Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1711 AD or search for 1711 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smith, Robert 1757-1842 (search)
Smith, Robert 1757-1842 Statesman; born in Lancaster, Pa., in November, 1757; graduated at Princeton College in 1781. During the Revolutionary War he participated in the battle of Brandywine as a volunteer; was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates in 1796-1800; Secretary of the Navy in 1802-5; United States Attorney-General in 1805-9; and Secretary of State in 1809-11. He died in Baltimore, Md., Nov. 26, 1842.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Teganissorens, 1693-1711 (search)
Teganissorens, 1693-1711 An Iroquois Indian chief; born in Onondaga, N. Y.; became a strong ally of the French; was converted to Christianity in 1693; and in the following year visited Frontenac, the French governor, to whom he proposed the rehabilitation of Fort Catarocouy (Kingston), which appeared to Frontenac as a wise poed both English and French agents, to whom he declared that he would remain neutral, and thereafter strongly protested against attacks on the English settlers. In 1711 he gave information to the French that preparations were being made in New York, Boston, and Albany for the invasion of Canada. He died in Caughnawaga, or Sault Srench agents, to whom he declared that he would remain neutral, and thereafter strongly protested against attacks on the English settlers. In 1711 he gave information to the French that preparations were being made in New York, Boston, and Albany for the invasion of Canada. He died in Caughnawaga, or Sault St. Louis, after 1711.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tucker, Josiah 1711-1799 (search)
Tucker, Josiah 1711-1799 Clergyman; born in Laugharne, Wales, in 1711; educated at Oxford, he took orders, and was for many years a rector in Bristol; in 1758 he was Dean of Gloucester; he was a prolific writer on political and religious subjects, and published several tracts on the dispute between Great Britain and the American colonies, which attracted much attention. The British ministry knew more of the differences of opinion in the Continental Congress than did the Americans, for G1711; educated at Oxford, he took orders, and was for many years a rector in Bristol; in 1758 he was Dean of Gloucester; he was a prolific writer on political and religious subjects, and published several tracts on the dispute between Great Britain and the American colonies, which attracted much attention. The British ministry knew more of the differences of opinion in the Continental Congress than did the Americans, for Galloway had let out the secret to friends of the crown. This fact encouraged Lord Seal and signature of Tryon. North and his colleagues to believe that a little firmness on the part of Great Britain would shake the resolution and break up the apparent union of the colonists. It was known that a large portion of the most respectable and influential of the inhabitants of the colonies were warmly attached to the mother-country. In several colonies there was a strong prejudice felt towards New
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tuscarora Indians, (search)
Tuscarora Indians, A tribe of the Iroquois Confederacy, who were separated from their kindred at an early day, and were seated in North Carolina when the Europeans came. They were divided into seven clans, and at the beginning of the eighteenth century occupied fifteen villages and had 1,200 warriors. They attempted to exterminate the white people in North Carolina in 1711, but troops that came to the aid of the assailed from South Carolina chastised them in a battle fought near the Neuse (Jan. 28, 1712), killing and wounding 400 of them. They made peace, but soon broke it. At war again in 1713, they were subdued by Colonel Moore, of South Carolina, at their fort near Snow-hill (March 20), who captured 800 of them. The remaining Tuscaroras fled northward, and joined their kindred of the Iroquois Confederacy, constituting the sixth nation of that league. In 1899 there were 388 Tuscaroras at the New York agency.
