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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 5 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 2 2 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1860., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Galba (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 1 (search)
ous brood of chickens, that the villa, to this day, is called the Vila of the Hens. The laurel groveThe conventional term for what is most commonly known as, The Laurel, meed of mighty conquerors, And poets sage. --Spenser's Faerie Queen. is retained throughout the translation. But the tree or shrub which had this distinction among the ancients, the Laurus nobilts of botany, the Daphne of the Greeks, is the bay tree, indigenous in Italy, Greece an( the East, and introduced into England about 1562. Our laurel is plant of a very different tribe, the Prunus lauro-cerasus, a native of th Levant and the Crimea, acclimated in England at a later period than the bay. flourished so much, that the Caesars procured thence the boughs and crowns they bore at their triumphs. It was also their constant custom to plant others on the same spot, immediately after a triumph; and it was observed that, a little before the death of each prince, the tree which had been set by him died away. But in the last
M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background, Introduction, Chapter 1 (search)
age of twenty, recast in French the even more juvenile effort of the famous scholar, expanding it to twice the size, introducing new personages, giving the old ones more to do, and while borrowing largely in language and construction, shaping it to his own ends and making it much more dramatic. Indeed, his tragedy strikes one as fitter for the popular stage than almost any other of its class, and this seems to have been felt at the time, for besides running through two editions in 1561 and 1562, it was reproduced by the Confrères with great success in the former year. Of course its theatrical merit is only relative, and it does not escape the faults of the Senecan school. Grévin styles his dramatis personae rather ominously and very correctly entreparleurs ; for they talk rather than act. They talk, moreover, in long, set harangues even when they are conversing, and Grévin so likes to hear them that he sometimes lets the story wait. Nor do they possess much individuality or
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A remembrance given by us the Governours, Consuls, and Assistants of the company of Merchants trading into Russia , the eight day of May 1561, to our trustie friend Anthonie Jenkinson, at his departure towards Russia , and so to Persia, in this our eight journey. (search)
urne thorow his dominions into Russia or elswhere. And for the sale of our kersies or other wares that you shall have with you, as our trust is that you will doe for our most profit and commoditie: even so we referre all unto your good discretion, aswell in the sale of our sayd goods, as to make our returne in such things as you shall finde there, and thinke best for our profit. But if passage cannot be had into Persia by Astracan, or otherwise, the next Summer, which shalbe in the yeere 1562, then our minde is, that you procure to sell our kersies, & other such wares as are appointed for Persia, in the Mosco, or other the Emperours dominions, if you may sell them for any reasonable price, and then to employ your selfe with such other of your servants, as you shall thinke meet for the search of the passage by Nova Zembla, or els you to returne for England as you thinke good. Provided alwayes, that if you do perceive or understand, that passage is like to be had into Persia the Sum
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The names of such countries as I Anthony Jenkinson have travelled unto, from the second of October 1546, at which time I made my first voyage out of England, untill the yeere of our Lord 1572, when I returned last out of Russia . (search)
have sailed over the Caspian sea, & discovered all the regions thereabout adjacent, as Chircassi, Comul, Shascal, Shirvan, with many others. I have travelled 40 daies journey beyond the said sea, towards the Oriental India, and Cathaia, through divers deserts and wildernesses, and passed through 5 kingdomes of the Tartars, and all the land of Turkeman and Zagatay, and so to the great citie of Boghar in Bactria , not without great perils and dangers sundry times. After all this, in An. 1562, I passed againe over the Caspian sea another way, and landed in Armenia , at a citie called Derbent, built by Alexander the great, & from thence travelled through Media, Parthia , Hircania, into Persia to the court of the great Sophie called Shaw Tamasso, unto whom I delivered letters from the Queenes majestie, and remained in his court 8 moneths, and returning homeward, passed through divers other countries. Finally I made two voyages more after that out of England into Russia , the one in
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The relation of one William Rutter to M. Anthony Hickman his master touching a voyage set out to Guinea in the yeere 1562, by Sir William Gerard, Sir William Chester, M. Thomas Lodge, the sayd Antony Hickman, and Edward Castelin : which voyage is also written in verse by Robert Baker. (search)
The relation of one William Rutter to M. Anthony Hickman his master touching a voyage set out to Guinea in the yeere 1562, by Sir William Gerard, Sir William Chester, M. Thomas Lodge, the sayd Antony Hickman, and Edward Castelin : which voyage is also written in verse by Robert Baker. WORSHIPFULL sir, my duty remembred, this shalbe to declare unto you the discourse of this our voyage, since our departure out of England from Dartmouth ; at which time I gave you to understand of our departure, which was the 25 of February 1562. Then having a prosperous winde we departed from thence, and sailed on our voyage untill we arrived at Cavo verde the 20 of March, making no abode there, but sailed along the coast to our first appointed port Rio de sestos, at which port we arrived the third of Aprill in the morning, having the sight of a Frenchman, who assoone as he perceived us, set saile and made to the sea: in the meane time we came to an anker in the rode: and after that he had espied our fl
