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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Claudius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 20 (search)
ation of this mole, he sunk the vessel in which the great obeliskSuetonius calls this " the great obelisk " in comparison with those which Augustus had placed in the Circus Maximus and Campus Martius. The one here mentioned was erected by Caligula in his Circus, afterwards called the Circus of Nero. It stood at Heliopolis, having been dedicated to the sun, as Herodotus informs us, by Phero, son of Sesostris, in acknowledgment of his recovery from blindness. It was removed by Pope Sixtus V. in 1586, under the celebrated architect, Fontana, to the centre of the area before St. Peter's, in the Vatican, not far from its former position. This obelisk is a solid piece of red granite, without hieroglyphics, and, with the pedestal and ornaments at the top, is 182 feet high. The height of the obelisk itself is 113 palms, or 84 feet. had been brought from Egypt;Pliny relates some curious particulars of this ship:-"A fir tree of prodigious size was used in the vessel which, by the command of Cal
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Pheodor Ivanowich the new Emperors gracious letter of privilege to the English Merchants word for word, obtained by M. Jerome Horsey, 1586. (search)
Pheodor Ivanowich the new Emperors gracious letter of privilege to the English Merchants word for word, obtained by M. Jerome Horsey, 1586. THROUGH the wil of the almightie, and without beginning God, which was before this world, whom we glorifie in ye Trinitie, one only God the father, the sonne, and the holy ghost, maker of all things, worker of all in all every where, fulfiller of all things, by which will and working, he both loveth and giveth life to man, That our onely God, which inspireth every one of us his onely children with his word, to discerne God through our Lord Jesus Christ, and the holy quickning spirit of life now in these perilous times, Establish us to keep the right Scepter, and suffer us of our selves to raigne to the good profite of the land, and to the subduing of the people, together with the enemies, and to the maintenance of vertue. We Pheodor the ofspring of John, the great Lord, Emperor, king and great prince of all Russia , of Volodemeria, Moscovia an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The contents of M. Garlands Commission unto Thomas Simkinson for the bringing of M. John Dee to the Emperour of Russia his Court. (search)
nto the Countrey. And because hee may doubt of these proffers, hee shall remaine at the borders untill the Emperour be certified of him, and of his requests, which he would have. And I am sure he shall be conveyed through the land with five hundred horses, and hee shalbe accompted as one of the chiefest in the land next the Emperour. Also shew him howe that my Lord Protectour at my comming away did take me in his armes, and desired me as hee should be my friend to bring him with me, and he would give him of his owne purse yeerely 1000. rubbles besides the Emperours allowance. All these foresaide grauntes and demaunds doe I Thomas Simkinson acknowledge to be spoken by Edward Garland to mee, and to be sent to declare the same unto Master John Dee. And in witnesse that this is of a trueth I have written the same with my owne hand, and thereunto set my name, in Wittingaw, otherwise called Trebona, the 18. of September, Anno 1586. By me Thomas Simkinson of Hull.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter to the right worshipfull M. John Dee Esquire, conteyning the summe and effect of M. Edward Garland his message, delivered to Master Dee himselfe, (Letterwise) for a more perfect memoriall thereof. Anno 1586. (search)
A letter to the right worshipfull M. John Dee Esquire, conteyning the summe and effect of M. Edward Garland his message, delivered to Master Dee himselfe, (Letterwise) for a more perfect memoriall thereof. Anno 1586. RIGHT worshipfull, it may please you to understand, that I was sent unto you from the most mightie Prince Feodor Ivanowich, Lord, Emperour and great duke of Russia , &c. As also from the most excellent prince Boris Feodorowich, Lord Protector of Russia: to give your worship to understand the great good will and heartie desire they beare unto you; for that of long time they have had great good report of your learning & wisedom, as also of your good counsel unto Princes: whereupon his Majesties most earnest desire and request is unto you; that you would take the paines to come unto his Citie of Mosco, to visite his Majesties Court: for that hee is desirous of your company, and also of your good counsell in divers matters that his Majestie shall thinke needfull. And for the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Passeport of the Earle of Leicester for Thomas Forster gentleman travailing to Constantinople. (search)
neus generalis exercitus ejusdem Regiae majestatis in Belgio , & gubernator generalis Hollandiae, Zelandiae, & provinciarum unitarum & associatarum, omnibus ad quos praesentes literae pervenerint, salutein. Cum lator praesentium Thomas Forster nobilis Anglus necessariis de causis hinc Constantinopolim profecturus sit, & inde ad nos quanta potest celeritate reversurus: petimus ab omnibus & singulis Regibus, principibus, nobilibus, magistratibus, & aliis, mandent & permittant dicto Thomae cum duobus famulis liberum transitum per eorum ditiones & territoria sine detentione aut impedimento injusto, & provideri sibi de necessariis justum precium reddenti, ac aliter convenienter & humaniter tractari, ut occasiones ejus eundi & redeundi requirent: Sicut nos Majestates, Serenitates, Celsitudines, & dominationes vestrae paratos invenietis, ut vestratibus in similibus casibus gratum similiter faciamus. Datum in castris nostris Duisburgi, decimo die Septembris, anno 1586. stylo veteri.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage passed by sea into Aegypt, by John Evesham Gentleman. Anno 1586. (search)
