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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine rare and special notes most properly belonging to the voyage of M. Thomas Candish next before described; concerning the heights, soundings, lyings of lands, distances of places, the variation of the Compasse, the just length of time spent in sayling betweene divers places, and their abode in them, as also the places of their harbour and anckering, and the depths of the same, with the observation of the windes on severall coastes: Written by M. Thomas Fuller of Ipswich, who was Master in the desire of M. Thomas Candish in his foresaid prosperous voyage about the world. (search)
e at the most to the Westward, that was, that the Northnortheast was our North. A note of our time spent in sailing betweene certeine places out of England , 1586. IN primis, We were sailing betweene England and the coast of Guinea from the 21 day of July unto the 26 day of August unto the haven called Sierra leona, where we be rendered immortall praise and thankesgiving now and for ever. Amen. A note of our ankering in those places where we arrived after our departure from England 1586.IN primis, Wee ankered in the harborow of Sierra leona in 10 fadoms water: and a Northwest winde in that rode is the woorst that can blow. Item, You may anker urst. Item, You may anker on the North part of the island of Santa Helena in 12 fadoms water. A note of our finding of the winds for the most part of our voyage 1586.IN primis, From the 21 day of July unto the 19 day of August we found the winde at Northnortheast, being in the latitude of 7 degrees. Item, From the 19 day of
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A note of our time spent in sailing betweene certeine places out of England , 1586. (search)
A note of our time spent in sailing betweene certeine places out of England , 1586. IN primis, We were sailing betweene England and the coast of Guinea from the 21 day of July unto the 26 day of August unto the haven called Sierra leona, where we watered and stayed untill the 6 day of September. Item, Wee departed from the coast of Guinea for the coast of Brasil the 10 day of September, and wee had sight of the coast of Brasil the 26 day of October, being sixe leagues to the Northwards of Cape Frio: and from thence wee were sailing unto the iland of S. Sebastian untill the 31 and last day of October, where wee watered and set up our pinnesse: and we ankered on the Northwest part of the iland in tenne fadoms, and stayed there untill the 23 day of November. Item, The 23 day of November we departed from the iland of Sant Sebastian, keeping our course South and by West unto the port that is called Port Desire, where we arrived the 17 day of December; in which port we graved our
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A note of our ankering in those places where we arrived after our departure from England 1586. (search)
A note of our ankering in those places where we arrived after our departure from England 1586.IN primis, Wee ankered in the harborow of Sierra leona in 10 fadoms water: and a Northwest winde in that rode is the woorst that can blow. Item, You may anker under the island that is called Ilha Verde in 6 fadoms water: and the winde being at the Westnorthwest is the woorst winde that can blow. Item, You may anker under the island of S. Sebastian on the Northwest part in 10 fadoms: and a Westsouthwest winde is the woorst winde. Item, You may anker in Port Desire in 5 fadoms water, and a West and by South winde is the woorst. Item, You may anker under Cape Joy without the mouth of the Streights of Magellan in 7 fadoms water. Item, You may anker within the Streights of Magellan, untill you come unto the first narrowing in 25 or 30 fadoms water, in the mid way of the Streights. Item, You may anker in the second narrow of the Streights in 16 fadoms water. Item, You may a
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A note of our finding of the winds for the most part of our voyage 1586. (search)
A note of our finding of the winds for the most part of our voyage 1586.IN primis, From the 21 day of July unto the 19 day of August we found the winde at Northnortheast, being in the latitude of 7 degrees. Item, From the 19 day of August unto the 28 day of September, wee found the wind for the most part betweene the West and the Southwest, being in 24 degrees. Item, From the 28 day of September unto the 30 day of October, we found the windes betweene the Northeast and the Eastnortheast. Item, From the 23 of November, from the island of S. Sebastian, unto the 30 day of November, we found the winde betweene the Southeast and the Southsoutheast, being in 36 degrees. Item, From the 30 day of November unto the 6 day of December, we found the windes to be betweene the West and the Southwest. Item, From the 6 day of December unto the first day of January, we found the winds for the most part betweene the North and the Northeast, being then in the latitude of 52 degrees.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
ption: Not as to Frenchmen, but as Lutherans. When the news of the massacre reached France, Dominic de Gourges determined to avenge the same, and with 150 men sailed for Florida, captured the fort on the St. John's River, and hanged the entire garrison, having affixed this inscription above them: Not as to Spaniards, but as murderers. Being too weak to attack St. Augustine, Gourges returned to France. The city of St. Augustine was founded in 1565, and was captured by Sir Francis Drake in 1586. The domain of Florida, in those times, extended indefinitely westward, and included Louisiana. La Salle visited the western portion in 1682, and in 1696 Pensacola was settled by Spaniards. At the beginning of the eighteenth century the English in the Carolinas attacked the Spaniards at St. Augustine; and, subsequently, the Georgians, under Oglethorpe, made war upon them. By the treaty of Paris, in 1763, Florida was exchanged by the Spaniards, with Great Britain, for Cuba, which had the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hooker, Thomas 1586-1647 (search)
