guinea, and there peopled and built the castle of Mina : then discovered they further to the countreys of Melegettes, Benin , and Congo , with the Ilands of Principe, da Nobon, S. Matthewe, and S. Thomas under the Equinoctiall line, which they peopled, and built in the said Island of S. Thomas the haven towne or port of Pavosan. After that, about the yeere of our Lord, 1494. one Bartholomew Dias was sent foorth, who was the first man that discovered and doubled that great and large Cape called de Bon Esperanze, & passing the currents that run upon the said coast, on the Southeast part of Africa , between the said maine land & the Island of S. Laurence, otherwise called of the ancients, Madagascar , he discovered to ye harbor named the River of ye Infant. After that since the yeere of our Lord God, 1497. and before the ful accomplishment of the yeere of Christ, 1
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The seventh Chapter sheweth that the planting there, is not a matter of such charge or difficultie, as many would make it seeme to be. (search)
river Senega, otherwise called Niger , and Cape Roxo & Sierra Leone, and in a few yeeres after they did discover the coast of Guinea, and there peopled and built the castle of Mina : then discovered they further to the countreys of Melegettes, Benin , and Congo , with the Ilands of Principe, da Nobon, S. Matthewe, and S. Thomas under the Equinoctiall line, which they peopled, and built in the said Island of S. Thomas the haven towne or port of Pavosan. After that, about the yeere of our Lord, 1494. one Bartholomew Dias was sent foorth, who was the first man that discovered and doubled that great and large Cape called de Bon Esperanze, & passing the currents that run upon the said coast, on the Southeast part of Africa , between the said maine land & the Island of S. Laurence, otherwise called of the ancients, Madagascar , he discovered to ye harbor named the River of ye Infant. After that since the yeere of our Lord God, 1497. and before the ful accomplishment of the yeere of Christ, 1
arriving at the specified point another order was received to return. Thus ended the battle of February fifteenth, 1862, so far as the brigade I commanded participated. The number killed and wounded in each regiment, as per Adjutants' reports is as follows:  men and officers.killed.wounded. Third Mississippi regiment546546 Eighth Kentucky regiment3122772 Seventh Texas regiment3052039 First Mississippi regiment3311661  149468218 Making a total of 286 killed and wounded out of 1494 officers and men. I respectfully refer you to documents for the names of the killed and wounded of the different regiments. I cannot call especial attention to one of the field officers under my command without doing injustice to others. Lieutenant-Colonel Wells, assisted by Captains Kennedy and Wells, of the Third Mississippi; Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon, assisted by Major Henry of the Eighth Kentucky; Colonel Gregg, Lieutenant-Colonel Clough, and Major Granbury of the Seventh Texas; Lieutenan
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), America, discovery of. (search)
America, discovery of. Ferdinand Columbus was an illegitimate son of the great admiral by Doña Beatrix Henriques; was born in Cordova Aug. 15, 1488; became a page to Queen Isabella in 1498; accompanied his father on the fourth voyage, in 1502-4; passed the latter part of his life principally in literary pursuits and in accumulating a large library; and died in Seville July 12, 1539. Among his writings was a biography of his father, which was published in Italian, in Venice, in 1571. The original of this work, in Spanish, together with that of his history of the Indies, is lost, although a considerable portion of his collection of volumes in print and mannscript is still preserved in the Seville Cathedral. Because of the loss of the original manuscript of the biography, its authenticity has been called into question, and has formed the basis for quite a spirited controversy by historians, with the result that the general belief in the genuineness of the biography has not been s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cartier, Jacques 1494-1555 (search)
