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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages of the English Nation to Newfoundland , to the Isles of Ramea, and the Isles of Assumption otherwise called Natiscotec, situate at the mouth of the River of Canada, and to the coastes of Cape Briton, and Arambec, corruptly called Norumbega, with the Patents, letters, and advertisements thereunto belonging. (search)
s all that hitherto I can learne, or finde out of this voyage. The voyage of M. Hore and divers other gentlemen, to Newfoundland , and Cape Briton, in the yere 1536 and in the 28 yere of king Henry the 8. ONE master Hore of London, a man of goodly stature and of great courage, and given to the studie of Cosmographie, in the 28 yere of king Henry the 8 and in the yere of our Lord 1536 encouraged divers Gentlemen and others, being assisted by the kings favour and good countenance, to accompany him in a voyage of discoverie upon the Northwest parts of America : wherein his perswasions tooke such effect, that within short space many gentlemen of the Innesrty were gentlemen, which all we mustered in warlike maner at Graves-end, and after the receiving of the Sacrament, they embarked themselves in the ende of Aprill. 1536. From the time of their setting out from Gravesend , they were very long at sea, to witte, above two moneths, and never touched any land untill they came to par
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Hore and divers other gentlemen, to Newfoundland , and Cape Briton, in the yere 1536 and in the 28 yere of king Henry the 8. (search)
The voyage of M. Hore and divers other gentlemen, to Newfoundland , and Cape Briton, in the yere 1536 and in the 28 yere of king Henry the 8. ONE master Hore of London, a man of goodly stature and of great courage, and given to the studie of Cosmographie, in the 28 yere of king Henry the 8 and in the yere of our Lord 1536 encoura1536 encouraged divers Gentlemen and others, being assisted by the kings favour and good countenance, to accompany him in a voyage of discoverie upon the Northwest parts of America : wherein his perswasions tooke such effect, that within short space many gentlemen of the Innes of court, and of the Chancerie, and divers others of good worship,rty were gentlemen, which all we mustered in warlike maner at Graves-end, and after the receiving of the Sacrament, they embarked themselves in the ende of Aprill. 1536. From the time of their setting out from Gravesend , they were very long at sea, to witte, above two moneths, and never touched any land untill they came to par
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
superior in number, or the work is of a very inferior character, or the garrison is destitute of the requisite means and energy to resist an attack, they will not be taken. Mezieres was not taken in 1520; nor Marseilles in 1524; nor Peronne in 1536; nor Landrecies in 1543; nor Metz in 1552; nor Montauban in 1621; nor Lerida in 1647; nor Maestricht in 1676; nor Vienna in 1529, and again in 1683; nor Turin in 1706; nor Conde in 1744; nor Lille in 1792; nor Landau in 1793; nor Ulm in 1800; nor Chartres. In 1429 it repulsed the attack of Charles VII. In 1464 the Count of Charlerois surrounded the city, but was unsuccessful in his attacks. In 1472 it repulsed the army of the Duke of Bourgone, who had already ravaged its precincts. In 1536, when attacked by Charles V., it again owed its safety to its walls. In 1588 and 1589 it repulsed the armies of Henry III. and Henry IV. In 1636 and several succeeding years the inhabitants of Paris owed their safety to its walls. If this capi
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 2: early political action and military training. (search)
nd never allowed a man, woman, or child to work more than ten hours except in time of pressure of business. At such time they were given pay for every extra hour they worked, and it was left wholly optional with them whether they should or should not work the extra hours. In 1852 I was elected to the legislature. While there I endeavored to remedy a great wrong and outrage which had been done to a Catholic educational institution of the order of St. Ursula. This order was established in 1536, to give relief to the sick, and educate gratuitously female youth, and the merits of its work were so great that it escaped even in Europe the persecutions which there frequently visited monastic institutions. Quite latterly the object of this mission was confined to the education of female youth, and its convents were established in America as seminaries of learning. In 1820 such an institution was founded in Boston, and six years later was removed to Mount Benedict, a twin Ruins of U
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar Nuñez 1490-1560 (search)
reasurer, and he and three others were all of a party who escaped from shipwreck and the natives. These four lived for several years among the Indians, and, escaping, made their way to the Spanish settlements in northern Mexico in the spring of 1536. In the following year Cabeza, de Vaca returned to Spain; in 1540 was appointed governor of Paraguay; in 1543 explored the upper Paraguay River, and in 1544 was deposed by the colonists and afterwards imprisoned and sent to Spain. After trial heh of which are of considerable historical value, and have been published in various languages. He died in Seville, some time after 1560. The journey through New Mexico. The following is his narrative of his journey through New Mexico in 1535-36, from his Relation: We told these people that we desired to go where the sun sets; and they said inhabitants in that direction were remote. We commanded them to send and make known our coming; but they strove to excuse themselves the best they
