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M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background, Introduction, Chapter 1 (search)
révin may really be due to the later and much more famous French Senecan Garnier, two of whose works have an undoubted though not very conspicuous place in the history of the English Drama generally, and especially of the Roman Play in England. Cornélie, the earlier and less successful of the pair, written in Garnier's twenty-eighth year, was performed at the Hôtel de Bourgogne in 1573, and was published in 1574. The young author was not altogether unpractised in his art, for already in 1568 he had written a drama on the subject of Portia, but he has not yet advanced beyond his predecessors, and like them, or perhaps more obviously than they, is at the stage of regarding the tragedy only as an elegy mixed with rhetorical expositions. The episode that he selected lent itself to such treatment. Cornelia, the daughter of Metellus Scipio, had after the loss of her first husband, the younger Cassius, become the wife of Pompey the Great, of whose murder she was an eye-witness. M
M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background, Introduction, chapter 3 (search)
uccessively an alderman of Cambridge, Lord Lieutenant of the County, and High Steward; while Thomas, who had benefited under his father's will, was presented to the freedom of the town. All through, the career of the junior appears as a sort of humble pendant to that of the senior, and he picks up his dole of the largesses that Fortune showers on the head of the house. What he had been doing in the intervening years we do not know, but he cannot have abandoned his literary pursuits, for in 1568, when he received this civic courtesy, he issued a new edition of the Diall, corrected and enlarged; and he followed it up in 1570 with a version of Doni's Morale Filosofia. Meanwhile the elder brother was advancing on his brilliant course. He had been sent to Vienna to invest the Emperor Maximilian with the Order of the Garter; he had been commissioned to present the Queen on his return with the portrait of her suitor, the Archduke Charles; he had held various offices at home, and in 15
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An Act for the corporation of Merchants adventurers for the discovering of new trades, made in the eight yeere of Queene Elizabeth. Anno 1566. (search)
any subject of this Realme, having presently any shipping, goods, wares, or ready money, remayning at or in any place, of or within the dominion of the said mighty prince of Russia , or in any other of the places prohibited to be visited or traffiqued unto by this statute or the said letters Patents, to fetch, bring, and convey the same, or cause the same to be brought or conveyed from thence by sea or otherwise, before the feast of S. John Baptist, which shalbe in the yeere of our Lord God 1568. any thing conteined in this statute, or in the said letters Patents to the contrary notwithstanding. Provided also, that it shall be lawfull for any of the subjects of this Realme, to saile to the port, towne, territorie, or castle of Wardhouse, or to any of the coastes, townes, havens, creekes, rivers, Islands, and land of Norway for trade of fishing, or any other trade there used by the subjects of this Realme, any thing in this statute to the contrary notwithstanding. And for the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Ambassage of the right worshipfull Master Thomas Randolfe, Esquire, to the Emperour of Russia, in the yeere 1568, briefly written by himselfe. (search)
The Ambassage of the right worshipfull Master Thomas Randolfe, Esquire, to the Emperour of Russia, in the yeere 1568, briefly written by himselfe. THE 22 day of June, in the yere of our Lord 1568, I went aboord the Harry, lying in the road at Harwich with my company, being to the number of fortie persons or thereabout: of which the one halfe were gentlemen, desirous to see the world. Within one dayes sailing, we were out of the sight of land, and following our course directly North, till w1568, I went aboord the Harry, lying in the road at Harwich with my company, being to the number of fortie persons or thereabout: of which the one halfe were gentlemen, desirous to see the world. Within one dayes sailing, we were out of the sight of land, and following our course directly North, till we came to the North Cape, we sailed for the space of twelve dayes with a prosperous winde, without tempest or outrage of sea: having compassed the North Cape we directed our course flat Southeast, having upon our right hand Norway , Wardhouse, Lapland , all out of sight till we came to Cape Gallant: and so sailing betweene two bayes, the two and thirtieth day after our departure from Harwich , we cast ancre at Saint Nicholas road. In all the time of our voyage, more then the great number of
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine letters in verse, written by Master George Turbervile out of Moscovia, which went as Secretarie thither with Master Tho. Randolph , her Majesties Ambassadour to the Emperour 1568, to certeine friends of his in London, describing the maners of the Countrey and people. (search)
Certaine letters in verse, written by Master George Turbervile out of Moscovia, which went as Secretarie thither with Master Tho. Randolph , her Majesties Ambassadour to the Emperour 1568, to certeine friends of his in London, describing the maners of the Countrey and people. To his especiall friend Master Edward Dancie. MY Dancie deare, when I recount within my brest, My London friends, and wonted mates, and thee above the rest: I feele a thousand fits of deepe and deadly woe, To thinke that I from land to sea, from blisse to bale did go. I left my native soile, full like a retchlesse man, And unacquainted of the coast, among the Russes ran: A people passing rude, to vices vile inclinde, Folke fit to be of Bacchus traine, so quaffing is their kinde. Drinke is their whole desire, the pot is all their pride, The sobrest head doth once a day stand needfull of a guide. If he to banket bid his friends, he will not shrinke On them at dinner to bestow a douzen kindes of drinke: Suc
