hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 220 results in 115 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
a considerable hight. The motive-power is supplied by a steam-engine moving its crank-shaft, connected with the axle of the drum by suitable spur-gearing. The chain system is now in use on the Danube, on the Charleroi Canal, in Belgium, the Beveland Canal, in Holland, and the Terneugen Canal, connecting Ghent with the Scheldt. It is about to be adopted on the Rhine, to facilitate the passage of Bingen Rapids, and on the Upper Elbe. The chain-towing system was first tried in France in 1732 by Marshal Saxe, in transporting war-material. One end of the rope was fastened at a point in advance, and the other passed round the drum of a horse-windlass on board the boat. When the fast end of the rope was reached, the boat was moored until the rope was adjusted for another pull. Nearly a century after this — in 1820 — a modification of the plan was put in regular use on the Rhone. The boat carried a steam-capstan arranged to wind alternately two ropes. Two tenders were provided to
ved from the name of a Venetian coin, worth about a cent and a half, and which was the price of the Venetian newspaper first published. The Maryland gazette was established in 1727 or 1728; the Virginia gazette, 1736; the Rhode Island gazette, 1732; South Carolina gazette, 1731 or 1732; Georgia gazette, 1763. The first paper in New Hampshire was published in 1756, but in the adjacent State of Vermont none existed prior to 1781. After the Revolution, the history of newspaper progress be1732; Georgia gazette, 1763. The first paper in New Hampshire was published in 1756, but in the adjacent State of Vermont none existed prior to 1781. After the Revolution, the history of newspaper progress becomes identical with that of the nation, the printing-press keeping closely in the van of Anglo-American civilization. The honor of publishing the first paper west of the Alleghanies is claimed for John Scull of Pittsburgh, who, it is stated, founded the Pittsburgh gazette in 1783. The first north of the Ohio River, being the third or fourth west of the Alleghanies, is said to have been the Centinel of the Northwest territory, by William Maxwell, 1793. According to De Saint Foix, the ea
are received every five hours. Ob-stet′ri-cal chair. One capable of affording convenient position for the delivery of the child and access of the midwife. Obsterical forceps. Ob-stet′ri-cal For′ceps. (Surgical.) An acconcheur's instrument for grasping the head of the child and facilitating delivery. They are of varied shapes and construction, and have specific means, such as rings or hooks, to assist the hand when force is applied. The instrument was described by Butler in 1732. Ob-stet′ri-cal In′stru-ments. (Surgical.) For assisting delivery, measuring the pelvic opening, etc. Among them may be enumerated the cephalotribe, crochet, forceps, obstetrical supporter, pelvimeter, perforator, placenta-forceps, and hook. Herophilus of Alexandria, of the school of Ptolemy, wrote on obstetrics. Ob-stet′ri-cal Sup-port′er. One having braces around the hips and knees, and affording holds for the hands, to assist the muscular exertions of the mother du
be set up. The Faculty of Harvard College was censor till 1662, when licensers of the press were appointed. In 1755 the press was free. A Psalter in the English and Indian languages was printed at the University press in 1709. A printing-press was established in New London, Conn., in 1709; the first printing-press in Turkey was brought from Paris by Mohammed Effendi, in 1721; the first press in Annapolis, Md., was in 1726; Williamsburg, Va., 1729; Charleston, S. C., 1730; Newport, R. I., 1732; Halifax, N. S., 1751; Newbern, N. C., 1755; Portsmouth, N. H., 1756; Savannah, Ga., 1763; Quebec, Canada, 1764. The first press west of the Alleghany range was in Cincinnati, 1793. The first press west of the Mississippi, in St. Louis, 1808. Stereotyping was invented by William Ged of Edinburgh, in 1725; inking-rollers, by Nicholson; composition inking-rollers, by Donkin and Bacon of London, in 1813. The Roman alphabet is used for the body of printed matter in English books and newsp
ashing-floors. Thrashing in Lombardy is generally performed by means of a fluted roller (Fig. 6390) drawn around in a circular track. Hohlfield of Hermerndorf, in Saxony, 1711-1771, invented a thrashing-machine while working on the estate of Gusow, in the service of the Prussian minister, Count de Podervils. We are not informed as to its construction; it seems to have given satisfaction. He also invented a straw-chopper and many other machines. Menzies made a machine in Scotland in 1732, and Stirling of Dumblane another in 1758, but they do not seem to have been successes. Meikle, of Tyningham, East Lothian, Scotland, invented a machine in 1786, which is the type of modern thrashers. Menzies's had a series of revolving flails, and Stirling's had a cylinder with arms upon a vertical shaft running at high velocity. Meikle invented the drum with beaters acting upon the grain in the sheaf, which was fed between rollers. The English improvement was to make the beating drum
