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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 57 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 41 41 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 17 17 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 12 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 8 8 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 5 5 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1735 AD or search for 1735 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 57 results in 45 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John, 1735- (search)
Adams, John, 1735- Second President of the United States; from 1797 to 1801; Federalist; born in Braintree (near Quincy), Mass.. Oct. 30, 1735. He was graduated at Harvard College in 1755, and immediately afterwards taught school at Worcester, where he began the study of law. His father was in moderate circumstances — a selectman and a farmer. Beginning the profession of law in Braintree in 1758, he soon acquired a good practice; and, when he was twenty-nine years of age, he married Abigail Smith, an accomplished woman possessed of great common-sense. His first appearance in the political arena was as author of Instructions of the town of Braintree to its Representatives on the subject of the Stamp act, which was adopted by over forty towns. Associated with Gridley and Otis in supporting a memorial addressed to the governor and council, praying that the courts might proceed without the use of stamps, Adams opened the case by declaring that the Stamp Act was void, as Parliament
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, James, 1690-1756 (search)
of New York, to which he emigrated from Scotland in 1715, where he was born in 1690. He had fled from Scotland because of his peril there as an adherent of the Young Pretender. He was accompanied by William Smith, afterwards chief-justice of the province and its historian. He was made surveyor-general of New Jersey and New York. was secretary of the latter colony, and attained eminence in the profession of the law. As attorney-general of the province and occupant of other important positions, he became distinguished. He was one of the able counsel who defended the freedom of the press in the person of John Peter Zenger in 1735. Because of the part which he took in that famous trial he was arbitrarily excluded from the bar, but was reinstated in 1737. He was associated with Franklin and others in founding the American Philosophical Society. He was the father of William Alexander, known as Lord Stirling, a general in the Continental army. He died in New York City, April 2. 1756.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alison, Francis, 1705-1779 (search)
Alison, Francis, 1705-1779 Patriot and educator; born in Donegal county, Ireland, in 1705; came to America in 1735; and in 1752 he took charge of an academy in Philadelphia. From 1755 until his death he was Vice-provost and Professor of Moral Philosophy of the College of Pennsylvania. His chief claim to honor among men is that he was the tutor of a large number of Americans who were conspicuous actors in the events of the Revolution that accomplished the independence of the United States of America. He died in Philadelphia. Nov. 28, 1779.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boone, Daniel, 1735-1820 (search)
Boone, Daniel, 1735-1820 Explorer; born in Bucks county, Pa., Feb. 11, 1735. From his youth he was a famous hunter, and, while yet a minor, he emigrated, with his father, to North Carolina, where he married. In May, 1759, Boone and five others went to explore the forests of Kentucky. There he was captured by some Indians, but escaped, and returned home in 1771. In 1773 he led a party of settlers to the wilds he had explored; and in 1774 conducted a party of surveyors to the Daniel Boone. falls of the Ohio (now Louisville). He had taken his family with the other families to Kentucky in 1773, where they were in perpetual danger from the barbarians of the forest. He had several fights with the Indians; and in 1775 he built a fort on the Kentucky River on the present site of Boonesboro. In 1777 several attacks were made on this fort by the Indians. They was repulsed, but in February, 1778. Boone was captured by them, and taken to Chillicothe, beyond the Ohio, and thence to D
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
Burr, Aaron, 1716- educator; born in Fairfield, Conn., Jan. 4, 1716; was of German descent; graduated at Yale College in 1735; and ordained by the presbytery of east Jersey in 1737. He became pastor at Newark. N. J., where he was chiefly instrumental in founding the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and was elected its president in 1748. In 1752 he married a daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the metaphysician. In 1754 he accompanied Whitefield to Boston. He died Sept. 24, 1757. Vice-President of the United States; born at Newark. N. .J., Feb. 6, 1756; a son of Rev. Aaron Burr, President of the College of New Jersey, and of a daughter of the eminent theologian, Jonathan Edwards. When nineteen years of age, he entered the Continental army, at Cambridge, as a private soldier, and as such accompanied Arnold in his expedition to Quebec. From the line of that expedition, in the wilderness. Arnold sent him with despatches to General Montgomery, at Montreal, wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Campbell, Donald 1735- (search)
