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P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), A Note on the Translations (search)
The Amores here are taken from a collection called Miscellany Poems (or Dryden's Miscellany), published as a series by Jacob Tonson from 1684 on. These translations were reprinted several times in England and the US through the 18th and 19th c.. The other poets represented here were all colleagues of Dryden's, from the group of "Court Poets" of the Restoration. Thomas Creech, 1659-1700, published translations of various classical authors as well as original poems. He is best known for his 1682 translation of Lucretius. Henry Cromwell, b. 1659, was a cousin of the Protector Oliver Cromwell and a friend of Alexander Pope. Richard Duke, 1658-1711, joined with Dryden and other poets in a translation of the satires of Juvenal and Persius. Laurence Eusden, 1688-1730, became Poet Laureate in 1718. He was one of the translators in the joint edition of the Metamorphoses published in 1751 and now known as "Garth's Metamorphoses." Charles Hopkins, 1664-1700, published The History of Love — A
ermopylae of Texas. its fall. Fannin's massacre. Santa Anna's advance. Houston's retreat. conduct and character of Houston. movements of the armies. battle of San Jacinto. Santa Anna's personal danger. his secret treaty and release; sympathy for Texas in the United States. Houston elected President. Albert Sidney Johnston joins in the Texan Revolution. his motives. On February 18, 1685, the adventurous La Salle, looking for a mouth of the Mississippi, which he had discovered in 1682, landed in Matagorda Bay. Six miles up the Lavaca River he built Fort St. Louis. This was the first settlement in Texas. Two years afterward, in attempting to pass by land from Lavaca to the French colony in Illinois, he was murdered near the river Neches by his own men; and in a few years the little post on the Lavaca was destroyed by disease, Indian assaults, and Spanish hostility. The claim to this territory was disputed between France and Spain, but the latter power practically settled
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 1: ancestry. (search)
ratified in the same manner as with a foreign power. Berkeley was then removed and another governor appointed; but the undaunted Colonel Richard Lee hired a Dutch vessel, freighted it himself, went to Brussels or Breda, surrendered up Sir William Berkeley's old commission — for the government of that province-and received a new one from his present Majesty, Charles II, a loyal action and deserving my commendation. Introductis ad Latinum Blasoniam. By John Gibbons, Blue Man-tel, London, 1682. It is also said that he offered the exiled monarch an asylum in the New World. It is certain that on the death of Cromwell he aided Governor Berkeley in proclaiming Charles II in Virginia King of England, Scotland, France, Ireland, and Virginia two years before his restoration in England. In consequence, the motto to the Virginia Coat of Arms was En dat Virginia quintam until after the union of England and Scotland, when it was En dat Virginia quartam. The inscription on the tombstone
o on either side of its mouth. But the French--now firmly established in Canada, and penetrating by their traders and voyageurs the wild region stretching westward and south-westward from that Colony — obtained from the savages some account of this river about the year 1660; and in 1673, Marquette and Joliet, proceeding westward from Montreal, through the Great Lakes, reached the Mississippi above its junction with the Missouri, and descended it to within three days journey of its mouth. In 1682, La Salle descended it to the Gulf of Mexico, and took formal possession of the region in the name of his king and country. A fort was erected on its banks by Iberville, about the year 1699; and in 1703, a settlement was made at St. Peters, on the Yazoo. New Orleans was first chosen as the site of a city in 1717, laid out in 1718, when the levees which protect it from the annual inundations of the river were immediately commenced, and steadily prosecuted to completion, ten years afterward.
ht of Richard Russell350 acres. 1679, Nov. 16.Bought of A. Shadwell32 acres. 1681, Sept. 20.Bought of S. Rowse32 acres. 1682, Feb. 3.Bought of John Green6 acres. 1682, May 18.Bought of Alexander Stewart11 acres. 1682, May 29.Bought of M. Dady10 1682, May 18.Bought of Alexander Stewart11 acres. 1682, May 29.Bought of M. Dady10 acres. 1682, Dec. 22.Bought of L. Hamond8 1/4 acres. 1684, June 8.Bought of Christopher Goodwin16 acres. 1684, Dec. 13.Bought of Isaac Johnson1 cow-common. 1685, June 20.Bought of Wm. Dady3 cow-commons. 1687, April 21.Bought of Wm. Dady3 acres. 1682, May 29.Bought of M. Dady10 acres. 1682, Dec. 22.Bought of L. Hamond8 1/4 acres. 1684, June 8.Bought of Christopher Goodwin16 acres. 1684, Dec. 13.Bought of Isaac Johnson1 cow-common. 1685, June 20.Bought of Wm. Dady3 cow-commons. 1687, April 21.Bought of Wm. Dady3 acres. 1691, Oct. 5.Bought of Wm. Dady4 cow-commons. 1693, Aug. 20.Bought of J. Frost10 1/2 acres. 1694, May 17.Bought of J. Lynde8 3/4 acres. 1694, May 18.Bought of T. Crosswell3 acres. 1694, May 31.Bought of J. Phipps10 1/2 acres. 1694, Aug. 23.Boug1682, Dec. 22.Bought of L. Hamond8 1/4 acres. 1684, June 8.Bought of Christopher Goodwin16 acres. 1684, Dec. 13.Bought of Isaac Johnson1 cow-common. 1685, June 20.Bought of Wm. Dady3 cow-commons. 1687, April 21.Bought of Wm. Dady3 acres. 1691, Oct. 5.Bought of Wm. Dady4 cow-commons. 1693, Aug. 20.Bought of J. Frost10 1/2 acres. 1694, May 17.Bought of J. Lynde8 3/4 acres. 1694, May 18.Bought of T. Crosswell3 acres. 1694, May 31.Bought of J. Phipps10 1/2 acres. 1694, Aug. 23.Bought of W. Dady2 acres. 1695, April 23.Bought of J. Newell10 1/2 acres. 1696, Nov. 3.Bought of John Melvin7 3/4 acres. 1696, Dec. 8.Bought of John Cary (Walnut Tree Hill)3 1/2 acres. 1697, April 15.Bought of Timothy Goodwinthree pieces. 1697, May
