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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICE OF SALLUST. (search)
l. ii. p. 200. that his transitions are often abrupt; and that he too much affects antique phraseology.Quint. Inst. Or., viii. 3. But no writer can combine qualities that are incompatible. He is justly preferred by QuintilianInst. Or., ii. 5. to Livy, and well merits the praise given him by TacitusAnn., iii. 30. and Martial,xiv. 191. of being rerum Romanarum florentissimus auctor, and Romanâ primus in historiâ. Of the numerous editions of Sallust, that of Cortius, which appeared at Leipsic in 1724, and has been often reprinted, long indisputably held the first rank. But Cortius, as an editor, was somewhat too fond of expelling from his text all words that he could possibly pronounce superfluous; and succeeding editors, as Gerlach (Basil. 1823), Kritz (Leipsic, 1834), and Dietsch (Leipsic, 1846), have judiciously restored many words that he had discarded, and produced texts more acceptable in many respects to the generality of students. Sallust has been many times translated into Englis
Nathaniel Wade1694. Jonathan Tufts1695. Nathaniel Wade1696. Peter Tufts1698. Nathaniel Wade1699. Peter Tufts1700. Nathaniel Wade1703. Peter Tufts1705. Nathaniel Wade1706. Stephen Francis1707. Stephen Willis1708. John Francis1709. Ebenezer Brooks1710. John Bradshaw1711. John Whitmore1712. Thomas Willis1713. Stephen Willis1714. Jonathan Tufts1715. Samuel Wade1717. Thomas Tufts1718. John Bradshaw1719. Jonathan Tufts1721. John Bradshaw1722. Thomas Tufts1723. Ebenezer Brooks1724. John Bradshaw1725. Ebenezer Brooks1726. Stephen Hall1730. Thomas Hall1732. John Hall1733. Stephen Hall1734. John Willis1736. John Hall1737. Benjamin Willis1738. John Hall1739. Benjamin Willis1740. Simon Tufts1742. John Hall1743. Benjamin Willis1744. Samuel Brooks1745. Benjamin Willis1746. Jonathan Watson1749. Samuel Brooks1750. Isaac Royal1755. Zachariah Poole1762. Isaac Royal1763. Stephen Hall1764. Isaac Royal1765. Benjamin Hall1773. Willis Hall1785. Thomas Brooks1
been discovered concerning them. The name of Dr. John Bishop appears on the tax-bills of 1726-7, and then vanishes. Dr. Simon Tufts, son of Peter, born in Medford, Jan. 31, 1700, died here, Jan. 31, 1747. He graduated at Harvard College in 1724. He pursued his medical studies under all the advantages which nearness to Boston could give, and became distinguished in his profession. He is called doctor in the town records, May, 1724. The college at that time had not commenced the giving was a gentleman well descended and liberally educated. He was the youngest son of Captain Peter Tufts, of this town, by his second wife, who was daughter of the Rev. Seaborn Cotton, of Hampton. He took his degrees at Harvard College in the years 1724 and 1727. He early applied himself to the study of physic, and soon became eminent in that profession. He was honored with three commissions,--one for the peace, in the year 1733; another for a special justice, in 1741; and a third for justice o
, 1723.  48Solomon, b. Jan. 23, 1725.  49David.  50Frederick. 2-17John Tufts m. Elizabeth Sargent, Mar. 28, 1723, and had--  17-51John, b. Dec. 13, 1723; d. Aug. 16, 1725. 2-23SIMON Tufts was the first physician of Medford; graduated, H. C., 1724; d. June 31, 1747. He m. Abigail Smith, who d. 1790, aged 90, by whom he had--  23-52Simon, b. Jan. 16, 1727.  53Abigail, b. Sept. 22, 1730; m. John Bishop, Dec. 7, 1752.  54William, b. Aug. 28, 1732.  55Cotton, b. May 30, 1734.  56Samuel, buel.  17John, b. July 3, 1687.  18Christian, b. Dec. 17, 1688; m. Samuel Bass.  18 1/2Lydia, m. Cornelius Thayer.  19Ebenezer, b. Feb. 5, 1702. 4-19Ebenezer Turell, the minister, grad. 1721; studied with Rev. Benjamin Colman; settled at M., 1724, where he d., Dec. 8, 1778. He m., 1st, Jane Colman, Aug. 11, 1726, who d. Mar. 26, 1735; when he m., 2d, Oct. 23, 1735, Lucy, dau. of Addington Davenport, who d. May 17, 1759, aged 45. He m., 3d, Aug. 21, 1760, Jane, d. of Wm. Pepperell,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
s administration, thus affording an unbroken line of five generations of authors bearing the same name, a fact which, as far as I am informed, stands alone in the whole field of literature. Although a Whig in politics, he was a High Churchman, and had high notions of governmental prerogatives; but a long residence in Virginia, and the identity of his interests with those of the Virginians, appear to have greatly changed his views of governmental authority and popular rights. During the year 1724 Governor Spotswood married Ann Butler, daughter of Richard Bryan, Esq., of Westminster. She derived her middle name from James Butler, Duke of Ormond, her relative and godfather. The Governor now resided at Germana. It was here that Colonel William Byrd, of Westover, visited the Governor in 1732. I give the following extract from Colonel Byrd's journal: September 27.--Here I arrived about 3 o'clock, and found only Mrs. Spotswood at home, who received her old acquaintance with many a g
