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M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background, Introduction, chapter 3 (search)
ing on him other substantial favours, almost immediately named him Grand Almoner of France. Amyot was an indefatigable but deliberate worker. Fifteen years had elapsed between his first appearance as translator and the issue of his masterpiece. Thirteen more were to elapse before he had new material ready for the press. The interval in both cases was filled up with preparation, with learned labour, with the leisurely prosecution of his plan. A revised edition of the Lives appeared in 1565 and a third in 1567, and all the time he was pushing on a version of Plutarch's Moralia. Meanwhile in Charles gave him the bishopric of Auxerre; and without being required to disown the two literary daughters of his vivacious prime, somewhat curiously and voluptuously frounced and of too amorous fashion though they might be, he had yet to devote himself rather more seriously to his profession than he hitherto seems to have done. He set about it in his usual steady circumspect way. He compo
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voiage into Persia made by Tho. Alcock, who was slaine there, and by George Wrenne, & Ric. Cheinie servants to the worshipfull companie of Moscovie merchants in Anno 1563. written by the said Richard Cheinie. (search)
our Persian voyage what I judge: it is a voyage to bee followed. The king of Gillan, whereas yet you have had no traffique, liveth al by marchandise: and it is neere Casbin, and not past six weekes travaile from Ormus, whither all the spices be brought: and here, (I meane at Gillan) a trade may be established: But your worships must send such men as are no riotous livers, nor drunkards. For if such men goe, it wil be to your dishonour and great hinderance, as appeared by experience the yeere 1565. when as Richard Johnson went to Persia, whose journey had bene better stayed then set forward. For whereas before wee had the name among those heathen people to be such marchants as they thought none like in all respects, his vicious living there hath made us to be compted worse then the Russes. Againe, if such men travaile in your affaires in such a voyage, you shall never know what gaine is to be gotten. For how can such men imploy themselves to seeke the trade, that are inclined to su
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The thirde voyage into Persia, begun in the yeere 1565. by Richard Johnson, Alexander Kitchin, and Arthur Edwards. (search)
The thirde voyage into Persia, begun in the yeere 1565. by Richard Johnson, Alexander Kitchin, and Arthur Edwards. A letter of Arthur Edwards to M. Thomas Nicols, Secretarie to the worshipful company trading into Russia and other the North parts, concerning the preparation of their voyage into Persia. MASTER NICOLS, my bounden duetie remembred, with desire of God for the preservation of you and yours: you shall understand that the second of March I was sent by M. Thomas Glover (your Agent) unto Jeraslave, appointed to receive such goods as should come from Vologhda, as also such kinde of wares as should be bought and sent from Mosco by your Agent, and M. Edward Clarke, thought meete for your voyage of Persia. And further, I was to provide for biscuit, beere, and beefe, and other victuals, and things otherwayes needful according to advise. Thus I remained here until the comming of your Agent, which was the 12. of May, who taried here three dayes, to see us set forwards on our voyage,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage and travell of M. Caesar Fredericke, Marchant of Venice, into the East India, and beyond the Indies. Wherein are conteined the customes and rites of those countries, the merchandises and commodities, aswell of golde and silver, as spices, drugges, pearles, and other jewels: translated out of Italian by M. Thomas Hickocke. (search)
oever; whereas if they bring no horses, they pay 8 per cento of all their goods: and at the going out of Goa the horses pay custome, two and forty pagodies for every horse, which pagody may be of sterling money sixe shillings eight pence, they be pieces of golde of that value. So that the Arabian horses are of great value in those countreys, as 300, 400, 500 duckets a horse, and to 1000 duckets a horse. Bezeneger. THE city of Bezeneger was sacked in the yeere 1565, by foure kings of the Moores, which were of great power and might: the names of these foure kings were these following, the first was called Dialcan, the second Zamaluc, the third Cotamaluc, and the fourth Viridy: and yet these foure kings were not able to overcome this city and the king of Bezeneger, but by treason. This king of Bezeneger was a Gentile, and had, amongst all other of his captaines, two which were notable, and they were Moores: and these two captaines had either of them in ch
Bezeneger. THE city of Bezeneger was sacked in the yeere 1565, by foure kings of the Moores, which were of great power and might: the names of these foure kings were these following, the first was called Dialcan, the second Zamaluc, the third Cotamaluc, and the fourth Viridy: and yet these foure kings were not able to overcome this city and the king of Bezeneger, but by treason. This king of Bezeneger was a Gentile, and had, amongst all other of his captaines, two which were notable, and they were Moores: and these two captaines had either of them in charge threescore and ten or fourescore thousand men. These two captaines being of one religion with the foure kings which were Moores, wrought meanes with them to betray their owne king into their hands. The king of Bezeneger esteemed not the force of the foure kings his enemies, but went out of his city to wage battell with them in the fieldes; and when the armies were joyned, the battell lasted but a whi
