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Plato, Republic, Book 5, section 474c (search)
leadership, while it befits the other sort to let philosophy alone and to follow their leader.” “It is high time,” he said, “to produce your definition.” “Come, then, follow me on this line, if we may in some fashion or other explain our meaning.” “Proceed,” he said. “Must I remind you, then,” said I, “or do you remember, that when we affirm that a man is a lover of something, it must be apparent that he is fond of all of it? It will not do to say that some of it he likes and someTO\ DE\ MH/: for the idiom Cf. Philebus 22 A, Laws 797 E, 923 C, Demodocus's epigram on the Chians, Aeschylus Persae 802, Sophocles O.C. 1671. does not.”“I think you will have to remind
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK III. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 24. (20.)—THE ALPS, AND THE ALPINE NATIONS. (search)
een upon the trophyThe trophy or triumphal arch which bore this inscription is that which was still to be seen at Torbia near Nicæa in Illyria, in the time of Gruter, who has given that portion of the inscription which remained unobliterated, down to "gentes Alpinæ," "the Alpine nations." Hardouin speaks of another triumphal arch in honour of Augustus at Segusio or Susa in Piedmont, which appears to have commenced in a somewhat similar manner, but only the first twelve words were remaining in 1671. erected on the Alps, which is to the following effect:—"To the Emperor Cæsar—The sonAdopted son of his great uncle Julius Cæsar. of Cæsar now deified, Augustus, Pontifex Maximus, and emperor fourteen years, in the seventeenthMost of the MSS. omit the figures XVII here, but it is evidently an accident; if indeed they were omitted in the original. year of his holding the tribuni- tial authority, the Senate and the Roman people, in remembrance that under his command and auspices all the Alpin
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 13: permanent fortifications.—Historical Notice of the progress of this Art.—Description of the several parts of a Fortress, and the various Methods of fortifying a position (search)
he Dutch were inferior in other military means, fortification became one of tie vital resources of the country. Their works, however, throw up in much haste, were in many respects defective, although well adapted to the exigencies of the time. Freytag, their principal engineer, wrote in 1630. Some of his improvements were introduced into France by Pagan. He was preceded by Marolois, (a cotemporary of Pagan,) who published in 1613. In Germany, Rimpler, a Saxon, wrote on fortification in 1671. He was a man of great experience, having served at the sieges of Candia, Phillipsburg, Bonn, Riga, Bremen, Dansburg, Bommeln, &c. He fell at the siege of Vienna in 1683. His writings are said to contain the groundwork of Montalembert's system. In Italy, after the time of Tartaglia, Marchi, Campi, &c., we find no great improvement in this art. Several Italians, however, distinguished themselves as engineers under the Spaniards. The fortifications of Badajos are a good example of the sta
utionary era and the Revolutionary spirit of our country were profoundly hostile to Slavery, and that they were not content with mere protests against an evil which positive efforts, determined acts, were required to remove. Before the Revolution, in deed, a religious opposition to Slavery, whereof the society of Christian Friends or Quakers were the pioneers, had been developed both in the mother country and in her colonies. George Fox, the first Quaker, bore earnest testimony, so early as 1671, on the occasion of his visit to Barbadoes, against the prevalent cruelty and inhumanity with which negro slaves were then treated in that island, and urged their gradual emancipation. His letter implies that some of his disciples were slaveholders. Yet it was not till 1727 that the yearly meeting of the whole society in London declared the importing of negroes from their native country and relations, by Friends, not a commendable or allowable practice. Nearly thirty years before, the year