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Columbus, Christopher 1435-1536 (search)
Columbus, Christopher 1435-1536 (Cristoforo Colombo), discoverer of America; born in or near Genoa about 1435. At the age of ten years he was placed in the University of Pavia, where he was instructed in the sciences which pertain to navigation. In 1450 he entered the marine service of Genoa, and remained in it twenty years. His brother Bartholomew (q. v.) was then in Lisbon, engaged in constructing maps and charts, and making an occasional voyage at sea. Thither Christopher went in 1470.onument to his memory on which were inscribed the words, A Castilla y a Leon Nuevo Mundo Dio Colon— To Castile and Leon Columbus gave a New world. He died in the belief that the continent he had discovered was Asia. His remains were conveyed, in 1536, to Santo Domingo, where they were deposited in the cathedral, and there they yet remain, despite a comparatively recent declaration by the Spanish government that his remains had been transferred to the cathedral in Havana. A noble monument to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frobisher, Martin 1536- (search)
Frobisher, Martin 1536- Navigator; born in Doncaster, Yorkshire, England, about 1536; was a mariner by profession, and yearned for an opportunity to go in search of a northwest passage to India. For fifteen years he tried in vain to get pecuniary aid to fit out ships. At length the Earl of Warwick and others privately fitted out two small barks of 25 tons each and a pinnace, with the approval of Queen Elizabeth, and with these he sailed from Deptford in June, 1576, declaring that he would1536; was a mariner by profession, and yearned for an opportunity to go in search of a northwest passage to India. For fifteen years he tried in vain to get pecuniary aid to fit out ships. At length the Earl of Warwick and others privately fitted out two small barks of 25 tons each and a pinnace, with the approval of Queen Elizabeth, and with these he sailed from Deptford in June, 1576, declaring that he would succeed or never come back alive. As the flotilla passed the palace at Greenwich, the Queen, sitting at an open window, waved her hand towards the commander in token of good — will and farewell. Touching at Greenland, Frobisher crossed over and coasted up the shores of Labrador to latitude 63°, where he entered what he supposed to be a strait, but which was really a bay, which yet bears the name of Frobisher's Inlet. He landed, and promptly took possession of the country around in the name
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Printing-press, the (search)
sheet. Difficulties that at first appeared have been overcome, and now the press used for a great daily newspaper will print the paper on both sides and fold, ready for delivery, at the rate of 96,000 four-page or 48,000 eight-page sheets per hour. Printing was introduced into the thirteen original States of the United States by the following named persons at the time and place noted: MassachusettsCambridgeStephen Day1639 VirginiaWilliamsburgJohn Buckner1680-82 Pennsylvanianear PhiladelphiaWilliam Bradford1685 New YorkNew York CityWilliam Bradford1693 ConnecticutNew LondonThomas Short1709 MarylandAnnapolisWilliam Parks1726 South CarolinaCharlestonEleazer Phillips1730 Rhode IslandNewportJames Franklin1732 New JerseyWoodbridgeJames Parker1751 North CarolinaNew-BerneJames Davis1749 New HampshirePortsmouthDaniel Fowle1756 DelawareWilmingtonJames Adams1761 GeorgiaSavannahJames Johnston1762 The first book published in America was issued in 1536 in the city of Mexico.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
lmagro, Diego de, Spanish adventurer, born in Spain in 1463 (?) with Pizarro in Peru; put to death by Pizarro......July, 1538 De Soto, Fernando, born in Spain in 1496 (?); died on the banks of the Mississippi, June, 1542; explorer of the southern United States; discoverer of the Mississippi......1540-42 Coronado, Francesco Vasquez de, died in 1542; explorer of the territory north of Mexico, now New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado......1540-42 Frobisher, Sir Martin, born in England in 1536; died in Plymouth, England, Nov. 7, 1594; discovers Frobisher's Strait......July 21, 1576 Drake, Sir Francis, born in England in 1537 (?); died in Puerto Bello, Dec. 27, 1595; explores the coast of California in 1578-79; first Englishman to sail around the globe, reaching England......1580 Davis, John, born in England in 1550; died on the coast of Malacca in 1605; discoverer of Davis's Strait in 1585; of the Falkland Islands......1592 Hudson, Henry, born in England; discoverer and e
661. Its notes are remarkable for power rather than sweetness, and require uncommon skill in the performer to render them even moderately pleasing to a cultivated ear, unless from the force of habit or the associations connected with the instrument. De gustibus non est disputandum, — the Romans flavored their sausages with asafetida. Pipers are still attached to the Highland regiments in the British service. The antiquarian notices of the instrument are in the Musurgia of Luscinius, 1536, and in Don Quixote. Bagpipes. The Irish bagpipe was originally the same as the Scotch, but they now differ in having the mouthpiece supplied by the bellows A, which, being filled by the motion of the piper's arm, to which it is fastened, fills the bag B; whence, by the pressure of the other arm, the wind is conveyed into the chanter C, which is played on by the fingers like the common pipe. By means of a tube the wind is conveyed into drones a a a, which, being tuned at octaves to e
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