n 1696 was the preliminary to separation, and in 1713 Cambridge Farms became a distinct town by the name of Lexington. In 1754, the boundary between Cambridge and Watertown was carried westward about half a mile from its former position at or near Sparks Street, thus adding to Cambridge some of its most valuable area for dwellings. Between 1802 and 1820, other desirable acquisitions, including the Norton estate, were acquired from that part of Charlestown which is now Somerville. After 1732, Menotomy was the Second Parish of Cambridge, until 1807, when it was incorporated a distinct town under the clumsy title of West Cambridge, for which the name Arlington was substituted in 1867. After 1779, the territory remaining on the south side of Charles River was known as the Third Parish, or Little Cambridge, until 1807, when it became a separate town under the name of Brighton. In 1873, Brighton was annexed to Boston. It was in the natural course of things that these outlying d
The fourth meeting-house came in his time, and on the old site. An Episcopal church was opened in 1761. During this time Whitefield was arousing the country by his marvelous preaching. In 1740 he came here, and saw many things which displeased him. The college faculty published a pamphlet in reply to his charges, and he modified some of them. He became a friend of the college, and was of service in procuring books for the library. There was still further attempt to reduce the church. In 1732 Menotomy was made a precinct by itself, and in 1739 a church was formed there. From 1747 to 1749 the people in what is now Brighton were seeking to be made a separate religious precinct. This was stoutly resisted, but in 1779 the separate precinct was incorporated, and authorized to settle a minister of its own, and in 1783 a new church was formed. But the great event of Dr. Appleton's ministry was the Revolution and the beginning of the republic. Cambridge had a conspicuous share in al
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
an. From the first stopping place, where she found the other guests tyed by the Lipps to a pewter engine, and the next day's guide, whose shade on his Hors resembled a Globe on a Gate post, there was scarcely a stage of her journey which did not provide its subject for entertaining comment. An equal appreciation of the fact that mileage and food are not the only things worth recording by those who go abroad gives permanent value to the diaries kept by the second William Byrd of Westover in 1732 and 1733, when he followed the course of Edward Bland in searching for the likeliest Virginian land-holdings. Byrd was a model for all who journey in company, for he broke not the Laws of Travelling by uttering the least Complaint at inopportune torrents or an impertinent Tooth . .. that I cou'd not grind a Biscuit but with much deliberation and presence of mind. He contriv'd to get rid of this troublesome Companion by cutting a Caper, with a stout cord connecting the tooth and the snag of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
ed by Bradford, a series of sprightly Busy-body papers in the vein of the periodical essayists. Keimer was forced to sell out; and Franklin acquired from him the paper known from 2 October, 1729, as The Pennsylvania gazette. To this he contributed, besides much miscellaneous matter, such pieces as the Dialogue between Philocles and Horatio concerning virtue and pleasure, the letters of Anthony Afterwit and Alice Addertongue, A meditation on a Quart Mug, and A Witch trial at Mount Holly. In 1732 he began to issue the almanacs containing the wit and wisdom of Poor Richard, a homely popular philosopher, who is only the incarnation of common sense, and who is consequently not, as has been carelessly assumed, to be identified with his creator. By the time he was thirty Franklin gave promise of becoming, by a gradual expansion of his useful activities, the leading Pennsylvanian. In 1736 he was chosen clerk of the General Assembly, and in the following year was appointed postmaster of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
d For arts, for arms, whose pen and sword alike As Catos did, may admireation strike In to his foes; while they confess with all It was their guilt stil'd him a Criminall. Maryland has even less to show than Virginia. The rhyming tags of verse appended to the chapters of George Alsop's Character of the province of Maryland (1666) cannot be taken seriously. The description of Maryland contained in the Carmen Seculare of a certain Mr. Lewis shows that Pope had not yet reached Baltimore in 1732, however at home he may have been in Boston and Philadelphia. Of the same type is a True relation of the Flourishing state of Pennsylvania (1686), by John Holme, a resident of that colony. The True relation is utilitarian in purpose and homely in style, but on the whole its five hundred lines in various metres, with their catalogues of native animals and plants in the manner of William Wood's verses in his New England's prospect, are rather pleasing. New York produced practically no Englis
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...