Cartier, Jacques 1494-1555 French navigator; Jacques Cartier. born at St. Malo, France, Dec. 31, 1494; was commissioned by Francis I., King of France, to command an expedition to explore the Western Continent. On April 20, 1534, after appropriate ceremonies in the cathedral at St. Malo, he sailed from that port with two ships, having each a crew of 120 men, and, after a prosperous voyage of twenty days, they arrived at Newfoundland. Sailing northward, he entered the Strait of Belle Isle, and, touching the coast of Labrador, he formally took possession of the country in the name of his king, and erected a cross, upon which he hung the arms of France. Turning southward, he followed the west coast of Newfoundland to Cape Race. Then he explored the Bay of Chaleurs, landed in Gaspe Bay, held friendly intercourse with the natives, and induced a chief to allow two of his sons to go with him to France, promising to return them the next year. There, also, he planted a cross with t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Columbus, Christopher 1435-1536 (search)
for me, and in which I found him needful to me, has been of some profit to him. This shall be done as he wishes. Item. That the said Messire Pedro, Gaspar, Beltran, and others remaining here came out in command of caravels which have now gone back, and are in receipt of no salary whatever; but, as these are people who should be employed in the most important and confidential positions, their pay has not been fixed, because it ought to be different from that of the rest. You will beg their Highnesses, therefore, on my behalf, to settle what ought to be given them, either yearly or monthly, for the advantage of their Highnesses' service. Given in the city of Isabella, the thirtieth of January, in the year fourteen hundred and ninety-four. This point has been already replied to above; but, as in the said clause he says that they should receive their pay, it is now their Highnesses' command that their salary shall be paid to them from the time that they gave up their command.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
lorer, died in Virginia......Oct. 18, 1526 [Sailing, with three vessels and 600 persons, with supplies for a colony, along the coast, he enters Chesapeake Bay and attempts a settlement near Jamestown, where he died. His colonists returned to Santo Domingo in the spring of 1527.] Pizarro, Francisco, Spanish adventurer; born in Spain about 1471; assassinated at Lima, Peru, Jan. 26, 1541. The destroyer of the Peruvian government......1531-33 Cartier, Jacques, born in St. Malo, France, 1494, died about 1555; the discoverer of the river St. Lawrence......1534-35 Almagro, Diego de, Spanish adventurer, born in Spain in 1463 (?) with Pizarro in Peru; put to death by Pizarro......July, 1538 De Soto, Fernando, born in Spain in 1496 (?); died on the banks of the Mississippi, June, 1542; explorer of the southern United States; discoverer of the Mississippi......1540-42 Coronado, Francesco Vasquez de, died in 1542; explorer of the territory north of Mexico, now New Mexico, Ari
urface, a flat bottom b is required. 2. A tool for making a countersink depression. In watch-making, the countersinks c c are of the flat-bottom class; a central stem passes into the hole for the shank of the screw, and acts as guide for the cutting edge. f is a tapering countersink formed by a wing twisted into a spiral cutting edge. Coun′ter-sink-bit. A boring-tool having a conical or cylindrical cutter, which makes a depression to suit the head of a screw. See c d e f g, Fig. 1494. Coun′ter-sunk-head′ed bolt. A bolt having a beveled head, which is let into a corresponding cavity in one of the pieces which it binds together. See bolt. Coun′ter-sunk nail. A nail with a conical head like a wood-screw. Coun′ter Swal′low-tail. (Fortification.) An outwork in the form of a single tenaille, with a wide gorge. Coun′ter-tim′ber. (Shipbuilding.) One of the timbers in that part of a ship's stern which overhangs the stern-post. Coun′te
ilders were inveterate smokers. — Squier; Davis. c. When the Spaniards landed in Paraguay, in 1503, the chewing natives spurted the juice toward them. Pizarro found tobacco-chewers in Peru. Masticatories were used anciently in Europe. Plutarch says that the chewing of mallows is very wholesome, and the stalk of asphodel very luscious. See also tea. d. Snuffling was practiced by the Aztecs and by the Brazilians. See Brazilian snuff-mill, Fig. 5262, page 2232. Roger Pane, in 1494, speaks of the inhalation of snuff through tubes. The principal tobacco of commerce is derived from the Nicotiana tabacum, the American plant; the Nicotiana persica, or Persian tobacco, and N. rustica, or Syrian, are used in Europe and Asia. It is also grown in Africa, and the native name indicates that it is of the common stock. The genus Nicotiana belongs to the Solanaceoe, which includes the nightshade, potato, and tomato. The name Nicotiana is derived from Jean Nicot, the minister o
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