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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at New Market, Va., May 15, 1864. (search)
san Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; McClanahan's Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. In an address delivered at the anniversary celebration of the battle General Echols referred to the bravery of a company of Missourians who were in the battle. They were 70 in number, and, according to the Rockingham register of May 20th, 1864, they lost 47 in killed and wounded. The strength of Breckinridge's forces was about 5000. General Sigel, in an estimate based on the official reports, places Breckinridge's strength at 4816, as follows: Wharton's brigade, 1578; Echols's brigade, 1622; engineer co., 56; cadet corps, 227; company of Missourians, 70; Jackson's battery, 100; Chapman's battery, 135; Callahan's battery, 93; cadet's section, 35; Imboden's cavalry (not including the 62d Va., with Wharton), 900. The losses were 42 killed, 522 wounded, and 13 missing == 577. These figures include the losses of the cadet corps, which numbered 225, and sustained a loss of 8 killed and 46 wounded.
grants of the country of New England. The charters issued in those times show no knowledge of the country, for even its geographical boundaries by lakes and seas continually interlaced each other. Mason, a sea officer and prominent member of the council, obtained, in 1621, an immense tract extending from Salem on the sea around Cape Ann to the Merrimack River, and to the farthest head thereof, with all the islands lying within three miles of the coast. This grant was named Marianna. In 1622, another grant was made to Mason and Gorges of all the lands between the Merrimack and Sagadahoc, extending back to the Great Lakes and River of Canada. This grant was called Laconia. So little was known of the continent that it was supposed the River of Canada (the St. Lawrence) was within a hundred miles of the mouth of the Merrimack. It seems to be beyond dispute that this colony of Laconia was established by prominent merchants whose aim was to establish stations for fishing and carryi
ng our men may be employed in harbor, or upon the Bank. If you send ships to fish on the Bank, and expect them not to return again to the plantation, &c. By this it appears that those vessels which had caught a cargo of fish on the Bank were expected to take them thence to London. Sept. 3, 1635, the General Court chose a committee of six for setting forward and managing a fishing trade. That fishing was profitable, we have the following early record: Thirty-five ships sailed this year (1622) from the west of England, and two from London, to fish on the New England coasts; and made profitable voyages. Through the instrumentality of our fishing interest, the General Court passed the following order. May 22, 1639: For further encouragement of men to set upon fishing, it is ordered, that such ships and vessels and other stock as shall be properly employed and adventured in taking, making, and transporting of fish according to the course of fishing voyages, and the fish itself, sha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Newport's News. Nomen non Locus. (search)
case. It is worthy of being noted here, that not only the Virginia Authorities, but the Company in London, as early as 1622, put the first word (Newport) of the compound name in the possessive case. Such unanimity, on both sides of the ocean, between the two official bodies, plainly shows how well established the name Newport's News had become as early as 1622 (only fifteen years after the foundation of the Colony), and utterly forbids the idea that either of those bodies supposed Sir Willi the mode in which the name was uniformly spelled (viz., as Newport's News) in public official documents between the years 1622 and 1643; and it is to be noted that in none of the official documents of that period and later is the name ever spelled oling the name, and which will be found to correspond with the official mode. It seems [Neill's History, p. 394] that in 1622 one Captain Nathaniel Butler was sent out from England to the Colony as a kind of public inspector and censor, and in that
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Biard, Peter, 1565-1622 (search)
Biard, Peter, 1565-1622 Missionary; born in Grenoble, France, in 1565; came to America as a missionary priest of the Jesuits in 1611(; ascended the Kennebec River, and made friends with the natives in 1612; went up the Penobscot River and started a mission among the natives there in the following year; and soon afterwards founded a colony on \Mount Desert Island, which was destroyed by Samuel, Argall (q. v.). In this attack by the English Biard was taken prisoner, and the act was one of theamong the natives there in the following year; and soon afterwards founded a colony on \Mount Desert Island, which was destroyed by Samuel, Argall (q. v.). In this attack by the English Biard was taken prisoner, and the act was one of the earliest causes of the hostilities between the colonists in America from France and England. Father Biard was author of Relations de la nouvelle France, which was the first work in the historical series known as the Jesuit relations. He died in France in 1622.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canonicus (search)
