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er Goodwin16 acres. 1684, Dec. 13.Bought of Isaac Johnson1 cow-common. 1685, June 20.Bought of Wm. Dady3 cow-commons. 1687, April 21.Bought of Wm. Dady3 acres. 1691, Oct. 5.Bought of Wm. Dady4 cow-commons. 1693, Aug. 20.Bought of J. Frost10 1/2 acres. 1694, May 17.Bought of J. Lynde8 3/4 acres. 1694, May 18.Bought of T. Croohn Blaney7 acres.    Including the cow-commons, about835 acres. During this time, they sold as follows:-- 1680, Jan. 30.To S. Grove, in Malden20 acres. 1691, Feb. 22.To Jonathan Tufts, brick-yards39 acres. 1697, Jan. 10.To Jonathan Wade, in Medford12 1/2 acres. Mr. Peter Tufts, born in England, 1617, was the fathdlesex, ss.--At the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, holden at Charlestown, Jan. 23, 1694. Whereas, there was an order of the General Court, in the year 1691, referring to the settlement of Mistick Bridge to the County Court of Middlesex, the said Court ordering the repairing of said bridge to be by the respective towns
casion. As the history of this gentleman's ministerial connection with the town of Medford will let us into some clear knowledge, not only of the taste and temper of our ancestors, but of their faith and wisdom, we shall here give a few details. Mr. Woodbridge was the son of Rev. John Woodbridge, of Andover. He was ordained, March 18, 1670, over the Presbyterian party in Windsor, Conn. He left Windsor, and preached at Bristol, R. I. He left Bristol, and preached at Kittery, Maine. In 1691, he resided in Portsmouth, N. H. In 1698, lie began to officiate in Medford. The subject of the church and the ministry being the paramount topic in our early times, we may not wonder if we find in it traditional enthusiasm and Protestant Popery. Our fathers found some ministers to be mere church-clocks, for ticking the seconds and striking the hours; but whether they found Mr. Woodbridge such a one, or a whip of fire, the following history will disclose. He seemed to preach so accepta
first settlers of Medford for the burial of the dead are not positively known. Whether from unwillingness to follow England's example, in providing expensive and well-secured graveyards, or from their inability to do so, we cannot say; but the fact is clear, that such provisions for the dead were not made. The oldest gravestones in the present graveyard, near Gravelly Bridge, were brought from England, and are remarkable for their width, thickness, and weight. The oldest bears the date of 1691. It may be that some of our gardens are cemeteries, and that from human soil we gather our daily bread, while the spade and ploughshare lacerate the relics of our ancestors. March 20, 1705: Put to vote, whether the selectmen shall discourse Mr. Dudley Wade, referring to the proposals made this meeting by Stephen Willis, jun., in said Wade's behalf, respecting the burying-place in Medford, and make return thereof to the town at the next town's meeting. Voted in the affirmative. It doe
es, at Maresfield, in the county of Sussex, some seventy miles from London. It is believed that the only persons now living of that name can be traced back to this common stock. In England, the most distinguished bearer of this name was Richard Kidder, Bishop of Bath and Wells. He was born in 1633, at East Grinstead, the birthplace of the American emigrant, whose kinsman he was. He was Rector of St. Martin's, London; Prebend of Norwich, 1681; Dean of Peterborough, 1689; and Bishop of Bath, 1691. He was killed, during the great gale of Nov. 27, 1703, by the fall of a chimney on the bishop's palace at Wells, which crushed him and his wife while at prayers. His daughter, Ann, died unmarried; and her only sister, Susanna, married Sir Richard Everard, one of the early governors of South Carolina, and has numerous descendants alive in that State. The pedigree of the American branch, in the direct line, is: Richard Kidder (1) was living at Maresfield, 1492; his son, Richard (2), d. 15
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
Maryland in 1675. He was born in London in 1629; appointed governor of Maryland in 1661; and married the daughter of Hon. Henry Sewall, whose seat was on the Patuxent river. After the death of his father he visited England, but soon returned. In 1684 he again went to England, and never came back. He was suspected of favoring King James II, after the Revolution, and was outlawed for treason in Ireland, although he was never in that country. The outlawry was reversed by William and Mary in 1691. Charles Lord Baltimore was thrice married, and died in London, Feb. 24, 1714. Iv. Benedict Leonard Calvert, fourth Lord Baltimore, Succeeded his father, Charles, in 1714. In 1698 he married Lady Charlotte Lee, daughter of the Earl of Lichfield (granddaughter of the notorious Duchess of Cleveland, the favorite mistress of Charles II.), from whom he was divorced in 1705. Benedict publicly abjured the Roman Catholic faith in 1713, and died in 1715, only thirteen months after the death
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bills of credit. (search)
