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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 39 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 4 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 4 4 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 4 4 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 3 3 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1744 AD or search for 1744 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 35 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alamo, Fort, (search)
Alamo, Fort, A structure in San Antonio, Tex.; erected for a mission building in 1744; used for religious purposes till 1793, when, on account of the great strength of its walls, it was converted into a fort. In the struggle by Texas for independence, the most sanguinary and heroic conflict of the border warfare, which merged into the Mexican War, occurred there — a conflict which for years was familiar to Americans as the Thermopylae of Texas. The fort was about an acre in extent, oblong, and surrounded by a wall 8 or 10 feet in height by 3 feet in thickness. A body of Texans, under the command of Col. William Barrett Davis, retired into the fort early in 1836, upon the dismantling of San Antonio by Sam Houston, and then Santa Ana, with a large force, invested the fort Feb. 23. The Texans numbered only 140 men, while the Mexican army was 4,000 strong. The enemy took possession of the town, then erected batteries on both sides of the river, and for twenty-four hours bombarded
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bache, Sarah, 1744- (search)
Bache, Sarah, 1744- Philanthropist; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 11, 1744; daughter of Benjamin Franklin and wife of Richard Bache; was distinguished throughout the Revolutionary War for her efforts to relieve the condition of the American troops, collecting money, prchasing medicines and other supplies, and directing nearly 3,000 women in the work of making clothing and other necessities for the army. She also performed valuable service in the hospitals as a nurse. She died Oct. 5, 1808.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, Edward, 1744-1820 (search)
Bancroft, Edward, 1744-1820 Naturalist; born in Westfield, Mass., Jan. 9, 1744; was a pupil of Silas Deane (q. v.) when the latter was a school-master. His early education was not extensive. Apprenticed to a mechanic, he ran away, in debt to his master, and went to sea; but returning with means, he compensated his employer. Again he went to sea; settled in Guiana, South America, as a physician, in 1763, and afterwards made his residence in London, where, in 1769, he published a Natural history of Guiana. He became a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, and Fellow of the Royal Society. While Franklin was in England on a diplomatic mission, Dr. Bancroft became intimate with him; and through the influence of the philosopher became a contributor to the philosopher became a contributor to the Monthly review. He was suspected by the British government of participation in the attempt to burn the Portsmouth dock-yards, and he fled to Passy, France. Soon afterwards he met Sila
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- (search)
Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- Clergyman; born in Boston, June 4, 1744; was graduated at Harvard College in 1762; studied theology; taught school four years; was pastor of a church in Dover. N. H., from 1767 to 1786, and of the Federal Street Church, in Boston, from April 4, 1787, until his death. June 20, 1798. He founded the Massachusetts Historical Society; was an overseer of Harvard College; was a patriot during the war for independence, an opponent of African slavery, and a promoter of literature and science. He published a History of New Hampshire, 3 volumes (1784-92); a collection of Psalms and hymns (1795); The Foresters, a work of wit and humor (1792); American biography, 2 volumes (1794-98), besides sermons and other religious-writings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blount, William, 1744-1800 (search)
Blount, William, 1744-1800 Statesman; born in North Carolina, in 1744; was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1782-83, 1786, and 1787; and was a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution. In 1790 he was appointed governor of the territory south of the Ohio. (See Northwestern Territory.) He was president of the convention that formed the State of Tennessee in 1796, and was chosen the first United States Senator from the new State. Blount was impeached in 1797 b1744; was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1782-83, 1786, and 1787; and was a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution. In 1790 he was appointed governor of the territory south of the Ohio. (See Northwestern Territory.) He was president of the convention that formed the State of Tennessee in 1796, and was chosen the first United States Senator from the new State. Blount was impeached in 1797 by the House of Representatives, charged with having intrigued, while territorial governor, to transfer New Orleans and neighboring districts (then belonging to Spain) to Great Britain by means of a joint expedition of Englishmen and Creek and Cherokee Indians. He was expelled from the Senate, and the process was discontinued in the House. His popularity in Tennessee was increased by these proceedings, and he became, by the voice of the people, a State Senator and president of that body. He di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boscawen, Edward, 1711- (search)
Boscawen, Edward, 1711- Naval officer; born in Cornwall, England, Aug. 19, 1711; son of Viscount Falmouth; was made a captain in the royal navy in March, 1737. Distinguished at Porto Bello and Carthagena, he was promoted to the command of a 60-gun ship in 1744, in which he took the Media. He signalized himself under Anson in the battle off Cape Finisterre in 1747, and against the French in the East Indies as rear-admiral the next year. He made himself master of Madras, and returned to England in 1751. Admiral of the Blue, he commanded an expedition against Louisburg, Cape Breton, in 1758, with General Amherst. In 1759 he defeated the French fleet in the Mediterranean, capturing 2,000 prisoners. For these services he was made general of the marines and member of the privy council. Parliament also granted him a pension of $15,000 a year. He died Jan. 10, 1761.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, John, 1744- (search)
Brown, John, 1744- patriot; born in Sandisfield, Mass., Oct. 19, 1744; was graduated at Yale College in 1761; became a lawyer and active patriot; entered Canada in disguise (1774-75) to obtain information and secure the co-operation of the Canadians with the other colonists, and aided Ethan Allen in the capture of Ticonderoga. He was active with Montgomery in the siege of Quebec. In August, 1776, he was made lieutenant-colonel, and, on the morning of Sept. 18, 1776, he surprised the outposts of Ticonderoga, set free 100 American prisoners, captured four companies of British regulars, a quantity of stores and cannon, and destroyed a number of boats and an armed sloop. He left the service because of his detestation of Benedict Arnold, but continued to act with the militia. He was killed by Indians in the Mohawk Valley, Oct. 19, 1780. abolitionist; born in Torrington, Conn., May 9, 1800; hanged in Charlestown, Va., Dec. 2, 1859; was a descendant of Peter Brown of the May
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cushing, Thomas 1725- (search)
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, Benjamin 1706-1790 (search)
founder of the Philadelphia Library in 1731. He became clerk of the Provincial Assembly in 1736, and postmaster of Philadelphia the next year. He was the founder of the University of Pennsylvania and the Philosophical Society of Philadelphia in 1744, and was elected a member of the Provincial Assembly in 1750. In 1753 he was appointed deputy postmaster for the English-American colonies; and in 1754 he was a delegate to the Colonial Congress of Albany, in which he prepared a plan of union forary labors of usefulness for his fellow-men. In addition to scientific and literary institutions, he was the founder of the first fire-company in Philadelphia in 1738; organized a volunteer military association for the defence of the province in 1744; and was colonel of a regiment, and built forts for the defence of the frontiers in 1755. He was the inventor of the Franklin stove (q. v.), which in modified forms is still in use. He was also the inventor of the lightning-rod. Franklin left tw
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, William 1729-1813 (search)
Franklin, William 1729-1813 Royal governor; born in Philadelphia in 1729, only son of Benjamin Franklin. It is not known who his mother was. About a year after his birth Franklin was married, took his child into his own house, and brought him up as his son. He held a captain's commission in the French War (1744-48). From 1754 to 1756 he was comptroller of the colonial post-office, and clerk to the Provincial Assembly. He went to London with his father in 1757, and was admitted to the bar in 1758. In 1762 he was appointed governor of the province of New Jersey, remaining loyal to the crown when the Revolution broke out, and in January, 1776, a guard was put over him at his residence at Perth Amboy. He gave his parole that he would not leave the province. In June (1776) he called a meeting of the legislature of New Jersey, for which offence, defiance of public opinion, he was arrested and sent to Connecticut, where for more than two years he was strictly guarded, when, in Novem
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