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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Democracy in New Netherland. (search)
y chose twelve citizens to represent them. So appeared the first popular assembly, and so was chosen the first representative congress in New Netherland. It was a spontaneous outgrowth of the innate spirit of democracy that animated the people. The twelve were the vigorous seeds of that representative democracy which bore fruit in all the colonies more than a century later. Again, when the colony was threatened with destruction by the Indians, Kieft summoned the people into council (September, 1643), who chose eight men as the popular representatives to act with the governor in public affairs. Again when Gov. Peter Stuyvesant (q. v.) found the finances of the colony of New Netherland in such a wretched condition that taxation was necessary, he dared not tax the people without their consent, for fear of offending the States-General, so he called a convention of citizens, and directed them to choose eighteen of their best men, of whom he might select nine as representatives of th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
setts......1642 Dutch at Fort Orange seek in vain to ransom Jogues (a French missionary, prisoner of the Iroquois), but his life is spared......1642 Kieft rashly provokes an Indian war by sending soldiers to destroy the Indians at Pavonia and Corlear Hook......Feb. 25, 1643 Thus aroused, the Indians begin a war of retaliation......1643 They attack trading-vessels on the river......August, 1643 Capt. John Underhill, a hero of the Pequod War, enters the Dutch service......September, 1643 Anne Hutchinson killed, the settlement destroyed, and her granddaughter, eight years old, captured......1643 Throgmorton's settlement attacked and destroyed......1643 Gravesend, Long Island, attacked, but Indians repulsed......1643 Father Jogues escapes from the Indians at Fort Orange; is brought to New Amsterdam and sails for Europe......1643 English under Robert Fordham, from Stamford, settle Hempstead, Long Island......1644 English and Dutch destroy an Indian villag
does not appear that either of these officers was engaged in the short and decisive Pequot War, which occurred shortly after they were commissioned; Cambridge furnished twelve soldiers in this expedition; and Captain Patrick, who was an officer for the country's service and still resided here, had command of forty men from Massachusetts, but seems not to have arrived until after the principal battle ended.—Mass. Col. Rec., i. 197; and Coll. Mass. Hist. Soc., XVIII. 143, 144. but in September, 1643, but it was agreed that we should send three commissioners, with a guard of forty able men to attend them, which have authority and order to bring Samu: Gorton and his company, if they do not give them satisfaction. The three commissioners are Capt. George Cooke, Humfrey Atherton, and Edward Johnson; and Capt. Cooke to command in chief, and Hum: Atherton to be his Leift: of the military force. 1 Mass. Col. Rec., II. 44. In this expedition Thomas Parris of Cambridge served as surge
ce then prevailed, and continued, I believe, until the Revolution, for a Captain to retain the command of his company, however highly promoted, so long as he remained in office; thus Gookin, a Captain about 1647, continued to be Captain of his company while he was Sergeant-major, and Major-general, the immediate command being exercised by a Lieutenant; hence Green remained long in a subordinate office before he could attain high rank. He served as Sergeant in the expedition against Gorton Sept. 1643, and had probably held the same office previously; he was appointed Ensign in 1660; was Lieutenant in 1686; and was commissioned Captain in 1689, when seventy-five years old, which station he seems to have held until death. See page 402. In an obituary notice of his son Bartholomew, published in the News Letter, 4 Jan. 1733, it is stated that Capt. Samuel Green, the famous printer of Cambridge . . . . arrived with Gov. Winthrop in 1630; he came in the same ship with the Hon. Thomas Dudle
ce then prevailed, and continued, I believe, until the Revolution, for a Captain to retain the command of his company, however highly promoted, so long as he remained in office; thus Gookin, a Captain about 1647, continued to be Captain of his company while he was Sergeant-major, and Major-general, the immediate command being exercised by a Lieutenant; hence Green remained long in a subordinate office before he could attain high rank. He served as Sergeant in the expedition against Gorton Sept. 1643, and had probably held the same office previously; he was appointed Ensign in 1660; was Lieutenant in 1686; and was commissioned Captain in 1689, when seventy-five years old, which station he seems to have held until death. See page 402. In an obituary notice of his son Bartholomew, published in the News Letter, 4 Jan. 1733, it is stated that Capt. Samuel Green, the famous printer of Cambridge . . . . arrived with Gov. Winthrop in 1630; he came in the same ship with the Hon. Thomas Dudle