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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 2 2 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter to the right worshipfull M. John Dee Esquire, conteyning the summe and effect of M. Edward Garland his message, delivered to Master Dee himselfe, (Letterwise) for a more perfect memoriall thereof. Anno 1586. (search)
ng; and the Lord Protectour will give you a thousand rubbles, as also your provision for your table you shall have free out of his Majesties kitchin: And further whatsoever you shall thinke needefull or convenient for you, in any part or parts of his dominion, it shall be at your worships commaundement. And this is the summe and effect of my message and commandement given me by his Majestie and the Lord Protectour. In witnesse whereof I have written this with my owne hand, the 17. of December 1586. By me Edward Garland. In Trebona Castel otherwise called Wittingaw in Boemia: to which place this M. Edward Garland came to M. Dee with two Moscovites to serve him, &c. He had sixe more, which by M. Dees counsell were sent backe. Witnesse M. Edward Kelley, and M. Francis Garland, brother to the foresaid Edward, and divers others. IT seemeth that this princely offer of the Emperour Pheodor Ivanowich, and of the L. Boris Pheodorowich P
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage passed by sea into Aegypt, by John Evesham Gentleman. Anno 1586. (search)
The voyage passed by sea into Aegypt, by John Evesham Gentleman. Anno 1586. THE 5 of December 1586 we departed from Gravesend in the Tiger of London, wherein was Master under God for the voyage Robert Rickman, and the 21. day at night we came to the Isle of Wight: departing from thence in the morning following we had a faire winde, so that on the 27 day wee came in sight of the rocke of Lisbone, and so sayling along we came in sight of the South Cape, the 29 of the same, and on the morrowe with a Westerly winde we entred the straights: and the second of January being as high as Cape de Gate, we departed from our fleete towards Argier. And the 4 day we arrived at the port of Argier aforesaid, where we staled till the first of March. At which time we set saile towardes a place called Tunis , to the Eastward of Argier 100 leagues, where we arrived the 8 of the same. This Tunis is a small citie up 12 miles from the sea, and at the port or rode where shipping doe ride, is a castle or