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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 13: Sharpsburg or Antietam (search)
brigades extending from the Hagerstown pike through the corn-field to the right. Trimble's brigade, on their right, connected with D. H. Hill's division. Hays's brigade had also just been brought up in rear of Lawton's as a support. Across the pike, Doubleday's division had, at the same time, made a furious attack upon the old Jackson division under J. R. Jones. This division, though of four brigades, was one of the smallest in the army, Jones reporting that it went into action with only 1600 men. Its position, on the extreme left, was exposed to the view of, and enfiladed and taken in reverse by, the enemy's rifle batteries, across the Antietam, at a range of about 3000 yards. Hooker's troops were well handled; both his infantry and artillery and the full fighting power of his whole corps was soon brought into play and skilfully applied. The Confederate resistance was desperate, and the slaughter upon both sides great; Lawton and J. R. Jones were both borne off wounded within an
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
rs, and was overlooked for nearly two hours. Owing to this oversight, and the non-pursuit of Law, both he and Jenkins were able to cross the bridge before daylight. No artillery was used by the Confederates, but Knaps's battery of four guns, with Geary, was severely engaged at close quarters, expending 224 rounds and losing 3 killed and 19 wounded. Geary's total casualties were:— 34 killed, 174 wounded, 8 missing: total 216. These all occurred in Greene's and Cobham's brigades about 1600 strong. The Federal casualties in the brigades opposing Law were:— 45 killed, 150 wounded, 7 missing: total 204. These occurred principally in Tyndale's and Orland Smith's brigades. The aggregate was 420. The Confederate casualties reported are as follows:— Law: 3 killed, 19 wounded, 30 missing: total 52. Jenkins: 31 killed, 286 wounded, 39 missing: total 356. Aggregate 408. The character of the attack by Jenkins's brigade, and of the defence by Greene's and Cobham's, aided<
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XIV (search)
eneral direction of the line was nearly perpendicular to that before the attack; only the right was in contact with the enemy, and was therefore much exposed. Apprehensive that the enemy, instead of retreating during the night, would mass and attack our right in the morning, I requested that a division of infantry be sent to reinforce the right, which was ordered accordingly from Major-General Smith's command. In response to this order, General Smith sent five regiments and a battery (about 1600 men), which were put in reserve near the right. In the morning it was found that the enemy still held his position in our front, of which the hill in front of General Couch was the key, and had thrown up considerable breastworks during the night. He had also increased the force on his left during the night, and continued to mass troops there during the early part of the day. During the morning, therefore, our operations were limited to preparations for defense and cooperation with the caval
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Charles I. 1600- (search)
Charles I. 1600- King of England; second son of James I.; was born at Dunfermline, Scotland, Nov. 19, 1600. The death of his elder brother, Henry, in 1612, made him heir-apparent to the throne, which he ascended as King in 1625. He sought the hand of the infanta of Spain, but finally married (1625) Henrietta Maria, daughter of Henry IV. of France. She was a Roman Catholic, and had been procured for Charles by the infamous Duke of Buckingham, whose influence over the young King was disastrous to England and to the monarch himself. Charles was naturally a good man, but his education, especially concerning the doctrine of the divine right of kings and the sanctity of the royal prerogative, led to an outbreak in England which cost him his life. Civil war began in 1641, and ended with his execution at the beginning of 1649. His reign was at first succeeded by the rule of the Long Parliament, and then by Cromwell—halfmonarch, called the Protector. After various vicissitudes
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwaleys, or Cormwaleys, Thomas (search)
Cornwaleys, or Cormwaleys, Thomas pioneer; born about 1600; was one of the leaders in the establishment of the colony at St. Mary's. In 1635 he led a force against Claiborne, and in 1638, when Lord Baltimore sent out a code to be adopted by the General Assembly, he opposed it, alleging that the charter of the freemen gave them the right to enact their own laws. During 1638 he was made deputy governor; in 1642 was commissioned commander of an expedition against the Indians; in 1652 became a member of the general court; and in 1657, when the government was restored to Lord Baltimore, he was appointed assistant governor. He returned to England in 1659, and died there in 1676.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Peyster, Johannes, 1600-1685 (search)
