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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 34 34 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 17 17 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 13 13 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 23, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 23, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1711 AD or search for 1711 AD in all documents.

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frica for negroes, with such limits as should be prescribed by Parliament." Under William III., an act was passed partially relaxing the monopoly, the preamble to which states that the trade was highly beneficial and advantageous to the kingdom, and to the plantations and colonies thereunto belonging." In 1708, the Commons, still importuned by the merchants, again resolved "That the trade was important, and ought to be free and open to all the Queen's subjects trading from Great Britain." In 1711, they again resolved "That this trade ought to be free in a regulated company; the plantations ought to be supplied with negroes at a reasonable rate; a considerable stock was necessary for carrying on the trade to the best advantage, and that an export of £100,000 at least, in merchandise, should be annually made from Great Britain to Africa. " At last, the popular complaints completely prevailed in the passage of an act, under George II., throwing open the trade, and declaring "the slave tr