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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
So that it resteth not possible (so farre as my simple reason can comprehend) that this perpetuall current can by any meanes be maintained, but onely by continuall reaccesse of the same water, which passeth thorow the fret, and is brought about thither againe, by such circular motion as aforesayd. And the certaine falling thereof by this fret into Mar del Sur is prooved by the testimonie and experience, of Bernard de la Torre, who was sent from P. de la Natividad to the Moluccae, Anno domini 1542. by commandement of Anthony Mendoza, then Viceroy of Nova Hispania, which Bernard sayled 750. Leagues, on the Northside of the Aequator, and there met with a current, which came from the Northeast the which drove him backe againe to Tidore. Wherfore, this current being proved to come from C. de buona Speranca to the fret of Magellan, and wanting sufficient entrance there, by narrownes of the straite, is by the necessitie of natures force, brought to Terra de Labrador, where Jaques Cartie
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse written by Sir Humphrey Gilbert Knight, to prove a passage by the Northwest to Cathaia, and the East Indies. (search)
So that it resteth not possible (so farre as my simple reason can comprehend) that this perpetuall current can by any meanes be maintained, but onely by continuall reaccesse of the same water, which passeth thorow the fret, and is brought about thither againe, by such circular motion as aforesayd. And the certaine falling thereof by this fret into Mar del Sur is prooved by the testimonie and experience, of Bernard de la Torre, who was sent from P. de la Natividad to the Moluccae, Anno domini 1542. by commandement of Anthony Mendoza, then Viceroy of Nova Hispania, which Bernard sayled 750. Leagues, on the Northside of the Aequator, and there met with a current, which came from the Northeast the which drove him backe againe to Tidore. Wherfore, this current being proved to come from C. de buona Speranca to the fret of Magellan, and wanting sufficient entrance there, by narrownes of the straite, is by the necessitie of natures force, brought to Terra de Labrador, where Jaques Cartie
So that it resteth not possible (so farre as my simple reason can comprehend) that this perpetuall current can by any meanes be maintained, but onely by continuall reaccesse of the same water, which passeth thorow the fret, and is brought about thither againe, by such circular motion as aforesayd. And the certaine falling thereof by this fret into Mar del Sur is prooved by the testimonie and experience, of Bernard de la Torre, who was sent from P. de la Natividad to the Moluccae, Anno domini 1542. by commandement of Anthony Mendoza, then Viceroy of Nova Hispania, which Bernard sayled 750. Leagues, on the Northside of the Aequator, and there met with a current, which came from the Northeast the which drove him backe againe to Tidore. Wherfore, this current being proved to come from C. de buona Speranca to the fret of Magellan, and wanting sufficient entrance there, by narrownes of the straite, is by the necessitie of natures force, brought to Terra de Labrador, where Jaques Cartie
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The discoverie of the large, rich, and beautifull Empire of Guiana, with a relation of the great and golden citie of Manoa (which the Spaniards call El Dorado) and the provinces of Emeria, Aromaia, Amapaia, and other countries, with their rivers adjoyning. Performed in the yeere 1595 by Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Captaine of Her Majesties Guard, Lorde Warden of the Stanneries, and Her Highnesse Lieutenant Generall of the Countie of Corne-wall. (search)
eafter) thought that this Inga (of whom this emperour now living is descended) tooke his way by the river of Amazones, by that branch which is called Papamene: for by that way followed Orellana (by the commandement of Gonzalo Pizarro, in the yere 1542) whose name the river also beareth this day, which is also by others called Marannon, although Andrew Thevet doeth affirme that betweene Marannon and Amazones there are 120 leagues: but sure it is that those rivers have one head and beginninch of Amazones or Orellana, of which I will speake more in another place. It was attempted by Ordas ; but it is now little lesse then 70 yeres since that Diego Ordas, a knight of the order of Saint Iago attempted the same: and it was in the yeere 1542 that Orellana discovered the river of Amazones; but the first that ever saw Manoa was Juan Martinez master of the munition to Ordas . At a port called Morequito in Guiana there lieth at this day a great anker of Ordas his ship; and this port is
eafter) thought that this Inga (of whom this emperour now living is descended) tooke his way by the river of Amazones, by that branch which is called Papamene: for by that way followed Orellana (by the commandement of Gonzalo Pizarro, in the yere 1542) whose name the river also beareth this day, which is also by others called Marannon, although Andrew Thevet doeth affirme that betweene Marannon and Amazones there are 120 leagues: but sure it is that those rivers have one head and beginninch of Amazones or Orellana, of which I will speake more in another place. It was attempted by Ordas ; but it is now little lesse then 70 yeres since that Diego Ordas, a knight of the order of Saint Iago attempted the same: and it was in the yeere 1542 that Orellana discovered the river of Amazones; but the first that ever saw Manoa was Juan Martinez master of the munition to Ordas . At a port called Morequito in Guiana there lieth at this day a great anker of Ordas his ship; and this port is