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THERMAE TITI (search)
ut no actual buildings of the domus seem to have been removed to make room for them. In 238 A.D. some restoration was evidently contemplated (Hist. Aug. Max. et Balb. I), and incidental references to them occur in Martial (iii. 20. 15; 36. 6) and in later inscriptions (CIL vi. 9797 =AL 29. 4; IG xiv. 956 B 15 :para\ ta\s *titiana/s). Early in the sixteenth century Julius II brought to the Vatican a large granite basin, which had been seen on the site of these thermae in 1450; it was buried in 1565 by Pius IV, but dug up again by Paul V, Cf. Orbaan, Documenti sul Barocco, 302; the inscriptions set up by Paul V are given by De Angelis, S. Maria Maggiore, appendix, 6. and still stands in the Cortile di Belvedere (PBS ii. 26; HJ 308; Jahrb. d. Inst. 1890, 59). Later on, a basin of porphyry was found here and given by Ascanio Colonna to Julius III. It is now in the Sala Rotonda of the Vatican. In the same century Palladio made a plan of the ruins then existing (Devonshire coll. portf. v.;
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 6: the battle of Williamsburg. (search)
y annoying. The roads were cut into deep mud by the trains, and the sideways by troops far out on either side, making puddles ankle-deep in all directions, so that the march was slow and trying, but giving almost absolute safe-conduct against pursuit, and our men were allowed to spread their ranks in search of ground strong enough to bear them. My estimate, made on the field, of the troops engaged was, Confederate, 9000; Union, 12,000. The casualties of the engagement were, Confederate, 1565 aggregate; Rebellion Record, vol. XI. part i. p. 568. Federal, 2288 aggregate. Ibid. p. 450. General McClellan was at Yorktown during the greater part of the day to see Franklin's, Sedgwick's, and Richardson's divisions aboard the transports for his proposed flanking and rear move up York River, but upon receiving reports that the engagement at Williamsburg was growing serious and not satisfactory, he rode to the battle, and called the divisions of Sedgwick and Richardson to follow him
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
with joy by the Union people who remained there. Two days before Jacksonville was surrendered to Stevens, Fort Marion and the ancient city of St. Augustine, still farther down the coast, St. Augustine is the capital of St. John's County, Florida, and is situated on an estuary of the Atlantic, called North River, and two miles from the ocean. It is upon a plain a few feet above the sea. It is the oldest town in the United States founded by Europeans. The Spaniards built a fort there in 1565. were surrendered to Commander C. R. P. Rogers, who had crossed March 11. the bar in the Wabash. With a flag of truce, and accompanied by Mr. Dennis, of the Coast Survey, he landed, and was soon met by the Mayor of the town, who conducted him to the City Hall, where he was received by the Common Council. He was informed that two Florida companies, who had garrisoned the fort, had left the place on the previous evening, and that the city had no means for resistance, if there was a dispositio
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
em, which, at the same time causing them to appreciate the importance of the empire of the seas, furnished immense means for arriving at it. At this epoch, artillery and the military art were not less advanced among the Turks than the Europeans. Their grandeur was carried to its height under Solyman I, who besieged and took Rhodes, (1522,) with an armament which has been estimated at a hundred and forty thousand land troops, and which would still be considerable in reducing it by a half. In 1565, Mustapha and the celebrated Dragut made a descent at Malta, where the knights of Rhodes had made a new establishment; they conducted thirty-two thousand Janizaries, with a hundred and forty vessels. It is known how John of Vallette immortalized himself by repulsing him. A more formidable armament, which is estimated at two hundred galleys and fifty-five thousand men, was directed in 1527 against the island of Cyprus, where it took Nicosia, and laid siege to Famagousta. The horrible crue
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
VII.--Walter Lindsay, who fell at the battle of Flodden, 9th of September, 1513. He married a daughter of the noble family of Erskine, of Dun, a descendant of Sir Robert de Keith, Great Marischal of Scotland, who had command of the horse at Bannockburn. Walter Lindsay's second son, VIII.--Alexander Lindsay, married a daughter of Barclay, of Mathers. Their son, IX.--David Lindsay, was Bishop of Ross in 1600. His daughter, X.--Rachel Lindsay, married John Spottiswoode, who was born 1565. Douglas thus speaks of him: He became one of the greatest men of the kingdom for knowledge, learning, virtue and merit. He had few equals, and was excelled by none. He was Archbishop of St. Andrews, Lord High Chancellor of Scotland, etc., and in every station in life acquitted himself with dexterity, fidelity and honor, and as the life and transactions of this truly great man are fully recorded in his History of the Church of Scotland, and briefly by Mr. Crawford in his Lives of the Offic
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