Hooker, Thomas 1586-1647 Clergyman; born in Marketfield, Leicestershire, England, in 1586; was a popular Non-conformist preacher in London, but was silenced, when he kept a school, in which John Eliot, the Apostle, was his assistant. Hooker fled from persecution to Holland in 1630, and arrived at Boston in September, 1633. He was ordained pastor of the church at Newtown, and in June, 1636, he and his whole congregation began a migration to the valley of the Connecticut, where they founded1586; was a popular Non-conformist preacher in London, but was silenced, when he kept a school, in which John Eliot, the Apostle, was his assistant. Hooker fled from persecution to Holland in 1630, and arrived at Boston in September, 1633. He was ordained pastor of the church at Newtown, and in June, 1636, he and his whole congregation began a migration to the valley of the Connecticut, where they founded Hartford. He was exceedingly influential in all New England. He died in Hartford, Conn., July 7, 1647.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Laudonniere, Rene Goulaine de 1562-1586 (search)
Laudonniere, Rene Goulaine de 1562-1586 Colonist; born in France; first came to America in 1562 with the Huguenot colony under Ribault. In the spring of 1564 he was sent by Coligni with three ships to assist the first colony, but finding the Ribault settlement abandoned, went to Florida and built Fort Caroline on the St. Johns River. In the onslaught made upon the French colony by the Spaniards, Sept. 21, 1565, Laudonniere escaped. He wrote a history of the Florida enterprise, and died iGoulaine de 1562-1586 Colonist; born in France; first came to America in 1562 with the Huguenot colony under Ribault. In the spring of 1564 he was sent by Coligni with three ships to assist the first colony, but finding the Ribault settlement abandoned, went to Florida and built Fort Caroline on the St. Johns River. In the onslaught made upon the French colony by the Spaniards, Sept. 21, 1565, Laudonniere escaped. He wrote a history of the Florida enterprise, and died in France after 1586.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Printing. (search)
Printing. The first printing in America was done in the city of Mexico, in 1539. There were then about 200 printing-offices in Europe. The second press was set up in Lima, Peru, in 1586, and the third was erected in Cambridge, Mass., in 1639. In 1638 Rev. Jesse Glover started for Massachusetts with his family, having in his care a printing-press given to the colony by some friends in Holland. He was accompanied by Stephen Day, a practical printer. Mr. Glover died on the voyage, and, under the direction of the authorities in Boston, Day set up the press at Cambridge, and began printing there in January, 1639. Its first production was The Freeman's oath, and the first literary work issued by it was a new metrical version of the psalms, a revision of those of Sternhold and Hopkins. This was the beginning of book-printing in the United States. It was forty years before another printing-press was set up in this country. The first printing-press at work west of the Alleghany
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Saltonstall, Sir Richard 1586-1658 (search)
Saltonstall, Sir Richard 1586-1658 Colonist; born in Halifax, England, in 1586. He, with others, signed an agreement, Aug. 26, 1629, to settle permanently in New England provided that the government be transferred to them and the other colonists. The proposition was accepted and he was made first assistant to Governor Winthrop, with whom he arrived in New England on June 22, 1630. He, however, was forced to return to England in 1631 owing to the illness of his two daughters, but continue1586. He, with others, signed an agreement, Aug. 26, 1629, to settle permanently in New England provided that the government be transferred to them and the other colonists. The proposition was accepted and he was made first assistant to Governor Winthrop, with whom he arrived in New England on June 22, 1630. He, however, was forced to return to England in 1631 owing to the illness of his two daughters, but continued to manifest deep interest in the affairs of the colonists. He died in England about 1658.
ng a removable chamber, insertable in the breech, where it was wedged, for the purpose of containing the charge of powder. The balls originally used were of stone, in some cases weighing 800 pounds or more, as is the case of the Mohammed II. gun, mentioned presently. Fig. 1064 shows the relative sizes, and, to some extent, the mode of construction, of a number of the larger and more celebrated of the pieces of ordnance. a is the Tzar-Pooschka, the great bronze gun of Moscow, cast in 1586. Bore, 122 in. long, 36 in. diameter; chamber 70 in. long, 19 in. diameter; total exterior length, 210 in.; weight, 86,240 pounds. b, great bronze gun of Bejapoor, India, Malik-IMydan, the Master of the field. Cast in 1548. Bore, 28.5 in.; total length, 170.6 in.; weight, 89,600 pounds. c, bronze cannon of Mohammed II., A. D. 1464. Bore, 25 in.; total length, 17 ft.; weight, 41,888 pounds. d, the Dulle-Griete, of Ghent, Holland. Wroughtiron, made in 1430. Bore, 25 in.; total le
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