Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1744 AD or search for 1744 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 35 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Le Moyne, 1656-1683 (search)
sist his brother Iberville in Hudson Bay, and brought over emigrants to Louisiana in a squadron to found a colony there. In 1718-19 he surveyed the coasts there, and took part in expeditions against the Spaniards at Pensacola and in Mobile Bay. In 1720 he commanded a ship-of-the-line, and died a rear-admiral of the royal navy. He was also governor of Rochefort at the time of his death, having been appointed in 1723. Antoine, Sieur de Chateaugay, was born in Montreal, July 7, 1683; died in Rochefort, France, March 21, 1747. He belonged to the royal army, and came with colonists to Louisiana in 1704, serving under Iberville there against the English. He was made chief commandant of Louisiana in 1717, and King's lieutenant in the colony and knight of St. Louis in 1718. He was in command of Pensacola in 1719; a prisoner of war for a while afterwards to the Spaniards; governor of Martinique; and, returning to France in 1744, became governor of Ile Royale, or Cape Breton, in 1745.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts, (search)
publish a newspaper, pamphlet, or anything else unless it should be approved and licensed by the colonial secretary. This order was evaded by the Courant being published in the name of his brother Benjamin, but the caution necessary to be used made contributors shy. They gradually ceased to write, and the paper, losing interest, finally perished for lack of support. Such was the fate of the first nominally free press in America. The colony was involved in war with its French neighbors in 1744, in consequence of a war between France and England. In that war Massachusetts contributed largely in men and means to the capture of Louisburg (1745), and in attempts to conquer Canada. She also bore her part in the French and Indian War; and in the opposition to the Stamp Act and other schemes of the British Parliament for taxing the English-American colonists, Massachusetts took a leading part. Recent acts of Parliament for taxing the Americans caused the Massachusetts The State-H
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mayhew, Jonathan 1720- (search)
Mayhew, Jonathan 1720- Clergyman; born in Martha's Vineyard, Mass., Oct. 8, 1720; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and ordained minister of the West Church, Boston, in 1747, which post he held until his death, July 9, 1766. He was a zealous republican in politics, and his preaching and writing were remarkable for their controversial character. He warmly opposed the operations of the British Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, for he regarded it as an instrument for the spread of Episcopacy. He became involved in a controversy with Dr. Seeker, Archbishop of Canterbury, because the latter proposed the introduction of bishops into the colonies; co-operated with Otis and others in their resistance to measures of the British Parliament concerning the Americans; and was among the boldest of the Whigs. His death deprived the cause of a stanch champion.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mifflin, Thomas -1800 (search)
Mifflin, Thomas -1800 Military officer; born of Quaker parents, in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1744; was educated in the Philadelphia College; visited Europe in 1765, and, on his return, became a merchant. Having served in the legislature of Pennsylvania, Thomas Mifflin. he was chosen a member of the first Continental Congress in 1774; was appointed major of one of the first regiments raised in Philadelphia, and accompanied Washington as aide-de-camp to Cambridge in the summer of 1775. All through the Revolutionary War Mifflin was a faithful and efficient officer, rising to the rank of major-general in 1777. He was eloquent in speech, and was efficient in rousing his countrymen to action when necessary. In this way, traversing Pennsylvania, he caused large numbers of its citizens to flock to the standard of Washington before the attack on the enemy at Trenton. He was quartermaster-general, and, in 1777, was a member of the board of war. Mifflin was one of Conway's cabal, a co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mohegan, or Mohican, Indians, (search)
bulk of the nation finally returned to the Hudson, and kept up a communication with the French in Canada, who called them Loups (wolves), which is the meaning of Mohegan. When the English and French began their great struggle for the mastery in America (about 1690), the Hudson Mohegans made peace with the Mohawks and joined the English, but were soon reduced to 200 warriors, and the Connecticut Mohegans to about 150. Some of the latter were collected at Stockbridge, Mass.; and from 1740 to 1744 the Moravians had a flourishing mission among them at Shekomeco, in Dutchess county, N. Y. Some of these went to Pennsylvania under the care of the Moravians. In the Revolution they joined the Americans, and were found in the ranks at Bunker Hill, White Plains, and other fields. After the war some of the Mohegans emigrated to Oneida, under the Rev. Samson Occum, a native preacher, and others, and before 1830 they had emigrated to Green Bay, Wis., where they abandoned their tribal relations