The voyage passed by sea into Aegypt, by John Evesham Gentleman. Anno 1586. THE 5 of December 1586 we departed from Gravesend in the Tiger of London, wherein was Master under God for the voyage Robert Rickman, and the 21. day at night we came to the Isle of Wight: departing from thence in the morning following we had a faire winde, so that on the 27 day wee came in sight of the rocke of Lisbone, and so sayling along we came in sight of the South Cape, the 29 of the same, and on the morrowe with a Westerly winde we entred the straights: and the second of January being as high as Cape de Gate, we departed from our fleete towards Argier. And the 4 day we arrived at the port of Argier aforesaid, where we staled till the first of March. At which time we set saile towardes a place called Tunis , to the Eastward of Argier 100 leagues, where we arrived the 8 of the same. This Tunis is a small citie up 12 miles from the sea, and at the port or rode where shipping doe ride, is a castle or
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage of M. Laurence Aldersey, to the Cities of Alexandria, and Cayro in Ægypt. Anno 1586. (search)
The second voyage of M. Laurence Aldersey, to the Cities of Alexandria, and Cayro in Ægypt. Anno 1586. I EMBARKED my selfe at Bristoll, in the Hercules, a good ship of London, and set saile the 21 day of Februarie, about ten of the clocke in the morning, having a merry winde: but the 23 day, there arose a very great storme, and in the mids of it we descried a small boate of the burden of ten tunnes, with foure men in her, in very great danger, who called a maine for our helpe. Whereupon our Master made towardes them, and tooke them into our ship, and let the boate, which was laden with timber, and appertained to Chepstow , to runne a drift. The same night about midnight arose another great storme, but the winde was large with us, untill the 27 of the same moneth, which then grew somewhat contrary: yet notwithstanding we held on our course, and the tenth day of March, we descried a saile about Cape Sprat, which is a litle on this side the streight of Gibraltare, but we spake not
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of a worthy fight, performed in the voyage from Turkie, by five Ships of London, against 11. Gallies, and two Frigats of the King of Spaines, at Pantalarea within the Streights, Anno, 1586. Written by Philip Jones. (search)
A true report of a worthy fight, performed in the voyage from Turkie, by five Ships of London, against 11. Gallies, and two Frigats of the King of Spaines, at Pantalarea within the Streights, Anno, 1586. Written by Philip Jones. THE Marchants of London, being of the incorporation of the Turky trade, having received intelligences, and advertisements, from time to time, that the King of Spaine grudging at the prosperitie of this kingdome, had not onely of late arrested al English ships, bodies, and goods, in Spaine, but also maligning the quiet trafique which they used to and in the dominions, and provinces, under the obedience of the Great Turke, had given order to the Captaines of his gallies in the Levant , to hinder the passage of all English ships, and to endevour by their best meanes, to intercept, take, and spoile them, their persons, and goods: they hereupon thought it their best course to set out their fleete for Turkie, in such strength and abilitie for their defence, tha
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Thomas Stukeley, wrongfully called Marques of Ireland, into Barbary 1578. Written by Johannes Thomas Freigius in Historia de caede Sebastiani Regis Lusitaniae. (search)
in this battell (besides Don Sebastian the king) the duke de Avero, the two bishops of Coimbra & of Porto , the Marques of Irland sent by the Pope as his Commissary generall, Christopher de Tavara, and many others, cap. 13. IT is further also to be remembred, that divers other English gentlemen were in this battell, whereof the most part were slaine; and among others M. Christopher Lyster was taken captive, and was there long detained in miserable servitude. Which gentleman although at length he happily escaped the cruel hands of the Moores; yet returning home into England, and for his manifold good parts being in the yeere 1586. employed by the honourable the Earle of Cumberland, in a voyage intended by the Streights of Magellan for the South sea, as Viceadmirall, (wherein he shewed singular resolution and courage) and appointed afterward in divers places of speciall command and credite, was last of all miserably drowned in a great and rich Spanish prize upon the coast of Cornwall .
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage to the Azores with two pinases, the one called the Serpent, and the other the Mary Sparke of Plimouth, both of them belonging to Sir Walter Ralegh, written by John Evesham Gentleman, wherein were taken the governour, of the Isle of Sainct Michael, and Pedro Sarmiento governour of the Straits of Magalanes, in the yeere 1586. (search)
A voyage to the Azores with two pinases, the one called the Serpent, and the other the Mary Sparke of Plimouth, both of them belonging to Sir Walter Ralegh, written by John Evesham Gentleman, wherein were taken the governour, of the Isle of Sainct Michael, and Pedro Sarmiento governour of the Straits of Magalanes, in the yeere 1586.THE 10. of June 1586. we departed from Plimouth with two Pinases, the one named the Serpent, of the burden of 35. Tunnes, and the other the Mary Sparke of Plimouth of the burthen of 50. Tuns, both of them belonging to sir Walter Ralegh knight; and directing our course towards the coast of Spaine, & from thence towards the Isles of the Azores, we tooke a small barke laden with Sumacke and other commodities, wherein was the governour of S. Michaels Island, being a Portugal , having other Portugals and Spaniards with him. And from thence we sailed to the Island of Graciosa, to the Westward of the Island of Tercera, where we discried a saile, and bearing wit
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