Canonicus Indian chief; king of the Narragansets; born about 1565. He was at first unwilling to be friendly with the Pilgrims at New Plymouth. To show his contempt and defiance of the English, he sent a message to Governor Bradford with a bundle of arrows in a rattlesnake's skin. That was at the dead of winter, 1622. It was a challenge to engage in war in the spring. Like the venomous serpent that wore the skin, the symbol of hostility gave warning before the blow should be struckā€”a virtue seldom exercised by the Indians. Bradford acted wisely. He accepted the challenge by sending the significant quiver back filled with gunpowder and shot. What can these things be? inquired the ignorant and curious savage mind, as the ammunition was carried from village to village, in superstitious awe, as objects of evil omen. They had heard of the great guns at the sea-side, and they dared not keep the mysterious symbols of the governor's anger, but sent them back to Plymouth as token
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colonial settlements. (search)
1620 a company of English Puritans (Puritans) who had fled from persecution to Holland, crossed the Atlantic and landed on the shores of Massachusetts, by permission of the Plymouth Company (see Plymouth Company). They built a town and called it New Plymouth; they organized a civil government and called themselves Pilgrims. Others came to the shores of Massachusetts soon afterwards, and tile present foundations of the State of Massachusetts were laid at Plymouth in 1620 (Pilgrim fathers). In 1622 the Plymouth Company granted to Mason and Gorges a tract of land bounded by the rivers Merrimac and Kennebec, the ocean, and the St. Lawrence River, and fishermen settled there soon afterwards. Mason and Gorges dissolved their partnership in 1629, when the former obtained a grant for the whole tract, and laid the foundations for the commonwealth of New Hampshire (q. v.). King James of England persecuted the Roman Catholics in his dominions, and George Calvert, who was a zealous royalist,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Danforth, Thomas, 1622-1699 (search)
Danforth, Thomas, 1622-1699 Colonial governor; born in Suffolk, England, in 1622; settled in New England in 1634; was an assistant under the governor of Massachusetts in 1659-78; became deputy governor in 1679; during the same year was elected president of the province of Maine; and was also a judge of the Superior Court, in which capacity he strongly condemned the action of the court in the witchcraft excitement of 1692. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 5, 1699. Danforth, Thomas, 1622-1699 Colonial governor; born in Suffolk, England, in 1622; settled in New England in 1634; was an assistant under the governor of Massachusetts in 1659-78; became deputy governor in 1679; during the same year was elected president of the province of Maine; and was also a judge of the Superior Court, in which capacity he strongly condemned the action of the court in the witchcraft excitement of 1692. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 5, 1699.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fine Arts, the. (search)
ndeed, the discovery of the process of making pictures by employing sunlight as the artist was the result of the previous experiments and writings concerning the chemical action of light by Dr. Draper. The American Academy of Fine Arts was incorporated in 1808, and the first public exhibition of works of art followed. At the suggestion of Prof. Samuel F. B. Morse (q. v.) younger painters associated, and in 1826 organized the National Academy of the Arts of Design in the United States. In 1622 Edward Palmer, a native of Gloucestershire, England, obtained from the London Company a grant of land in Virginia, and from the Plymouth Company a tract in New England. Mr. Palmer died late in 1624. Just before his death he made provision in his will for the establishment, conditionally, of a university in Virginia, with which was to be connected a school of fine arts. His will, dated Nov. 22 (O. S.), 1624, provided for the descent of his lands in Virginia and New England to his sons and ne
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gorges, Sir Ferdinando 1565-1647 (search)
nother vessel, under Capt. Thomas Dermer (q. v.), prosecuted the voyage. Gorges sent out a party (1616), which encamped on the River Saco through the winter; and in 1619-20 Captain Dermer repeated the voyage. The new charter obtained by the company created such a despotic monopoly that it was strongly opposed in and out of Parliament, and was finally dissolved in 1635. Gorges had, meanwhile, prosecuted colonization schemes with vigor. With John Mason and others he obtained grants of land (1622), which now compose a part of Maine and New Hampshire, and settlements were attempted there. His son Robert was appointed general governor of the country, and a settlement was made (1624) on the site of York, Me. After the dissolution of the company (1635), Gorges, then a vigorous man of sixty years, was appointed (1637) governorgeneral of New England, with the powers of a palatine, and prepared to come to America, but was prevented by an accident to the ship in which he was to sail. He mad
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