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rumpet a Call, & afterwardes many familiar English tunes of Songs, and called to them friendly; but we had no answere, we therefore landed at day-breake, and comming to the fire, we found the grasse & sundry rotten trees burning about the place. From hence we went thorow the woods to that part of the Iland directly over against Dasamongwepeuk, & from thence we returned by the water side, round about the North point of the Iland, untill we came to the place where I left our Colony in the yeere 1586. In all this way we saw in the sand the print of the Salvages feet of 2 or 3 sorts troaden ye night, and as we entred up the sandy banke upon a tree, in the very browe thereof were curiously carved these faire Romane letters C R 0: which letters presently we knew to signifie the place, where I should find the planters seated, according to a secret token agreed upon betweene them & me at my last departure from them, which was, that in any wayes they should not faile to write or carve on the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
oted by himselfe in the time of his travels, continued in those parts, the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres. IN the yeere of our Lord 1561, in the moneth of July, I John Chilton went out of this city of London into Spaine, where I remained for the space of seven yeres, & from thence I sailed into Nova Hispania, and so travelled there, and by the South Sea, unto Peru , the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres: and after that time expired, I returned into Spaine, and so in the yere 1586 in the moneth of July, I arrived at the foresayd city of London : where perusing the notes which I had taken in the time of my travell in those yeeres, I have set downe as followeth. In the yeere 1568, in the moneth of March, being desirous to see the world, I embarked my selfe in the bay of Cadiz in Andaluzia, in a shippe bound for the Isles of the Canaries, where she tooke in her lading, & set forth from thence for the voyage, in the moneth of June, the same yere. Within a moneth after
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A notable discourse of M. John Chilton, touching the people, maners, mines, cities, riches, forces, and other memorable things of New Spaine, and other provinces in the West Indies, seene and noted by himselfe in the time of his travels, continued in those parts, the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres. (search)
oted by himselfe in the time of his travels, continued in those parts, the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres. IN the yeere of our Lord 1561, in the moneth of July, I John Chilton went out of this city of London into Spaine, where I remained for the space of seven yeres, & from thence I sailed into Nova Hispania, and so travelled there, and by the South Sea, unto Peru , the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres: and after that time expired, I returned into Spaine, and so in the yere 1586 in the moneth of July, I arrived at the foresayd city of London : where perusing the notes which I had taken in the time of my travell in those yeeres, I have set downe as followeth. In the yeere 1568, in the moneth of March, being desirous to see the world, I embarked my selfe in the bay of Cadiz in Andaluzia, in a shippe bound for the Isles of the Canaries, where she tooke in her lading, & set forth from thence for the voyage, in the moneth of June, the same yere. Within a moneth after
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
corded by one Lopez Vaz a Portugall borne in the citie of Elvas , in maner follow: which Portugale, with the discourse about him, was taken at the river of Plate by the ships set foorth by the Right Honourable the Earle of Cumberland, in the yeere 1586.THERE was a certaine English man named Francis Drake, who having intelligence how the towne of Nombre de Dios in Nueva Espanna, had but small store of people remaining there, came on a night, and entred the Port with foure Pinnesses, and landed ab appointed to keepe those coastes : and the first yeere they tooke sixe or seven French ships. And after that this was knowen, there were no more Englishmen or Frenchmen of warre that durst adventure to approch the coast, untill this present yeere 1586, that the aforesayd Francis Drake, with a strong fleete of 24 ships arrived there, and made spoile of Santo Domingo, Carthagena, and S. Augustine, things that are knowen to all the worlde. But it is likely that if the King of Spaine live, he wil
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage attempted and set foorth by the expert and valiant captaine M. Francis Drake himselfe, with a ship called the Dragon, and another ship and a Pinnesse, to Nombre de Dios, and Dariene, about the yeere 1572, Written and recorded by one Lopez Vaz a Portugall borne in the citie of Elvas , in maner follow: which Portugale, with the discourse about him, was taken at the river of Plate by the ships set foorth by the Right Honourable the Earle of Cumberland, in the yeere 1586. (search)
The first voyage attempted and set foorth by the expert and valiant captaine M. Francis Drake himselfe, with a ship called the Dragon, and another ship and a Pinnesse, to Nombre de Dios, and Dariene, about the yeere 1572, Written and recorded by one Lopez Vaz a Portugall borne in the citie of Elvas , in maner follow: which Portugale, with the discourse about him, was taken at the river of Plate by the ships set foorth by the Right Honourable the Earle of Cumberland, in the yeere 1586.THERE was a certaine English man named Francis Drake, who having intelligence how the towne of Nombre de Dios in Nueva Espanna, had but small store of people remaining there, came on a night, and entred the Port with foure Pinnesses, and landed about 150 men, & leaving 70 men with a trumpet, in a Fort which was there, with the other 80 he entred the towne, without doing any harme, till he came to the market place, and there discharged his calivers, & sounded a trumpet very loud, and the other which he had
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of John Oxnam of Plimmouth, to the west India , and over the straight of Dariene into the South sea. Anno 1575. Written by the foresaid Lopez Vaz in the said discourse. (search)
t have come to those Countreys, but never saw English men there but onely those two of whom I have spoken. And although there have many Frenchmen bene on the coast, yet never durst they put foote upon land, only those two English men adventured it, and did such exploits, as are before remembred. All these things comming to the hearing of the king of Spaine, he provided two Gallies well appointed to keepe those coastes : and the first yeere they tooke sixe or seven French ships. And after that this was knowen, there were no more Englishmen or Frenchmen of warre that durst adventure to approch the coast, untill this present yeere 1586, that the aforesayd Francis Drake, with a strong fleete of 24 ships arrived there, and made spoile of Santo Domingo, Carthagena, and S. Augustine, things that are knowen to all the worlde. But it is likely that if the King of Spaine live, he will in time provide sufficient remedy, to keepe his countreys and subjects from the invasion of other nations.