De Peyster, Johannes, 1600-1685 Founder of the De Peyster family; born in Haarlem, Holland, about 1600; emigrated to America on account of religious persecution, and died in New Amsterdam (now New York City) about 1685. De Peyster, Johannes, 1600-1685 Founder of the De Peyster family; born in Haarlem, Holland, about 1600; emigrated to America on account of religious persecution, and died in New Amsterdam (now New York City) about 1685.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), East India Company, the. (search)
East India Company, the. At the close of 1600, Queen Elizabeth granted a charter to a company of London merchants for the monopoly of the trade over a vast expanse of land and sea in the region of the East Indies, for fifteen years. The charter was renewed from time to time. The first squadron of the company (five vessels) sailed from Torbay (Feb. 15, 1601) and began to make footholds, speedily, on the islands and continental shores of the East, establishing factories in many places, and at length obtaining a grant (1698) from a native prince of Calcutta and two adjoining villages, with the privilege of erecting fortifications. This was the first step towards the acquirement by the company, under the auspices of the British government, of vast territorial possessions, with a population of 200,000,000, over which, in 1877, Queen Victoria was proclaimed empress. The company had ruled supreme in India, with some restrictions, until 1858, when the government of that Oriental emp
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gorges, Sir Ferdinando 1565-1647 (search)
Gorges, Sir Ferdinando 1565-1647 Colonial proprietor; born in Ashton Phillips, Somerset, England, about 1565; was associated with the courtiers of Queen Elizabeth; was engaged in the conspiracy of the Earl of Essex against the Queen's council (1600) ; and testified against him at his trial for treason (1601). Having served in the royal navy with distinction, he was appointed governor of Plymouth in 1604. A friend of Raleigh, he became imbued with that great man's desire to plant a colony in America, and when Captain Weymouth returned from the New England coast (1605), and brought captive natives with him, Gorges took three of them into his own home, from whom, after instructing them in the English language, he gained much information about their country. Gorges now became chiefly instrumental in forming the Plymouth Company (q. v.), to settle western Virginia, and from that time he was a very active member, defending its rights before Parliament, and stimulating by his own zeal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gorton, Samuel 1600-1677 (search)
Gorton, Samuel 1600-1677 Clergyman; born in England about 1600; was a clothier in London, and embarked for Boston in 1636, where he soon became entangled in teleological disputes and removed to Plymouth. There he preached such heterodox doctrines that he was banished as a heretic in the winter of 1637-38. With a few followers he went to Rhode Island, where he was publicly whipped for calling the magistrates just-asses, and other rebellious acts. In 1641 he was compelled to leave the isl1600; was a clothier in London, and embarked for Boston in 1636, where he soon became entangled in teleological disputes and removed to Plymouth. There he preached such heterodox doctrines that he was banished as a heretic in the winter of 1637-38. With a few followers he went to Rhode Island, where he was publicly whipped for calling the magistrates just-asses, and other rebellious acts. In 1641 he was compelled to leave the island. He took refuge with Roger Williams at Providence, but soon made himself so obnoxious there that he escaped public scorn by removing (1642) to a spot on the west side of Narraganset Bay, where he bought land of Miantonomoh and planted a settlement. The next year inferior sachems disputed his title to the land; and, calling upon Massachusetts to assist them, an armed force was sent to arrest Gorton and his followers, and a portion of them were taken to Boston and tried as damnable heretics.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hopkins, Edward 1600- (search)
Hopkins, Edward 1600- Statesman; born in Shrewsbury, England, in 1600; was a successful merchant in London, and, being much attached to John Davenport (q. v.), came with him to America, in 1637, and accompanied him to the banks of the Quinnipiac and assisted in the preliminary work of founding the New Haven colony. He went to Hartford, where he was chosen governor in 1639, and ruled the Connecticut colony from 1640 to 1654, alternately, every other year, with John Haynes (q. v.). On the de1600; was a successful merchant in London, and, being much attached to John Davenport (q. v.), came with him to America, in 1637, and accompanied him to the banks of the Quinnipiac and assisted in the preliminary work of founding the New Haven colony. He went to Hartford, where he was chosen governor in 1639, and ruled the Connecticut colony from 1640 to 1654, alternately, every other year, with John Haynes (q. v.). On the death of his elder brother, Mr. Hopkins returned to England, where he became warden of the fleet, commissioner of the admiralty, and member of Parliament. In 1643 Mr. Hopkins aided in forming the New England Confederacy, and he never lost his interest in the colonies. At his death, in London, March, 1657, he bequeathed much of his estate to New England institutions of learning—for the support of grammar schools in Hartford and New Haven, which are still kept up. He also left a donation of £ 500,
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