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The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaty of Aix-la-chapelle, (search)
Treaty of Aix-la-chapelle, A treaty between Great Britain, France, Holland, Germany, Spain, and Greece; signed by the representatives of these respective powers on Oct. 18 (N. S.), 1748. By it the treaties of Westphalia (1648), of Nimeguen (1678-79), of Ryswick (1697), of Utrecht (1713), of Baden (1714), of the Triple Alliance (1717), of the Quadruple Alliance (1718), and of Vienna (1738), were renewed and confirmed. It was fondly hoped this treaty would insure a permanent peace for Europe. It was, however, only a truce between France and England, contending for dominion in America. The English regarded as encroachments the erection by the French of about twenty forts, besides block-houses and tradingposts, within claimed English domain. So while Acadia (q. v.) furnished one field for hostilities between the two nations, the country along the lakes and in the Ohio and Mississippi valleys furnished another.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ward, Richard 1689-1763 (search)
Ward, Richard 1689-1763 Colonial governor; born in Newport, R. I., April 15, 1689; was attorney-general of Rhode Island in 1712-13; deputy and clerk of the Assembly in 1714; recorder in 1714-30; deputy-governor in 1740 and governor in 1740-43. He died in Newport, R. I., Aug. 21, 1763. Ward, Richard 1689-1763 Colonial governor; born in Newport, R. I., April 15, 1689; was attorney-general of Rhode Island in 1712-13; deputy and clerk of the Assembly in 1714; recorder in 1714-30; deputy-governor in 1740 and governor in 1740-43. He died in Newport, R. I., Aug. 21, 1763.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whitefield, George 1714- (search)
Whitefield, George 1714- Clergyman; born in Gloucester, England, Dec. 16, 1714; was a religious enthusiast in very early life, fasting twice a week for thirty-six hours, and at the age of eighteen became a member of the club in which the denomination of Methodists took its rise. He became intimately associated in religious matters with John and Charles Wesley. In 1736 he was ordained deacon, and preached with such extraordinary effect the next Sunday that a complaint was made that he had driven fifteen persons mad. The same year the Wesleys accompanied Oglethorpe to Georgia, and in 1737 John Wesley invited Whitefield to join him in his work in America. He came in May, 1738; and after George Whitefield. laboring four months, and perfecting plans for founding an orphan-house at Savannah, he returned to England to receive priest's orders and to collect funds for carrying out his benevolent plans. With more than $5,000 collected he returned to Savannah, and there founded an o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Stephen 1693-1782 (search)
Williams, Stephen 1693-1782 Clergyman; born in Deerfield, Mass., May 14, 1693; was carried captive by the Indians to Canada with his family in 1704; redeemed by the French governor and sent to Boston in 1705. He wrote a narrative of his experiences in captivity; graduated at Harvard College in 1713; taught in Hadley in 1713-14; was ordained in the Congregational Church and took a charge in Longmeadow, Mass., in 1716; visited the Housatonic Indians, in Stockbridge, Mass., and established a mission among them in 1734; and was chaplain of a regiment in the expedition against Louisburg in 1745 and in the campaign of 1756. He died in Longmeadow, Mass., June 10, 1782.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wright, Sir James 1714-1785 (search)
Wright, Sir James 1714-1785 Colonial governor; born in Charleston, S. C., about 1714; was admitted to the bar and practised in his native city; was made lieutenant-governor and chief-justice of South Carolina, May 13, 1760; became royal governor of Georgia in 1764, and was the last representative of the King to administer the affairs of that colony. His policy was acceptable to the people until he tried to enforce the provisions of the Stamp Act. The English vessel Speedwell arrived at Sa1714; was admitted to the bar and practised in his native city; was made lieutenant-governor and chief-justice of South Carolina, May 13, 1760; became royal governor of Georgia in 1764, and was the last representative of the King to administer the affairs of that colony. His policy was acceptable to the people until he tried to enforce the provisions of the Stamp Act. The English vessel Speedwell arrived at Savannah with the stamped paper, Dec. 5, 1766. The Liberty boys endeavored to destroy this paper, but it was placed in Fort George, on Cockspur Island. Two years later the governor dismissed the Assembly after accusing it of insurrectionary conduct. In June, 1775, he tried to communicate with a number of British war-ships which had arrived at Tybee, but he was taken prisoner by Joseph Habersham. Later he escaped and reached the man-of-war Scarborough. Subsequently he returned to England, but i
