Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1586 AD or search for 1586 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
ption: Not as to Frenchmen, but as Lutherans. When the news of the massacre reached France, Dominic de Gourges determined to avenge the same, and with 150 men sailed for Florida, captured the fort on the St. John's River, and hanged the entire garrison, having affixed this inscription above them: Not as to Spaniards, but as murderers. Being too weak to attack St. Augustine, Gourges returned to France. The city of St. Augustine was founded in 1565, and was captured by Sir Francis Drake in 1586. The domain of Florida, in those times, extended indefinitely westward, and included Louisiana. La Salle visited the western portion in 1682, and in 1696 Pensacola was settled by Spaniards. At the beginning of the eighteenth century the English in the Carolinas attacked the Spaniards at St. Augustine; and, subsequently, the Georgians, under Oglethorpe, made war upon them. By the treaty of Paris, in 1763, Florida was exchanged by the Spaniards, with Great Britain, for Cuba, which had the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hooker, Thomas 1586-1647 (search)
Hooker, Thomas 1586-1647 Clergyman; born in Marketfield, Leicestershire, England, in 1586; was a popular Non-conformist preacher in London, but was silenced, when he kept a school, in which John Eliot, the Apostle, was his assistant. Hooker fled from persecution to Holland in 1630, and arrived at Boston in September, 1633. He was ordained pastor of the church at Newtown, and in June, 1636, he and his whole congregation began a migration to the valley of the Connecticut, where they founded1586; was a popular Non-conformist preacher in London, but was silenced, when he kept a school, in which John Eliot, the Apostle, was his assistant. Hooker fled from persecution to Holland in 1630, and arrived at Boston in September, 1633. He was ordained pastor of the church at Newtown, and in June, 1636, he and his whole congregation began a migration to the valley of the Connecticut, where they founded Hartford. He was exceedingly influential in all New England. He died in Hartford, Conn., July 7, 1647.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Laudonniere, Rene Goulaine de 1562-1586 (search)
Laudonniere, Rene Goulaine de 1562-1586 Colonist; born in France; first came to America in 1562 with the Huguenot colony under Ribault. In the spring of 1564 he was sent by Coligni with three ships to assist the first colony, but finding the Ribault settlement abandoned, went to Florida and built Fort Caroline on the St. Johns River. In the onslaught made upon the French colony by the Spaniards, Sept. 21, 1565, Laudonniere escaped. He wrote a history of the Florida enterprise, and died iGoulaine de 1562-1586 Colonist; born in France; first came to America in 1562 with the Huguenot colony under Ribault. In the spring of 1564 he was sent by Coligni with three ships to assist the first colony, but finding the Ribault settlement abandoned, went to Florida and built Fort Caroline on the St. Johns River. In the onslaught made upon the French colony by the Spaniards, Sept. 21, 1565, Laudonniere escaped. He wrote a history of the Florida enterprise, and died in France after 1586.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Printing. (search)
Printing. The first printing in America was done in the city of Mexico, in 1539. There were then about 200 printing-offices in Europe. The second press was set up in Lima, Peru, in 1586, and the third was erected in Cambridge, Mass., in 1639. In 1638 Rev. Jesse Glover started for Massachusetts with his family, having in his care a printing-press given to the colony by some friends in Holland. He was accompanied by Stephen Day, a practical printer. Mr. Glover died on the voyage, and, under the direction of the authorities in Boston, Day set up the press at Cambridge, and began printing there in January, 1639. Its first production was The Freeman's oath, and the first literary work issued by it was a new metrical version of the psalms, a revision of those of Sternhold and Hopkins. This was the beginning of book-printing in the United States. It was forty years before another printing-press was set up in this country. The first printing-press at work west of the Alleghany
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Saltonstall, Sir Richard 1586-1658 (search)
Saltonstall, Sir Richard 1586-1658 Colonist; born in Halifax, England, in 1586. He, with others, signed an agreement, Aug. 26, 1629, to settle permanently in New England provided that the government be transferred to them and the other colonists. The proposition was accepted and he was made first assistant to Governor Winthrop, with whom he arrived in New England on June 22, 1630. He, however, was forced to return to England in 1631 owing to the illness of his two daughters, but continue1586. He, with others, signed an agreement, Aug. 26, 1629, to settle permanently in New England provided that the government be transferred to them and the other colonists. The proposition was accepted and he was made first assistant to Governor Winthrop, with whom he arrived in New England on June 22, 1630. He, however, was forced to return to England in 1631 owing to the illness of his two daughters, but continued to manifest deep interest in the affairs of the colonists. He died in England about 1658.