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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 48 48 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 35 35 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 10 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 8 8 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 5 5 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 3 3 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
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700. Nathaniel Wade1703. Peter Tufts1705. Nathaniel Wade1706. Stephen Francis1707. Stephen Willis1708. John Francis1709. Ebenezer Brooks1710. John Bradshaw1711. John Whitmore1712. Thomas Willis1713. Stephen Willis1714. Jonathan Tufts1715. Samuel Wade1717. Thomas Tufts1718. John Bradshaw1719. Jonathan Tufts1721. John Bradshaw1722. Thomas Tufts1723. Ebenezer Brooks1724. John Bradshaw1725. Ebenezer Brooks1726. Stephen Hall1730. Thomas Hall1732. John Hall1733. Stephen Hall1734. John Willis1736. John Hall1737. Benjamin Willis1738. John Hall1739. Benjamin Willis1740. Simon Tufts1742. John Hall1743. Benjamin Willis1744. Samuel Brooks1745. Benjamin Willis1746. Jonathan Watson1749. Samuel Brooks1750. Isaac Royal1755. Zachariah Poole1762. Isaac Royal1763. Stephen Hall1764. Isaac Royal1765. Benjamin Hall1773. Willis Hall1785. Thomas Brooks1788. Willis Hall1789. Ebenezer Hall1790. Richard Hall1794. John Brooks1796. Ebenezer Hall1798. John Brooks18
t, Judith----; 2d, Elizabeth Robinson, July 17, 1723; and had--  6-8Samuel, b. Jan., 1708; d. Oct. 9, 1791.  9William, b. Dec., 1710.  10Susanna, b. Mar., 1713; m. John Clough.  11Elizabeth, b. Oct., 1715; m.----Holman.  12Nathaniel, b. m. Mercy Dudley.  13Jacob, b. Aug., 1720.  14Mary, b. July, 1724; m.----Palmer.  15John, b. Feb., 1725.  16Benjamin, b. 1730. 6-8Samuel Reeves m. Elizabeth----, 1733, who d. Apr. 23, 1759, aged 51. He d. Oct. 9, 1791, and had--  8-16a.Elizabeth, b. 1734; m. Isaac Warren, Oct. 3, 1751.  b.Judith, b. 1735; m. Joseph Albree, Dec. 23, 1756.  c.Hannah, b. 1738; d., unm., Feb. 26, 1791.  d.Thomas, b. 1741; d., Feb. 12, 1755. 6-13Jacob Reeves m. Abigail Ferguson; lived some time at Roxbury, and moved thence to Wayland. He had--  13-17Nathaniel, b. Mar. 6, 1749.  18Elizabeth, b. Dec. 25, 1753; m. Thomas Heard.  19Naomi, b. Mar. 12, 1756; d. young.  20Mary, b. July 12, 1758.  21Anne, m. Jona. Underwood.  22Jacob, b. Jan. 31, 1
rds, and the dates of their appearance thereon. Adams, 1757; Allen, 1757; Andriesse, 1799; Attwood, 1718; Auld, 1750; Austin, 1752. Bacon, 1749; Bailey, 1806; Ballard, 1721: Binford, 1757; Blodgett, 1752; Blunt, 1748; Boutwell, 1753; Bradish, 1745; Brattle, 1747; Bucknam, 1766; Budge, 1762; Burdit, 1761; Burns, 1751; Bushby, 1735; Butterfield, 1785. Calif, 1750; Chadwick, 1756; Cook, 1757; Cousins, 1755; Crease, 1757; Crowell, 1752. Davis, 1804; Degrusha, 1744; Dexter, 1767; Dill, 1734; Dixon, 1758; Dodge, 1749; Durant, 1787. Earl, 1781; Easterbrook, 1787; Eaton, 1755; Edwards, 1753; Erwin, 1752. Farrington, 1788; Faulkner, 1761; Fessenden, 1785; Fitch, 1785; Floyd, 1750; Fowle, 1752; French, 1755. Galt, 1757; Gardner, 1721; Garret, 1732; Giles, 1719; Gill, 1738; Goddard, 1745; Gowen, 1773; Grace, 1779; Greatton, 1718; Green, 1785. Hosmer, 1746; Hunt, 1751. Kendall, 1752; Kettle, or Kettell, 1740. Lathe, Laithe, and Leathe, 1738; Learned, 1793; Le Bosquet,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aitken, Robert, 1734-1802 (search)
Aitken, Robert, 1734-1802 Publisher; born in Scotland in 1734; arrived in Philadelphia in 1769; was a practical printer, and published the Pennsylvania magazine, or American monthly Museum, from January, 1775, to June, 1776. He was a warm Whig, and was thrown into prison after the British took possession of Philadelphia, late in 1777. He very narrowly escaped the horrors of a British prison-ship in New York. He issued the first American edition of the Bible in 1782, by which he lost cons1734; arrived in Philadelphia in 1769; was a practical printer, and published the Pennsylvania magazine, or American monthly Museum, from January, 1775, to June, 1776. He was a warm Whig, and was thrown into prison after the British took possession of Philadelphia, late in 1777. He very narrowly escaped the horrors of a British prison-ship in New York. He issued the first American edition of the Bible in 1782, by which he lost considerable money. He is supposed to have been the author of a paper entitled An inquiry concerning the principles of a commercial system for the United States. He died in Philadelphia in July, 1802.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
after the death of his father. V. Charles Calvert ii., son of Benedict, and the fifth Lord Baltimore, Was born Sept. 29. 1699, and was an infant in law when he succeeded to his father's title. In July, 1730, he married the widow Mary Janssen, youngest daughter of Gen. Theodore Janssen. His life was spent chiefly in England. In 1731 he was appointed gentleman of the bedchamber to the Prince of Wales, and soon afterwards was elected Fellow of the Royal Society. He was in Parliament in 1734, and in 1741 was appointed Junior Lord of the Admiralty. In the spring of 1741 he was appointed cofferer to the Prince of Wales and surveyor-general of the Duchy lands in Cornwall. After having ruled Maryland in person and by deputy more than thirty years, he died April 24, 1751, at his home in London. Vi. Frederick Calvert, sixth and last Lord Baltimore, Was born in 1731, and succeeded to the title of his father, Charles Calvert II., in 1751. He married Lady Diiana Egerton, younges
