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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Democracy in New Netherland. (search)
at the town-hall in New Amsterdam, ostensibly to take measures to secure themselves from the depredations of the barbarians around them and sea-rovers. The governor tried in vain to control their action; they paid very little attention to his wishes or his commands. He stormed and threatened, but prudently yielded to the demands of the people that he should issue a call for another convention, and give legal sanction for the election of delegates thereto. These met in New Amsterdam on Dec. 10, 1653. Of the eight districts represented, four were Dutch and four English. Of the nineteen delegates, ten were of Dutch and nine were of English nativity. This was the first really representative assembly in the great State of New York chosen by the people. The names of the delegates were as follows: From New Amsterdam, Van Hattem, Kregier, and Van de Grist; from Breucklen (Brooklyn), Lubbertsen, Van der Beeck, and Beeckman; from Flushing, Hicks and Flake; from Newtown, Coe and Hazard; f
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Representative government. (search)
a few ignorant subjects. The deputies paid very little attention to the wishes or commands of the irate governor, who was an honest despot. When they adjourned they invited the governor to a collation, but he would not sanction their proceedings by his presence. They bluntly told him there would be another convention soon, and he might prevent it if he could. He stormed, but prudently yielded to the demands of the people for another convention, and issued a call. The delegates met (Dec. 10, 1653) in New Amsterdam. Of the eight districts represented, four were Dutch and four English. Of the nineteen delegates, ten were Dutch and nine English. Baxter, English secretary of the colony, led the English delegates. He drew up a remonstrance against the tyrannous rule of the governor. Stuyvesant met the severe document with his usual pluck, denouncing it and the Assembly, every member of which signed it; and until the end of his administration (1664) he was at swords' points with t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
ecall revoked......May 16, 1652 First public debt of New Amsterdam about 6,000 guilders......March 15, 1653 Dutch vessels excluded from New England harbors......1653 Landtdag (convention) at New Amsterdam......Dec. 8, 1653 Convention organized. New Amsterdam had three representatives; Breuckelen, three; Flushing, two; Newtown, two; Hempstead, two; Flatlands, three; Flatbush, two; Gravesend, two; four Dutch and four English towns sent ten Dutch and nine English delegates......Dec. 10, 1653 Governor dissolves the convention......Dec. 14, 1653 Pirates and robbers infest East River and plunder shores......1654 First church formed at Flatbush; Johannes Theodorus Polhemus dominie......1654 News of projected attack by the English received by Governor Stuyvesant......May 29, 1654 New Amsterdam put in a state of defence......June, 1654 Treaty of peace between England and Holland......1654 General thanksgiving day appointed......Aug. 12, 1654 Discovery of sa