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 (search)
Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 Military officer; born in Ireland, about 1671; in 1712, with a regiment of 600 Carolinians and several hundred friendly Indians, killed 300 of the warring Tuscaroras in the first engagement and drove the survivors into their fortified town, where they were finally reduced to submission. Over 1,000 of them were killed or captured, and the remnant joined the Five Nations of New York. He died in Beaufort, S. C., in 1724. Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 Military officer; born in Ireland, about 1671; in 1712, with a regiment of 600 Carolinians and several hundred friendly Indians, killed 300 of the warring Tuscaroras in the first engagement and drove the survivors into their fortified town, where they were finally reduced to submission. Over 1,000 of them were killed or captured, and the remnant joined the Five Nations of New York. He died in Beaufort, S. C., in 1724.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bienville, Jean Baptiste le moyne, 1680-1701 (search)
om( France, bienville retained the office. Having tried unsuccessfully to cultivate the land by Indian labor, Bienville proposed to the government to exchange Indians for negroes in the West Indies, at the rate of three Indians for one negro. Bienville remained at the head of the colony until 1713, when Cadillac arrived, as governor, with a commission for the former as lieutenant-governor. Quarrels between them ensued. Cadillac was superseded in 1717 by Epinay, and Bienville received the decoration of the Cross of St. Louis. In 1718 he founded the city of New Orleans; and war breaking out between France and Spain, he seized Pensacola and put his brother Chateaugay in command there. He was summoned to France in 1724 to answer charges, where he remained until 1733, when he was sent back to Louisiana as governor, with the rank of lieutenant-general. Having made unsuccessful expeditions against the Chickasaws, he was superseded in 1743, and returned to France, where he died in 1765.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carleton, Sir Guy, Lord Dorchester 1724- (search)
Carleton, Sir Guy, Lord Dorchester 1724- civil and military officer; born in Stra- Guy Carleton. bane, Ireland, Sept. 3, 1724; entered the Guards at an early age, and became a lieutenant-colonel in 1748. He was aide to the Duke of Cumberland in the German campaign of 1757; was with Amherst in the siege of Louisburg in 1758; with Wolfe at Quebec (1759) as quartermaster-general; and was a brigadier-general at the siege of Belle Isle, where he was wounded. He was also quartermaster-general in the expedition against Havana in 1762, and in 1767 he was made lieutenant-governor of Quebec. The next year he was appointed governor. In 1772 he was promoted to major-general, and in 1774 was made governor-general of the Province of Quebec. In an expedition against the forts on Lake Champlain in 1775 he narrowly escaped capture; and at the close of the year he successfully resisted a siege of Quebec by Montgomery. The next spring and summer he drove the Americans out of Canada, and tot
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chabert, Joseph Bernard, Marquis De 1724-1805 (search)
Chabert, Joseph Bernard, Marquis De 1724-1805 naval officer; born in Toulon, France, Feb. 28, 1724; joined the navy in 1741; came to America, and fought with the French in the Revolutionary War, winning much distinction. Later he planned and finished maps of the shores of North America. He was author of Voyages sur les cotes de l'amerique septentrionale. He died in Paris, Dec. 1, 1805.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Coinage, United States (search)
aring the figure of an elephant were struck in England for the Carolinas and New England in 1694. Coins were also struck for Maryland, bearing the effigy of Lord Baltimore. In 1722-23, William Wood obtained a royal patent for coining small money for the English plantations in America. He made it of pinchbeck — an alloy of copper and tin. One side of the coin bore the image of George I., and on the other was a large double rose, with the legend Rosa Americana utile dulci. In the coinage of 1724 the rose was crowned. This base coin was vehemently opposed in the colonies. A writer of the day, speaking of the speculation, said Wood had the conscience to make thirteen shillings out of a pound of brass. The power of coinage was exercised by several of the independent States from 1778 until the adoption of the national Constitution. A mint was established at Rupert, Vt., by legislative authority in 1785, whence copper cents were issued, bearing on one side a plough and a sun rising fr
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