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Paterson, John 1744-1808 (search)
Paterson, John 1744-1808 Military officer; born in New Britain, Conn., in 1744; graduated at Yale College in 1762; became a lawyer, and was an active patriot in Massachusetts at the breaking-out of the Revolution, being a member of the Provincial Congress. After the affair at Lexington he hastened with a regiment of minute-men to Cambridge, where he cast up the first redoubt of the fortifications around Boston. After the evacuation of that city he was sent to Canada, and a part of his reg1744; graduated at Yale College in 1762; became a lawyer, and was an active patriot in Massachusetts at the breaking-out of the Revolution, being a member of the Provincial Congress. After the affair at Lexington he hastened with a regiment of minute-men to Cambridge, where he cast up the first redoubt of the fortifications around Boston. After the evacuation of that city he was sent to Canada, and a part of his regiment was engaged at the Cedars. When the army left Canada he joined Washington, and was engaged in the battles of Trenton and Princeton; and in February, 1777, he was made brigadiergeneral and attached to the Northern Department, where he rendered important services in the events which ended in the capture of Burgoyne. At the battle of Monmouth, the next year, he was very efficient, and remained in the service until the close of the war. In 1786 he commanded a detachment of Berkshire militia
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pitt, William 1708-1778 (search)
Pitt, William 1708-1778 The Great commoner ; born in Westminster, England, Nov. 15, 1708; educated at Eton and Oxford, he entered Parliament in 1735, where he was the most formidable opponent of Robert Walpole. In 1744 the famous Duchess of Marlborough bequeathed him $50,000 for having defended the laws of his country and endeavoring to save it from ruin. Afterwards Sir William Pynsent left him the whole of his fortune. He held the office of vice-treasurer of Ireland (1746), and soon afterwards was made paymaster of the army and one of the privy council. In 1755 he was William Pitt. dismissed from office, but in 1757 was made secretary of state, and soon infused his own energy into every part of the public service, placing England in the front rank of nations. By his energy in pressing the war in America (see French and Indian War) he added Canada to the British Empire and decided for all time the future of the Mississippi Valley. All through the progress of the dispute
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pomeroy, Seth 1706- (search)
Pomeroy, Seth 1706- Military officer; born in Northampton, Mass., May 20, 1706; became a gunsmith; was a captain in the provincial army of Massachusetts in 1744; and was at the capture of Louisburg in 1745. In 1775 he took command of Colonel Williams's regiment, after his death, in the battle of Lake George. In 1774-75 he was a delegate to the Provincial Congress, and was chosen a brigadier-general of militia in February, 1775, but fought as a private soldier at the battle of Bunker (Breed's) Hill. On his appointment as senior brigadier-general of the Continental army, some difficulty arose about rank, when he resigned and retired to his farm; but when, late in 1776, New Jersey was invaded by the British, he again took the field, and at the head of militia marched to the Hudson River, at Peekskill, where he died, Feb. 19, 1777.
8, the French broke up these posts, but they were soon re-established. Down to 1720, the only Spanish inhabitants of Texas were in the missions, but in that year the Spanish government ordered the transportation of 400 families from the Canaries to Texas, but only thirteen families arrived that year and settled at San Antonio. This new population stimulated the missions to greater efforts. A Spanish governor of Texas was appointed. The population of Texas increased but slowly. As late as 1744 it did not exceed 1,500 souls. That province remained in the possession of Spain until the independence of Mexico was achieved, and it was part of that republic until it won its own independence in 1836. War was begun by Great Britain against Spain in 1739, and Admiral Vernon was sent with a squadron to act against the Spanish dominions in the West Indies. He sailed from Jamaica with six ships, attacked Porto Bello (Nov. 21), and captured it. He blew up the castle and fortifications ther
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sullivan, James 1744-1808 (search)
Sullivan, James 1744-1808 Lawyer; born in Berwick, Me., April 22, 1744; began practice in Biddeford in 1770; member of the Massachusetts constitutional convention in 1779-80; attorney-general of Massachusetts in 1790-1807; elected governor in 1807 and 1808. His publications include Observations on the government of the United States; History of the District of Maine; History of land-titles in Massachusetts; Dissertation on the constitutional liberty of the press; Correspondence with Colonel Pickering; History of the Penobscot Indians, in the Massachusetts Historical collections, etc. He died in Boston, Mass., Dec. 10, 1808.
1 2 3 4