, a village a few miles above Kaskaskia......1719 Pierre Duque Boisbriant, sent by the Western Company, builds Fort Chartres on the east side of the Mississippi, 22 miles from Kaskaskia......1720 Jesuits establish a monastery and college at Kaskaskia......1721 Kaskaskia becomes an incorporated town......1725 Renault sells his slaves to the French colonists in Illinois......1744 Fort Massac, or Massacre, on the Ohio, about 40 miles from its mouth, established by the French about 1711, is enlarged and garrisoned......1756 British flag raised over Fort Chartres......Oct. 10, 1765 Colonel Wilkins, sent to Fort Chartres to govern the Illinois country, assumes by proclamation the civil administration, appointing seven magistrates or judges......Nov. 21, 1768 First court held in Illinois opens at Fort Chartres......Dec. 6, 1768 Land grant of 30,000 acres in the present county of Randolph made by Colonel Wilkins to John Baynton, Samuel Wharton, and George Morgan, me
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Rensselaer, Stephen 1765-1839 (search)
Van Rensselaer, Stephen 1765-1839 Last of the patroons; born in New York, Nov. 1, 1765; son of Nicholas Van Rensselaer; married a daughter of Gen. Philip Stephen Van Rensselaer. Schuyler in 1783. In 1789 he was a member of the legislature, and State Senator from 1790 to 1795. From 1795 to 1801 he was lieutenant-governor. He presided over the constitutional convention in 1801, and in 1810-11 was one of the commissioners to ascertain the feasibility of a canal to connect the waters of the lakes with the Hudson. From 1816 until his death he was one of the canal commissioners, and for fifteen years president of the board. In 1801 he commanded the State cavalry, with the rank of major-general; and when the War of 1812-15 broke out was chief of the New York State militia. In 1819 he was elected a regent of the State University, and afterwards its chancellor. In 1820 he was president of the State agricultural board, a member of the constitutional convention in 1821, and of Congr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Walker, Sir Hovenden 1660- (search)
Walker, Sir Hovenden 1660- Military officer; born in Somersetshire, England, about 1660; became a captain in the navy in 1692, and rear-admiral of the white in 1710. The next year he was knighted by Queen Anne. He made an attempt to capture Quebec in 1711, commanding the naval armament sent for that purpose (see Quebec). Returning to England, his ship, the Edgar, blew up at Spithead, when nearly all the crew perished. This accident and the disastrous expedition to Quebec drew upon him almost unqualified censure, and he was dismissed from the service. He afterwards settled upon a plantation in South Carolina; but returned to Great Britain, and died of a broken heart in Dublin, Ireland, in January, 1726.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wheelock, Eleazar 1711-1779 (search)
Wheelock, Eleazar 1711-1779 Educator; born in Windham, Conn., April 22, 1711; graduated at Yale College in 1733; was pastor of a Congregational church at Lebanon, Conn., in 1735, and remained there thirty-five years. He opened a school there in 1754, in which was a bright Indian pupil, Samson Occum. His proficiency led to the establishment of Moore's Indian School, which eventually became Dartmouth College, of which Dr. Wheelock was the first president. He died in Hanover, N. H., April 24, 1779.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, John 1664-1729 (search)
March 1, 1704, and among the inhabitants carried into captivity were Mr. Williams and a part of his family. Two of his children and a black servant were murdered at his door. With his wife and five children he began the toilsome journey towards Canada through the deep snow. On the second day his wife, weak from the effects of recent childbirth, fainted with fatigue, when the tomahawk of her captor cleaved her skull, and so he was relieved of the burden. Her husband and children were taken to Canada, and, after a captivity of nearly two years among the Caughnawaga Indians near Montreal, they were ransomed and returned home, excepting a daughter Eunice (q. v.), whom the Indians refused to part with. After the return of Mr. Williams to Deerfield in 1706 he resumed the charge of his congregation. He married a daughter of Captain Allen, of Connecticut, and in 1711 was appointed a commissary under Colonel Stoddard in the expedition against Canada. He died in Deerfield, June 12, 1729.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wolcott, Roger 1679-1767 (search)
Wolcott, Roger 1679-1767 Colonial governor; born in Windsor, Conn., Jan. 4, 1679; was apprenticed to a mechanic at the age of twelve years. By industry and economy he afterwards acquired a competent fortune. In the expedition against Canada in 1711 he was commissary of the Connecticut forces, and had risen to major-general in 1745, when he was second in command at the capture of Louisburg. He was afterwards, successively, a legislator, county judge, chief-justice of the Supreme Court, and governor (1751-54). In 1725 he published Poetical Meditations, and he left a long manuscript poem descriptive of the Pequod War, which is preserved in the collections of the Connecticut Historical Society. He died in Windsor, Conn., May 17, 1767.
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