25, 1747; m. Hannah Breed, Nov. 1, 1786, who was b. Dec. 28, 1747; and had--  1-2Mary, b. Sept. 12, 1787.  3Lucy, b. Apr. 8, 1789; d. Apr. 22, 1789.  4Lucy, b. June 17, 1791.  5David, b. Dec. 23, 1793; m. Mary Ann Elder.   Parker, Benjamin, who d. Oct. 26, 1761, m. Mary Willis, Apr. 22, 1714. She d. Aug. 20, 1763.  1Patch, Thomas, came from Somersetshire, England, and settled in Wenham, Mass. He had six sons, as given below; and two daughters, names unknown.  1-2Thomas.  3Isaac, b. 1682.  4Ephraim.  5Timothy.  6Stephen.  7Simon. 1-3Isaac Patch m. Edith Edwards, and lived in Newton, afterwards in Concord, and lastly in Groton, where he d., July 12, 1762, aged 80. His wife survived him, and d. aged about 100 years. His children were--  3-8Lois.  9Sarah.  10Thomas.  11Lydia.  12Isaac.  13Edith.  14Ebenezer.  15Lois.  16Ephraim.  17Mary. 3-14Ebenezer Patch m. Sarah, dau. of Jacob Wright, in 1746. He had fourteen children, eight of whom died youn
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, (search)
s in population according to the census of 1900; on the Patapsco River; 38 miles northeast of Washington, D. C. The city covers an area of 28 square miles; has an admirable harbor defended by Fort McHenry (see McHenry, Fort); and is popularly known as The Monumental City. Baltimore has a history dating back to 1662, when its site was included in a patent for a tract of land granted to Charles Gorsuch. David Jones, the first settler on the A view of Baltimore to-day. site of Baltimore, in 1682, gave his name to a small stream that runs through the city. In January, 1730, a town was laid out on the west of this stream, contained in a plot of 60 acres, and was called Baltimore, in honor of Cecil, Lord Baltimore. In the same year William Fell, a ship-carpenter, purchased a tract east of the stream and called it Fell's Point, on the extremity of which Fort McHenry now stands. In 1732 a new town of 10 acres was laid out on the east side of the stream, and called Jonestown. It was un
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barclay, Robert, 1648-1690 (search)
published, in Latin and English, An apology for the true Christian Divinity, as the same is held forth and preached by the people called, in scorn, Quakers. Barclay dedicated it to King Charles, with great modesty and independence, and it was one of the ablest defences of the doctrines of his sect. His writings attracted public sympathy to his co-religionists. The first remonstrance of Friends against war was put forth by Barclay in 1677, entitled a Treatise on universal love. Barclay made many religious journeys in England, Holland, and Germany with William Penn, and was several times imprisoned on account of the promulgation of his doctrines. Charles II. was Barclay's friend through the influence of Penn, and made his estate at Ury a free barony in 1679, with the privilege of criminal jurisdiction. He was one of the proprietors of East Jersey, and in 1682 he was appointed its governor (see New Jersey) ; but he exercised the office by a deputy. He died in Ury, Oct. 13, 1690.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barre, Antoine Le Fevre De La, (search)
Barre, Antoine Le Fevre De La, French general and author; born about 1605; was appointed lieutenant-general of the army in 1667, and sent against the English in the West Indies. After a successful campaign he was appointed governor of Canada in 1682, and held the office for three years. In 1684 he prepared for an expedition from Canada to the country of the five Nations (q. v.). His forces consisted of 700 Canadians, 130 regular soldiers, and 200 Indians. Detained, by an epidemic disease among the French soldiers, at Fort Frontenac for six weeks, he was compelled to conclude the campaign with a treaty. He crossed Lake Ontario for that purpose, and at a designated place was met by Oneidas, Onondagas, and Cayugas, the Mohawks and Senecas refusing to attend. Barre assumed much dignity. Seated on a chair of state, with his French and Indian officers forming a circle around him, he addressed himself to Garangula, the Onondaga chief, in a very haughty speech, which he concluded wit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bradford, William, 1588-1657 (search)
succeeded John Carver (April 5, 1621) as governor of Plymouth colony. He cultivated friendly relations with the Indians; and he was annually rechosen governor as long as he lived, excepting in five years. He wrote a history of Plymouth colony from 1620 to 1647, which was published by the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1856. He died in Plymouth, Mass., May 9, 1657. printer; born in Leicester, England, in 1658. A Friend, or Quaker, he came to America with Penn's early colonists in 1682. and landed near the spot where Philadelphia was afterwards built. He had learned the printer's trade in London, and, in 1686, he printed an almanac in Philadelphia. Mixed up in a political and social dispute in Pennsylvania, and suffering thereby, he removed to New York in 1693, and in that year printed the laws of that colony. He began the first newspaper in New York. Oct. 16, 1725--the New York gazette. He was printer to the government of New York more than fifty years, and for thirt
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