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berkeley, George, 1684-1753 (search)
Kitt's (St. Christopher's), which had been ceded to England for the establishment of the institution. With these assurances Berkeley went to Newport, R. I. (1729), bought a farm and built a house, intending to invest the college funds, when received, in American lands, and then to make arrangements for a supply of pupils. He had just married, and brought his bride with him. The scheme for the college failed for lack of government co-operation after the death of the King, who favored it. In 1734 Berkeley was made Bishop of Cloyne, which place he held for almost twenty years. He gave to Yale College his estate in Rhode Island, known as White Hall, and also 880 volumes for its library. He died in Oxford, Jan. 14, 1753. Pope ascribed to him every virtue under the sun. It was in view of the establishment of the college that he wrote his famous lines On the Prospect of planting Arts and learning in America, in which occur these often-quoted lines, Westward the course of empire ta
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Caldwell, James 1734- (search)
Caldwell, James 1734- Clergyman; born in Charlotte county, Va., in April, 1734. Graduating at Princeton in 1759, he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Elizabethtown in 1762. Zealously espousing the revolutionary cause, he was much disliked by the Tories. Appointed chaplain of a New Jersey brigade, he was for a time in the Mohawk Valley. In 1780 his church and residence were burned by a party of British and Tories; and the same year a British incursion from Staten Island pillaged the village of Connecticut Farms, where his family were temporarily residing. A soldier shot his wife through a window while she was sitting on a bed with her babe. At that time Mr. Caldwell was in Washington's camp at Morristown. In the successful defence of Springfield, N. J., June 23, 1780, when the wadding for the soldiers' guns gave out, he brought the hymn-books from the neighboring church and shouted, Now put Watts into them, boys. In an altercation at Elizabethtown Point with an Am
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chastellux, Francois Jean, Chevalier De (search)
Chastellux, Francois Jean, Chevalier De Historian; born in Paris, France, in 1734; served in the American Revolution under Rochambeau as a major-general. His amiability gained him the friendship of Washington. He was the author of Voyage dans l'amerique septentrionale dans les annees 1780-82; Discours sur les avantages et les dessavantages qui resultent pour l'europe de la decouverte de l'amerique, etc. He also translated into French Humphrey's Address to the army of the United States. He died in Paris, Oct. 28, 1788.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Floyd, William 1734-1821 (search)
Floyd, William 1734-1821 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Brookhaven, Suffolk co., N. Y., Dec. 17, 1734; took an early and vigorous part in the Revolution; was a member of the New York committee of correspondence; and a member of the first Continental Congress in 1774, and until 1777. He was again a member after October, 1778. He was a State Senator in 1777. During the occupation of Long Island by the British, for nearly seven years, his family were in exile. He held the commission of brigadier-general, and commanded the Suffolk county militia in repelling an invasion of Long Island by the British. General Floyd was a member of the first national Congress, and as Presidential elector gave his vote for Jefferson in 1801. He died in Weston, Oneida co., N. Y., Aug. 4, 1821.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Freemasonry, (search)
Freemasonry, A secret fraternal organization of which there is no certain information as to the time of its introduction into the United States. According to many masonic writers a provincial grand lodge (St. John's) and also a private lodge were established at Boston, Mass., by Henry Price on July 30, 1733. Benjamin Franklin, who is supposed to have been initiated in England, published the masonic constitution in 1734; and during the same year Henry Price was constituted grand master over all North America. On Nov. 4, 1752, George Washington became a member of the order and on Aug. 4, 1753, was made a master mason. The first masonic hall in the United States was built in Philadelphia in 1754. The returns of the grand lodges of the United States and British America for 1899-1900 were as follows: Whole number of members, 857,577; raised, 46,175; admissions and restorations, 21,325; withdrawals, 16,603; expulsions and suspensions. 597; suspensions for non-payment of dues, 16,8
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