xes, and redeemable out of any money in the treasury. The total amount of this paper currency issued was a little more than $133,000; but long before that limit was reached the bills depreciated onehalf. The General Court revived their credit in 1691, by making them a legal tender in all payments. The first issue was in February. 1691, though the bills were dated 1690--the year, according to the calendar then in use, not beginning until March. When an expedition for the conquest of Canada1691, though the bills were dated 1690--the year, according to the calendar then in use, not beginning until March. When an expedition for the conquest of Canada was determined on in 1711, the credit of the English treasury, exhausted by costly wars, was so low at Boston that nobody would purchase bills upon it without an endorsement, which Massachusetts furnished in the form of bills of credit to the amount of about $200,000, advanced to the merchants who supplied the fleet with provisions. The province issued paper money to the amount of about $50,000 to meet its share of the expenses of the proposed expedition. After the affair at Lexington and Con
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clap, Roger 1609-1691 (search)
Clap, Roger 1609-1691 Pioneer; born in Salcomb, England, April, 1609; settled in Dorchester, Mass., with Maverick and others in 1630; was representative of the town in 1652-66, and also held a number of military and civil offices. In 1665-86 he was captain of Castle William. He wrote a memorial of the New England worthies, and other Memoirs, which were first published in 1731 by Rev. Thomas Prince, and later republished by the Historical Society of Dorchester. He died in Boston, Mass., Feb. 2, 1691.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Democracy in New Netherland. (search)
quiet for a while. After the death of Bellomont (March 5, 1701), John Nanfan, his lieutenant, ruled for a while. Nanfan favored the democratic party. As soon as it was known that Lord Cornbury (q. v.), a thorough aristocrat and royalist, had been appointed governor, Bayard and his party heaped abuse not only upon the dead Bellomont, but upon Nanfan. The latter saw that Bayard was on the verge of a pit which he had digged himself, and he pushed him into it. Bayard had procured an act, in 1691, aimed at Leisler and his supporters, providing that any person who should in any manner endeavor to disturb the government of the colony should be deemed rebels and traitors unto their majesties, and should incur the pains and penalties of the laws of England for such offence. Bayard was arrested on a charge of treason, tried, convicted, and received the horrid sentence then imposed by the English law upon traitors—to be hanged, quartered, etc. Bayard applied for a reprieve until his Majest
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Peyster, Abraham, 1658-1728 (search)
De Peyster, Abraham, 1658-1728 Jurist; born in New Amsterdam (New York), July 8, 1658; eldest son of Johannes De Peyster, a noted merchant of his day. Between 1691 and 1695 he was mayor of the city of New York; was first assistant justice and then chief-justice of New York, and was one of the King's council under Governor Hyde (afterwards Lord Cornbury), and as its president was acting-governor for a time in 1701. Judge De Peyster was colonel of the forces in New York and treasurer of that province and New Jersey. He was a personal friend and correspondent of William Penn. Having amassed considerable wealth, he built a fine mansion, which stood, until 1856, in Pearl street. It was used by Washington as his headquarters for a while in 1776. He died in New York City Aug. 10, 1728.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fairfax, Thomas 1691-1781 (search)
Fairfax, Thomas 1691-1781 Sixth Baron of Cameron; born in England in 1691; educated at Oxford; was a contributor to Addison's Spectator, and finally, soured by disappointments, quitted England forever, and settled on the vast landed estate in Virginia which he had inherited from his mother, daughter of Lord Culpeper. He built a lodge in the midst of 10,000 acres of land, some of it arable and excellent for grazing, where he resolved to build a fine mansion and live a sort of Thomas Fair1691; educated at Oxford; was a contributor to Addison's Spectator, and finally, soured by disappointments, quitted England forever, and settled on the vast landed estate in Virginia which he had inherited from his mother, daughter of Lord Culpeper. He built a lodge in the midst of 10,000 acres of land, some of it arable and excellent for grazing, where he resolved to build a fine mansion and live a sort of Thomas Fairfax. hermit lord of a vast domain. He was at middle age when he came to America. He never built the great mansion, but lived a solitary life in the lodge he had built, which he called Greenway Court. There Washington first met him and became a frequent visitor, for Fairfax found him a bright young man, a good hunter, in Greenway Court. which sport he himself loved to engage, and useful to him as a surveyor of his lands. He became very fond of the young surveyor, who was a loved companion
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