, that our Puritan Fathers believed that the establishment of schools was a duty they owed to justice and humanity, to freedom and religion; and, second, that they had resolved that these schools should be free. Here, then, was a new idea introduced to the world,--free schools! And, from free schools and congregational churches, what could result but republicanism? They held our republic as the.acorn holds the oak. It is important to state that free schools originated in Massachusetts. In 1671, Sir William Berkeley, first Governor of Virginia, writes to the king thus:-- I thank God there are no free schools nor printing-presses here, and I trust there will not be this hundred years; for learning breeds up heresies and sects and all abominations. God save us from both! Now look at Massachusetts. The Rev. John Robinson, before the Pilgrims left Leyden, charged them to build churches, establish schools, and read the Bible without sectarian prejudice. He said, I am convinced t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 (search)
Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 Military officer; born in Ireland, about 1671; in 1712, with a regiment of 600 Carolinians and several hundred friendly Indians, killed 300 of the warring Tuscaroras in the first engagement and drove the survivors into their fortified town, where they were finally reduced to submission. Over 1,000 of them were killed or captured, and the remnant joined the Five Nations of New York. He died in Beaufort, S. C., in 1724. Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 Military officer; born in Ireland, about 1671; in 1712, with a regiment of 600 Carolinians and several hundred friendly Indians, killed 300 of the warring Tuscaroras in the first engagement and drove the survivors into their fortified town, where they were finally reduced to submission. Over 1,000 of them were killed or captured, and the remnant joined the Five Nations of New York. He died in Beaufort, S. C., in 1724.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dablon, Claude, 1618-1697 (search)
Dablon, Claude, 1618-1697 Jesuit missionary; born in Dieppe, France, in 1618; began a mission to the Onondaga Indians in New York in 1655, and six years afterwards he accompanied Druillettes in an overland journey to the Hudson Bay region. In 1668 he went with Marquette to Lake Superior, and in 1670 was appointed superior of the missions of the Upper Lakes. He prepared the Relations concerning New France for 1671-72, and also a narrative of Marquette's journey, published in John Gilmary Shea's Discovery and exploration of the Mississippi Valley (1853). He died in Quebec, Canada, Sept. 20; 1697.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), James ii., 1633-1671 (search)
James ii., 1633-1671 King of England; born in St. James's Palace, London, Oct. 14, 1633; son of Charles I. and Henrietta Maria. During the civil war, in which his father lost his head, James and his brother Gloucester and sister Elizabeth were under the guardianship of the Duke of Northumberland, and lived in the palace. Wniards. His brother ascended the British throne in 1660 as Charles ii., and the same year James married Anne Hyde, daughter of the Earl of Clarendon. She died in 1671, and two years afterwards, James married Maria Beatrice Eleanor, a princess of the House of Este, of Modena, twenty-five years younger than himself. While in exile James had become a Roman Catholic, but did not acknowledge it until 1671. He had become a commander in the British navy, but the test-act of 1673 caused him to leave all public employments. Being sent to Scotland as head of the administration there, he treated the Covenanters with great cruelty. When Charles died, James becam
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jesuit missions. (search)
in October, 1668, where he remained a few years. Pierre Rafeix, at Onondaga from 1656 to 1658; chaplain in Courcelle's expedition in 1665; sent to the Cayugas in 1671, thence to Seneca, where he was in 1679. Jacques Bruyas, sent to the Mohawks, July, 1667, and to the Oneidas in September, where he spent four years, and thence returned to the Mohawks in 1672; was at Onondaga in 1679, 1700, and 1701. Etienne de Carheil, sent to Cayuga in 1668, and was absent in 1671-72; returned, and remained until 1684. Pierre Milet was sent with De Carheil to the Cayugas in 1668, and left in 1684; was at Niagara in 1688, and was taken prisoner at Cataraqua in 1689. Jee Mohawks in July, 1667: went among the Cayugas in October, 1668, and was with the Senecas after 1672, where he was in 1679. Jean de Lamberville was at Onondaga in 1671-72; was sent to Niagara in 1687. Francis Boniface was sent to the Mohawks in 1668, and was there after 1673. Francis Vaillant de Gueslis succeeded Boniface among
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Josselyn, John 1638- (search)
Josselyn, John 1638- Author; born in England early in the seventeenth century; travelled in America in 1638-39 and 1663-71. He is the author of New England's rarities discovered; An account of two voyages to New England, etc.
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