pecified degree of accuracy. Sir Isaac Newton suggested the discovery of the longitude by the dial of an accurate time-keeper, and the Parliament of Queen Anne in 1714 passed an act granting £ 10,000 if the method discovered the longitude to a degree of sixty geographical miles, £ 15,000 if to forty miles, £ 20,000 if to thirty mEdwards. It was then sold at from four to five guineas a pound. Coffee-trees were imported from Mocha by the Dutch about 1700, and thence carried to Surinam. In 1714 a coffee-plant was presented by the magistrates of Amsterdam to Louis XIV., and placed in the grounds at Marly. The progeny of this plant were carried to Cayenne ermine the length of the spring involved in the action. When a longer portion is allowed to play, the beat is slower, and conversely. The English government in 1714 offered a reward of £ 20,000 for the discovery of a correct mode of ascertaining the longitude at sea. Harrison made four time-pieces within the years above cited,
1872. 139,914.PemberJune17, 1873. 140,921.HillJuly15, 1873. 144,450.GallowayNovember11, 1873. 148,946.GallyMarch24, 1874. 158,071.HansenDecember22, 1874. 168,898.HansenOctober19, 1875. 169,757.AlissoffNovember9, 1875. 170,233.CaseNovember23, 1875. 170,239.CrandallNovember23, 1875. 170,621.DemingNovember31, 1875. 171,139.JohnsonDecember14, 1875. 171,335.AllenDecember21, 1875. 171,408.MorganDecember21, 1875. See also the following English patents :— No.Date.No.Date. 395, of1714.306, of1869. 9,204, of1841.997, of1869. 9,745, of1843.3,699, of1869. 10,939, of1845.3,234, of1870. 868, of1854.918, of1871. 1,110, of1854.3,177, of1871. 674, of1856.823, of1872. 1,050, of1856.990, of1872. 1,969, of1857.1,912, of1872. 101, of1863.2,161, of1872. 2,031, of1863.2,239, of1872. 295, of1864.2,481, of1872. 893, of1864.3,548, of1872. 1,983, of1864.668, of1873. 2,260, of1864.3.852, of1873. 3,257, of1864.927, of1874. 1,412, of1864.1,786, of1874. 2,687, of1864.2,131, of1
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: philosophers and divines, 1720-1789 (search)
g proclamations of governors and presidents. Through the two Massachusetts divines, Chauncy and Mayhew, one may traverse, by parallel paths, the whole controversy between old and new lights, a controversy beginning with a narrow emotionalism and ending with a rationalistic trend towards universalism. A similar course of thought, but expressed with far higher literary skill, may be pursued in the writings of the Connecticut scholar Samuel Johnson (1696-1772), a graduate of Yale College in 1714, a disciple of George Berkeley when he came to Rhode Island in 1729 and, in 1754, the first head of King's College, Now Columbia University. New York. Especially does Johnson's Elementa Philosophica strike a balance between extremes. Like the Alciphron of Berkeley, to whom the Elements was dedicated, Johnson's work was directed against both fatalists and enthusiasts. The author's situation was logically fortunate. He was familiar with both predestination and fanatical principles and av
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
it was written by the maternal grandfather of Benjamin Franklin. Its four hundred lines in ballad quatrains are very bad verse, however, and, though it has been termed A manly plea for toleration in an age of intolerance, there is still question as to whether it was actually published in the author's lifetime and, consequently, whether Folger ran any risk. The most important piece of historical verse in this period was the work of the first native-born American poet, Benjamin Tompson (1644-1714), who, as his tombstone at Roxbury informs us, was a learned schoolmaster and physician and the renowned poet of New England, and is mortuus sed immortalis. His chief production, New England's Crises, is a formal attempt at an epic on King Philip's War. The prologue pictures early society in New England and recounts the decadence in manners and morals that has brought about the crisis,--the war as God's punishment. The six hundred and fifty lines of pentameter couplets are somewhat more pol
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
nal plays. comedy and melodrama. the Yankee plays. the realistic New York drama. social satire. romantic comedy. Gothic melodrama. domestic drama. farce. the periods in the development of the American drama Our native drama, even though it antedated the novel and the short story, has practically no history until the latter half of the eighteenth century. The first drama written in this country which is now in existence, the satirical farce, Androborus, was printed, it is true, in 1714. It was by Governor Richard Hunter For a description of Androborus, see Ford, P. L., The Beginnings of American Dramatic Literature in The New England magazine, Feb., 1894, New Series, vol. IX., No. 6, p. 674. of New York, but as he was an Englishman, the interest in his work is limited to its representation of local conditions. Androborus was not acted, and had no influence in the development of an acting drama. The two forces which seem to have led to the production of a native play
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