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fourth voyage into Persia, made by M. Arthur Edwards Agent, John Sparke, Laurence Chapman, Christopher Faucet, and Richard Pingle, in the yeere 1568. declared in this letter written from Casbin in Persia by the foresaide Laurence Chapman to a worshipfull merchant of the companie of Russia in London. Anno Domini 1569. Aprill 28. (search)
The fourth voyage into Persia, made by M. Arthur Edwards Agent, John Sparke, Laurence Chapman, Christopher Faucet, and Richard Pingle, in the yeere 1568. declared in this letter written from Casbin in Persia by the foresaide Laurence Chapman to a worshipfull merchant of the companie of Russia in London. Anno Domini 1569. Aprill 28. WORSHIPFULL sir, my duetie alwayes remembred, and your prosperous health, and good successe in all your affaires wished, to the glory of God, and your owne hearts desire, &c. May it please you to understand that your Agent M. Arthur Edwards and we departed from Yeraslave in July 1568. and the 14. of August arrived at our port called Bilbil, with your ship the Grace of God, and the goods in her in good safetie, God bee thanked for it, finding there neither the people so ready to ayd us for the bringing of her in, & unlading of the goods, nor yet so obedient to the Shaughs privilege, as the worshipfull company have bene informed. Our goods brought upon land,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift voiage into Persia made by M. Thomas Banister, and master Geofrey Ducket, Agents for the Moscovie companie, begun from England in the yeere 1568. and continuing to the yeere 1574. following. Written by P. I. from the mouth of M. Lionel Plumtree. (search)
The fift voiage into Persia made by M. Thomas Banister, and master Geofrey Ducket, Agents for the Moscovie companie, begun from England in the yeere 1568. and continuing to the yeere 1574. following. Written by P. I. from the mouth of M. Lionel Plumtree. UPON the 3. day of July 1568. they embarked themselves at Yeraslave, being accompanied with Lionel Plumtree, and some 12. English men more, in a Barke called the Thomas Bonaventure of the burden of 70. tunnes, taking also along with them of Russes to the number of 40. for their use and imploiments. It fell out in the way, before they came to Astracan by 40. miles, that the Nagaian Tartars, being a kind of thievish and cruel people, made an assault upon them with 18. boates of theirs, each of them being armed, some with swords, some with speares, and some others with bowes and arrowes, and the whole number of them they discovered to be about 300. men. They for their parts, although they could have wished a quiet voyage and journey wit
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The deposition of M. William Burrough to certaine Interrogatories ministred unto him concerning the Narve, Kegor, &c. to what king or prince they doe appertaine and are subject, made the 23 of June, 1576. These articles seeme to have bene ministred upon the quarel between Alderman Bond the elder, and the Moscovie company, for his trade to the Narve without their consent. (search)
rtaine and are subject, made the 23 of June, 1576. These articles seeme to have bene ministred upon the quarel between Alderman Bond the elder, and the Moscovie company, for his trade to the Narve without their consent. FIRST, whether the villages or townes vulgarely called the Narve, Kegor, Pechingo and Cola, and the portes of the same townes, as well at the time of the grant of the letters of privilege by the Emperour to our merchants, as also in the yeeres of our Lord, 1566, 1567, 1568, 1569, 1570, 1571, 1572, 1573, 1574, and 1575, respectively were (as presently they be) of the jurisdiction, and subject to the mightie prince the Emperour of Russia: and whether the saide Emperour of Russia, by all the time aforesaide, was chiefe lord and governour respectively of the said places, and so vulgarly knowen, had, and reputed: and whether the said townes and places, and either of them be situated towards the North and Northeast or Northwest, and between the North and the East poi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Henrie Lane to the worshipfull M. William Sanderson, conteining a briefe discourse of that which passed in the Northeast discovery for the space of three and thirtie yeres. (search)
en by Henry Lane, Agent, and delivered to the companie, 1561. The trade to Rie, and Revel, of old time hath bene long since frequented by our English nation, but this trade to the Narve was hitherto concealed from us by the Danskers and Lubeckers. Anno 1561. the said Master Anthony Jenkinson went Agent into Russia, who the next yeere after, passing all the river of Volga to Astracan, and over the Caspian sea, arrived in Persia, and opened the trade thither. Also betweene the yeeres of 1568. and 1573. sundry voyages after Master Jenkinsons, were made by Thomas Alcock, Arthur Edwards, Master Thomas Bannister, and Master Geffrey Ducket, whose returne (if spoyle neere Volga had not prevented by roving theeves) had altogether salved and recovered the companies (called the olde companies) great losse, charges, and damages: but the saying is true, By unitie small things grow great, & by contention great things become small. This may be understood best by the company. The frowardnes
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
h our Northwest passage. 7 Moreover, the passage is certainely prooved by a Navigation that a Portugall made, who passed through this fret, giving name to a Promontorie farre within the same, calling it after his owne name, Promontorium Corterialis, neere adjoyning unto Polisacus fluvius. 8 Also one Scolmus a Dane entred and passed a great part thereof. 9 Also there was one Salvaterra, a Gentleman of Victoria in Spaine, that came by chance out of the West Indias into Ireland , Anno 1568. who affirmed the Northwest passage from us to Cataia, constantly to be beleeved in America navigable. And further said in the presence of sir Henry Sidney (then lord Deputie of Ireland) in my hearing, that a Frier of Mexico, called Andrew Urdaneta, more then eight yeeres before his then comming into Ireland , told him there, that he came from Mar del Sur into Germany through this Northwest passage, & shewed Salvaterra (at that time being then with him in Mexico) a Sea Card made by his owne
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