honourable the Earle of Cumberland, in the yere 1586. intended for The South sea, but performed no fe same voyage.THE 26. day of June, in the yeere 1586. and in the 28. yeere of the Queenes majesties le of Cumberland for the South sea in the yeere 1586. FRANCIS DRAKE an Englishman being on the sea, f warre to come on the coast, untill this yeere 1586. when as the aforesaid Francis Drake came with an first found them, unto this present yeere of 1586, when I have once ended my discourse of Magellaniards as other nations unto this present yeere 1586. It is foure yeeres since these poore and miserthe whole earth, begun in the yeere of our Lord 1586, and finished 1588. Written by Master Francis Piling betweene certeine places out of England , 1586. IN primis, We were sailing betweene England are we arrived after our departure from England 1586.IN primis, Wee ankered in the harborow of Sierrng of the winds for the most part of our voyage 1586.IN primis, From the 21 day of July unto the 19
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage set out by the right honourable the Earle of Cumberland, in the yere 1586. intended for The South sea, but performed no farther then the latitude of 44. degrees to the South of the Equinoctial, Written by M. John Sarracoll marchant in the same voyage. (search)
The voyage set out by the right honourable the Earle of Cumberland, in the yere 1586. intended for The South sea, but performed no farther then the latitude of 44. degrees to the South of the Equinoctial, Written by M. John Sarracoll marchant in the same voyage.THE 26. day of June, in the yeere 1586. and in the 28. yeere of the Queenes majesties raigne, wee departed from Gravesend in two ships; the Admirall called The red dragon, and the other The barke Clifford , the one of the burden of 2601586. and in the 28. yeere of the Queenes majesties raigne, wee departed from Gravesend in two ships; the Admirall called The red dragon, and the other The barke Clifford , the one of the burden of 260. tunnes, with 130. men, and the other of the burden of 130. tunnes, with 70. men: the Captaine of the Admirall was M. Robert Withrington, Of the viceadmirall M. Christopher Lister, both being furnished out at the costs and charges of the right honourable the Erle of Cumberland, having for their masters two brethren, the one John Anthonie, and the other William Anthonie. The 24. of July wee came into the sound of Plimmouth, and being there constrained by Westerly winds, to stay till the 1
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse of the West Indies and South sea written by Lopez Vaz a Portugal , borne in the citie of Elvas , continued unto the yere 1587. Wherein among divers rare things not hitherto delivered by any other writer, certaine voyages of our Englishmen are truely reported: which was intercepted with the author thereof at the river of Plate, by Captaine Withrington and Captaine Christopher Lister, in the fleete set foorth by the right Honorable the Erle of Cumberland for the South sea in the yeere 1586. (search)
Christopher Lister, in the fleete set foorth by the right Honorable the Erle of Cumberland for the South sea in the yeere 1586. FRANCIS DRAKE an Englishman being on the sea, and having knowledge of the small strength of the towne of Nombre de Dios, ships. So soone as this was knowen there used fewe English or French men of warre to come on the coast, untill this yeere 1586. when as the aforesaid Francis Drake came with a strong fleete of about foure and twentie ships, and did such harme as is you all the shippes that have past through the said streights, since Magellan first found them, unto this present yeere of 1586, when I have once ended my discourse of Magellan his owne voyage. Nowe you are by the way to understande, that the North sthis is all the discovery of the Streights of Magellan, made as well by Spaniards as other nations unto this present yeere 1586. It is foure yeeres since these poore and miserable Spaniards were left in the Streights, from which time there hath no su
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The admirable and prosperous voyage of the Worshipfull Master Thomas Candish of Trimley in the Countie of Suffolke Esquire, into the South sea, and from thence round about the circumference of the whole earth, begun in the yeere of our Lord 1586, and finished 1588. Written by Master Francis Pretty lately of Ey in Suffolke, a Gentleman employed in the same action. (search)
The admirable and prosperous voyage of the Worshipfull Master Thomas Candish of Trimley in the Countie of Suffolke Esquire, into the South sea, and from thence round about the circumference of the whole earth, begun in the yeere of our Lord 1586, and finished 1588. Written by Master Francis Pretty lately of Ey in Suffolke, a Gentleman employed in the same action.WEE departed out of Plimmouth on Thursday the 2 . of July 1586. with 3. sayles, to wit, The Desire a ship of 120. tunnes, The Content of 60 tuns, and the Hugh gallant a barke of 40. tunnes: in which small Fleete were 123. persons of all sortes with all kinde of furniture and victuals sufficient for the space of two yeeres, at the charges of the worshipfull Master Thomas Candish of Trimley in the Countie of Suffolke Esquire, beeing our Generall. On Tuesday the 26. of the same moneth, we were 45. leagues from Cape Finis terrae where wee mette with 5. sayles of Biskaynes comming from the Grande Bay in Newfound-land, as we s
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