Campbell, Donald 1735- Military officer; born in Scotland about 1735; entered the British army, and on Jan. 4, 1756, became a lieutenant in the Royal American Regiment; promoted captain of the same, Aug. 29, 1759; was acting commandant of Fort Detroit when that place was besieged by Pontiac. At the request of the latter he consented to confer with him. Though he was several times warned of treachery, he would not remain in the fort. After addressing the savages he was taken captive by thry officer; born in Scotland about 1735; entered the British army, and on Jan. 4, 1756, became a lieutenant in the Royal American Regiment; promoted captain of the same, Aug. 29, 1759; was acting commandant of Fort Detroit when that place was besieged by Pontiac. At the request of the latter he consented to confer with him. Though he was several times warned of treachery, he would not remain in the fort. After addressing the savages he was taken captive by them and tortured to death, in 1763.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cannon, (search)
Cannon, In the United States, were cast at Lynn, Mass., by Henry Leonard, in 1647, and at Orr's foundry, Bridgewater, 1648. In 1735 the Hope Furnace was established in Rhode Island, where six heavy cannon, ordered by the State, were cast in 1775. The heaviest guns used at this time were 18-pounders. William Denning makes wrought-iron cannon of staves bound together with wrought-iron bands, and boxed and breeched, 1790. Colonel Bomford, of the United States ordnance department, invents a cannon called the columbiad, a long-chambered piece for projecting solid shot and shell with a heavy charge of powder, 1812. West Point foundry established under special patronage of the government, 1817. First contract of Gouverneur Kemble, president, for the West Point Foundry Association, for thirty-two 42-pounders, long guns, July 11, 1820. First gun rifled in America at the South Boston Iron Company's foundry, 1834. Cyrus Alger patents and makes the first malleable iron gu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carroll, John 1735- (search)
Carroll, John 1735- Clergyman; born in John Carroll. Upper Marlboro, Md., Jan. 8, 1735; was educated at St. Omer's, Liege, and Bruges; ordained a priest in 1769, and entered the order of Jesuits soon afterwards. He travelled through Europe with young Lord Staunton in 1770 as private tutor, and in 1773 became a professor in the college at Bruges. In 1775 he returned to Maryland, and the next year, by desire of Congress, he accompanied a committee of that body on a mission to Canada. That committee was composed of Dr. Franklin, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, and Samuel Chase. He was appointed the papal vicargeneral for the United States in 1786, and made Baltimore his fixed residence. In 1790 he was consecrated the first Roman Catholic bishop in the United States. He founded St. Mary's College in 1791, and in 1804 obtained a charter for Baltimore College. Liberal in his views, he maintained the friendship of all Protestant sects. A few years before his death, in Georgetow
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cilley, Joseph 1735-1799 (search)
Cilley, Joseph 1735-1799 Military officer; born in Nottingham, N. H., in 1735; took part in the dismantling of the fort at Portsmouth in 1774; led a company of volunteers into Boston after the battle of Lexington; made colonel of the 1st New Hampshire Regiment in 1777; took part in the attack on Ticonderoga and in the actions at Bemis's Heights, Monmouth, and Stony Point. He died in Nottingham, N. H., Aug. 25, 1799. Cilley, Joseph 1735-1799 Military officer; born in Nottingham, N. H., in 1735; took part in the dismantling of the fort at Portsmouth in 1774; led a company of volunteers into Boston after the battle of Lexington; made colonel of the 1st New Hampshire Regiment in 1777; took part in the attack on Ticonderoga and in the actions at Bemis's Heights, Monmouth, and Stony Point. He died in Nottingham, N. H., Aug. 25, 1799.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cooper, miles 1735-1785 (search)
Cooper, miles 1735-1785 Clergyman; born in England in 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the college, and he answered the pamphlet with ability. Cooper became very obnoxious to the Whigs, and a public letter, signed Three millions, warned him and his friends that their lives were in danger. On the night of May 10 a mob, led by Sons of Liberty, after destroying or carrying guns on the Battery, proceeded to drive him from the college. He succeeded in escaping to a British vessel, and sailed for England. He commemorated this stirring event by a poem printed in the Gentleman's magazine
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