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
njecture) may seeme to have bene some secret factour for M. Thorne and other English marchants in those remote partes; whereby it is probable that some of our marchants had a kinde of trade to the West Indies even in those ancient times and before also: neither doe I see any reason why the Spaniards should debarre us from it at this present. The first voyage of the right worshipfull and valiant knight sir John Hawkins, sometimes treasurer of her Majesties navie Roial, made to the West Indies 1562.MASTER JOHN HAUKINS having made divers voyages to the Iles of the Canaries, and there by his good and upright dealing being growen in love and favour with the people, informed himselfe amongst them by diligent inquisition, of the state of the West India, whereof hee had received some knowledge by the instructions of his father, but increased the same by the advertisments and reports of that people. And being amongst other particulars assured, that Negros were very good marchandise in Hispanio
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage of the right worshipfull and valiant knight sir John Hawkins, sometimes treasurer of her Majesties navie Roial, made to the West Indies 1562. (search)
The first voyage of the right worshipfull and valiant knight sir John Hawkins, sometimes treasurer of her Majesties navie Roial, made to the West Indies 1562.MASTER JOHN HAUKINS having made divers voyages to the Iles of the Canaries, and there by his good and upright dealing being growen in love and favour with the people, informed himselfe amongst them by diligent inquisition, of the state of the West India, whereof hee had received some knowledge by the instructions of his father, but increased the same by the advertisments and reports of that people. And being amongst other particulars assured, that Negros were very good marchandise in Hispaniola, and that store of Negros might easily bee had upon the coast of Guinea, resolved with himselfe to make triall thereof, and communicated that devise with his worshipful friendes of London : namely with Sir Lionell Ducket, sir Thomas Lodge, M. Gunson his father in law, sir William Winter, M. Bromfield, and others. All which persons liked so
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ARCUS CLAUDII (2) (search)
ARCUS CLAUDII (2) built by Claudius in 51/52 A.D. in commemoration of his victories in Britain (CIL vi. 920-923 =31203-4; Suet. Claud. 17; Dio lx. 19 ff., 22). It also formed part of the aqua Virgo, where this aqueduct crossed the via Lata, just north of the Saepta. It seems to have been in ruins as early as the eighth century, but in 1562, in 1641, and again in 1869 portions of the structure were found, including part of the principal inscription, inscriptions dedicated to other members of the imperial family, some of the foundations, and fragments of sculpture of which all traces have been lost. On coins issued in 46-47 A.D., as an ' intelligent anticipation' of events (BM Claud. 29, 32-35, 49-50; Cohen, Claudius 16-24), is a representation of an arch erected to commemorate these victories of Claudius, but whether it is this arch of the aqua Virgo is quite uncertain (HJ 468-9; LS iii. 125-6; PBS iii. 220-223). For reliefs recently discovered which may belong to it, see NS 1925,
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PAX, TEMPLUM (search)
as restored by Augustus (AJA 1923, 414; 1927, 1-18; RPAiii.83-95). In the time of Severus a wall was built across the north-east end of this entrance, The greater part of this wall was apparently rebuilt in the latter half of the >third century A.D. (RPA cit. 103-106; AJA cit. 16, 17). and on its north-east side, towards the forum, on a facing of marble slabs, was placed the so-called Capitoline Plan of the city, Forma Urbis Romae, the fragments of which were first discovered in May and June 1562. A facsimile is fixed to the wall of the garden of the Palazzo dei Conservatori. (For the description and discussion of this Plan, see Jord. Forma Urbis Romae regionum XIV, Berlin 1874; H. Elter, de Forma Urbis Romae, diss. i. ii., Bonn 1891; Hulsen, Piante icnografiche, Mitt. 1890, 46-63; Ann. d. Inst. 1867, 408- 423; 1883, 5-22; BC 1886, 270-274; 1893, 128-134; 1901, 3-7; Mitt. 1889, 79, 229; 1892, 267; RhM 1894, 420; HF i. p. 534; and for the discovery of new fragments, and the rearrangem
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Elizabeth, Queen of England (search)
n the supremacy claimed by the pope; the mass was abolished, and the liturgy of Edward VI. restored. In one session the whole system of religion in England was altered by the will of a single young woman. When Francis II. of France assumed the arms and title of King of England in right of his wife, Mary Stuart, Elizabeth sent an army to Scotland which drove the French out of the kingdom. She supported the French Huguenots with money and troops in their struggle with the Roman Catholics in 1562. In 1563 the Parliament, in an address to the Queen, entreated her to choose a husband, so as to secure a Protestant succession to the crown. She returned an evasive answer. She gave encouragement to several suitors, after she rejected Philip, among them Archduke Charles of Austria, the Duke of Anjou, and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. The latter remained her favorite until his death in 1588. During the greater part of Elizabeth's reign, Cecil, Lord Burleigh, was her prime minister.
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