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Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 1 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1728 AD or search for 1728 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 29 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Skinner, Cortlandt 1728-1799 (search)
Skinner, Cortlandt 1728-1799 Military officer; born in New Jersey in 1728; a grandson of Stephen Van Cortlandt, of Van Cortlandt's Manor, N. Y. In 1775 he was attorney-general of New Jersey. He organized three battalions of loyalists, called New Jersey volunteers, and was given the commission of brigadier-general. He went to England after the war, where he received compensation for losses as a loyalist. He died in Bristol, England, in 1799. Skinners, a predatory band in the Revoluti1728; a grandson of Stephen Van Cortlandt, of Van Cortlandt's Manor, N. Y. In 1775 he was attorney-general of New Jersey. He organized three battalions of loyalists, called New Jersey volunteers, and was given the commission of brigadier-general. He went to England after the war, where he received compensation for losses as a loyalist. He died in Bristol, England, in 1799. Skinners, a predatory band in the Revolutionary War whose members professed to be Whigs, and who plundered the Tory families living on the Neutral Ground, in Westchester county, N. Y., between the British and American lines. They were not very scrupulous in their choice of victims, plunder being their chief aim. See Cow-boys.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smibert, or Smybert, John 1684-1751 (search)
Smibert, or Smybert, John 1684-1751 Portrait-painter; born in Edinburgh, Scotland, about 1684; studied in Italy and painted in London, and in 1728 accompanied Dean Berkeley to America. He painted the portraits of many New England worthies. The only portrait of Jonathan Edwards ever made was painted by Smibert, who died in Boston in 1751. Smibert introduced portrait-painting into America. He was not an artist of the first rank, for the arts were then at a low ebb in England; but the best portraits that we have of the eminent magistrates and divines in New England and New York, who lived between 1725 and 1751, are from his pencil. While with Berkeley at Newport he painted a group of portraits, including the dean and a part of his family, in which the figure of the artist appears. The picture belongs to Yale College.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stark, John 1728-1832 (search)
Stark, John 1728-1832 Military officer; born in Londonderry, N. H., Aug. 28, 1728; removed, with his father, to Derryfield (now Manchester) when he was about eight years old. In 1752, while on a hunting excursion, he was made a prisoner by the St. Francis Indians, and was ransomed in a few weeks for $103. He became popular with the Indians, and was adopted into their tribe. In 1755 he was made lieutenant of Rogers's Rangers, and performed good service during the French and Indian War. A member of the committee of safety at the commencement of the John Stark. Revolution, he was alive to the importance of every political event. On the news of the fight at Lexington, he hastened to Cambridge and was immediately chosen colonel of the New Hampshire troops. He was efficient in the battle on Bunker (Breed's) Hill. Near the close of 1776, after doing effective service in the Northern Department, he joined Washington on the Delaware. He commanded the vanguard in the battle at Trento
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Swatane or Shikellimy, (search)
Swatane or Shikellimy, Oneida Indian chief; represented the Five Nations in their affairs with Pennsylvania in 1728, and was present at nearly every treaty made between the whites and Indians. Shortly before his death he was baptized by Moravian missionaries. He died in Shamokin, Pa., Dec. 17, 1748.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Delaware, (search)
ople......April 14, 1870 New Castle, with a population of 2,300, incorporated as a city......1875 School bill passed; board of education to consist of the president of Delaware College, secretary of State, and State editor......1875 Act passed imposing a fine on any person taking part in any political torchlight parade......1881 High license bill passed by legislature......1889 Pillory and whipping for female convicts abolished......1889 Monument over grave of Caesar Rodney, 1728-84, member of Continental Congress, signer of Declaration of Independence, and president (governor) of the State, unveiled......Oct. 30, 1889 A secret-ballot law passed, and the governor made president of the State board of education instead of the president of Delaware College at session of the legislature......Jan. 6–May 16, 1891 Ex-Gov. John W. Hall dies at Frederica......Jan. 23, 1892 Inland waterway between Lewes and Chincoteague Bay, 75 miles long, begun......1893 Two hundr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
in urging inoculation. Dr. Boylston consents to the experiment upon his children and servants; 100 inoculated during the year ......1721 New England Courant started in Boston, with James Franklin, brother of Benjamin Franklin, as editor......Aug. 7, 1721 Benjamin Franklin leaves Boston for Philadelphia......October, 1723 William Burnet arrives at Boston as governor......July, 1728 Dispute between Governor Burnet and the House regarding a fixed salary; the House refusing it......1728-29 Governor Burnet dies......Sept. 7, 1729 Jonathan Belcher, a native of Massachusetts, appointed governor, and arrives at Boston......August, 1730 Worcester county formed......1731 Massachusetts and New Hampshire boundary fixed......1731 England forbids the colonies to export hats......1732 First freemason lodge in America established in Boston......1733 George Whitefield in Massachusetts......1740 Governor Belcher superseded by William Shirley......Aug. 13, 1741 [
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Viomenil, Antoine Charles du Houx, Baron de 1728-1782 (search)
Viomenil, Antoine Charles du Houx, Baron de 1728-1782 Military officer; born in Fauconcourt, Visages, France, Nov. 30, 1728. He attained the rank of major-general in the French army; and in 1780 was appointed second in command of Count de Rochambeau's troops which were sent to assist the American colonists; was promoted lieutenant-general in 1781, and given the grand cross of St Louis for services at the siege of Yorktown. After the war he was governor of La Rochelle, in 1783-89. He died in Paris, Nov. 9, 1782. His brother, Charles Joseph Hyacinthe du Houx, Marquis De Viomenil; born in the castle of Ruppes, Vosges, Aug. 22, 1734; attained the rank of majorgeneral in the French army; accompanied Count de Rochambeau to the United States as commander of the French artillery, and took a prominent part in the siege of Yorktown, for which he was granted a pension of 5,000 francs. He died in Paris, March 5, 1827. Virginia, colony of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Warren, mercy 1728-1814 (search)
Warren, mercy 1728-1814 Historian; born in Barnstable, Mass., Sept. 25, 1728; was Mercy Warren. the wife of Gen. James Warren and sister of James Otis. Her mind was as strong and active as that of her fiery brother, but she was restrained from taking public part in the politics of the day by her sex. She was a poet of much excellence, and corresponded with the leading statesmen of the day. She excelled in dramatic composition, and produced The group, a political satire; The Adulator; and two tragedies of five acts each, called The sack of Rome, and Ladies of Castile. The latter were written during the earlier years of the Revolutionary War, and published in 1778, and were full of patriotic sentiments. Her complete poetical works were published in 1790. In 1805 Mrs. Warren completed and published a History of the Revolutionary War (3 volumes). She died in Plymouth, Oct. 19, 1814.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wharton, Robert 1757-1834 (search)
Wharton, Robert 1757-1834 Mayor; born in Philadelphia. Pa., Jan. 12, 1757; was employed in the counting-house of his brother Charles, a merchant in Philadelphia; elected alderman in 1796. During that year he put down a riot of organized sailors who were refused exorbitant wages; in 1798 he also put an end to the Walnut Street prison act; was mayor of Philadelphia in 1798-1834, being elected to that office fifteen times. Mr. Wharton was president of the famous Schuylkill Fishing Company in 1812-28. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., March 7, 1834.
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