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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 1 1 Browse Search
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River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north shore of the river, and therefore within the limits of Medford. The record concerning it is as follows: July 4, 1631. The governor built a bark at Mistick, which was launched this day, and called the blessing of the Bay. Aug. 9, the same year, the governor's bark, being of thirty tons, went to sea. It cost one hundred and forty-five pounds. The owner said of it, May 16, 1636, I will sell her for one hundred and sixty pounds. There was something singularly prophetic in the fact that the first vessel built at Mistick should have so increased in price after five years of service. Our day has seen the prophecy fulfilled; as it is no marvel now for a Medford ship to command a higher price after having had a fair trial at sea. The second year (1632) witnessed another vessel built by Mr. Cradock on the bank of the Mystic, whose register was a hundred tons. I
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25., Old ships and ship-building days of Medford. (search)
Old ships and ship-building days of Medford. Chapter 1: Early ships. in this article the names of Medford-built ships are italicized. IN the History of New England, by John Winthrop, is this record: July 4, 1631. The governor built a bark at Mistick which was launched this day, and called The Blessing of the Bay. Aug. 9th the same year, the the governor's bark, being of thirty tons, went to sea. It cost one hundred and forty-five pounds. The owner said of it, May 16, 1636, I will sell her for one hundred and sixty pounds. This is the first record of ship building in Medford, and there is a tradition that she was built on the north side of Mystic river, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. Brooks. History of Medford. The next year, 1632, Mr. Cradock built a vessel of one hundred tons, on the bank of the Mystic. In 1633, a ship of two hundred tons, and another named Rebecca, tonnage unknown; both built by Mr. Cradock. Brooks says, There is