rdinarily and usually frequented by M. Robert Reniger, M. Thomas Borey, and divers other substantial and wealthie marchants of Southampton , about 60. yeeres past, that is to say in the yeere 1540. A voyage of one Pudsey to Baya in Brasil anno 1542.ALSO the worshipfull M. Edward Cotton of Southampton Esquire gave mee more particularly to understand, how that one Pudsey of Southampton, a man of good skill and resolution in marine causes, made a voyage in like maner 62. yeeres agoe to Baya de todos los Santos the principall towne of all Brasil , and the seate of the Portugal vice-roy and of the bishop, and that he built a fort not farre distant from that place, in the foresaid yeere 1542. A letter written to M. Richard Staper by John Whithal from Santos in Brasil , the 26. of June 1578.WORSHIPFULL sir, and welbeloved friend M. Staper, I have me most heartily commended unto you, wishing your health even as mine owne. These few words may bee to let you understand, that whereas I
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage of one Pudsey to Baya in Brasil anno 1542. (search)
A voyage of one Pudsey to Baya in Brasil anno 1542.ALSO the worshipfull M. Edward Cotton of Southampton Esquire gave mee more particularly to understand, how that one Pudsey of Southampton, a man of good skill and resolution in marine causes, made a voyage in like maner 62. yeeres agoe to Baya de todos los Santos the principall towne of all Brasil , and the seate of the Portugal vice-roy and of the bishop, and that he built a fort not farre distant from that place, in the foresaid yeere 154voyage of one Pudsey to Baya in Brasil anno 1542.ALSO the worshipfull M. Edward Cotton of Southampton Esquire gave mee more particularly to understand, how that one Pudsey of Southampton, a man of good skill and resolution in marine causes, made a voyage in like maner 62. yeeres agoe to Baya de todos los Santos the principall towne of all Brasil , and the seate of the Portugal vice-roy and of the bishop, and that he built a fort not farre distant from that place, in the foresaid yeere 1542.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Geo'rgius PERIPATETICUS or Geo'rgius the PERIPATETIC (search)
PERIPATETICUS or Geo'rgius the PERIPATETIC 41. PERIPATETICUS, or ANEPONYMUS, or GREGORIUS ANEPONYMUS. Works Epitome Philosophiae. Fabricius speaks of two works as having been published by Jo. Voegelinus, 8vo. Augsburg A. D. 1600. One is described as Epitome Organi Aristotelici, Gr. Lat., by Gregorius Aneponymus (i. e. without a surname); the other as Compendium Philosophicae, Gr. Lat., by Georgius Aneponymus. The two are probably one and the same work (comp. Fabr. Bibl. Gr. vol. iii. pp. 220, 494), and may probably be identified with a work noticed by Allatius (Diatrib. de Georg. apud Fabr. Bibl. Gr. vol. xii. p. 120) as extant in MS., and described by him as Georgii Monachi Epitome Philosophiae. Editions Jo. Voegelinus, 8vo. Augsburg A. D. 1600. It appears that a Latin version of the same work by Laurentius Valla was published in 8vo. at Basel, A. D. 1542; in which the original was ascribed to Nicephorus Blemmyda. Further Information Fabric. Bibl. Gr. vol. xi. p. 630.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Almagro, Diego de, (search)
Almagro, Diego de, A Spanish conqueror of Peru, and principal associate of Pizarro; born about 1464. Almagro, Pizarro, and a priest named Luque undertook the conquest of Peru, and effected it, with a small force, in 1533. Almagro was appointed governor of what is now Chile in 1534, extending his conquests into that region in 1535. He and Pizarro became bitter enemies. He conquered Cuzeo, the ancient capital of Peru. In a decisive battle near that place. in 1538, Almagro was defeated, made prisoner, and put to death by order of Pizarro. in July, 1538. Almagro was profligate, perfidious, and cruel. His barbarous treatment of the inca Atahualpa covered his name and fame with infamy. The inca's son rallied men, who assassinated Pizarro, July 26, 1541, and these were excuted by order of the Viceroy of Peru in 1542.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bankruptcy laws, past and present. (search)
est of the Twelve Tables of Rome. French laws have followed the Latin model, and, while somewhat modernized, even yet visit a degree of disgrace upon the unfortunate trader which would not long be tolerated by an Anglo-Saxon legislature. Since 1542 about forty bankruptcy laws and a number of insolvent debtor acts have been passed in England. In the United States the statute of 1898 is the fourth of a series of national laws, the others being named from the years 1800, 1841, and 1867 while, inning, insolvency statutes of local application and vastly divergent provisions have been on the books. In view of the interest in the subject, the following chronology may be valuable. We take the English statutes first: 1. The statute of 1542 was aimed at absconding or concealed debtors only. It made them criminals, deprived them of their property without giving them a discharge, and left them to the tender mercies of their creditors. It was followed by a number of similar laws. enl
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